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Plates

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NEWS
September 8, 1992 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
Volunteers loaded nearly a thousand paper plates with donated food yesterday at the first picnic for the homeless sponsored by the Philadelphia Rescue Mission-Family Rescue Service. Ronald Leiter, mission director, said, "We were trying to do something to bring attention to the plight of the homeless in Philadelphia. " Said one woman at the event: "This was a good idea. "
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
I have a complete collection (five) of a limited edition of Worcester pewter plates, still in their original boxes and in mint condition. They were issued in connection with the U.S. Bicentennial and with these issue dates and titles: 1972 Boston Tea Party, 1973 Ride of Paul Revere, 1974 Incident at Concord Bridge, 1975 Signing of the Declaration of Independence, 1976 Washington Crossing the Delaware. Can you tell me what they might be worth and where I might sell them? Based on recent transactions on the trading floor of the Bradford Exchange, Box 45204, Chicago, Ill. 60648, the largest trader in limited-edition plates, it appears some of your Bicentennial plates were good investments and others were not. For instance, the 1972 Boston Tea Party, which cost $45 when issued, traded last month at $125.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Porcelain is a common element in still-life painting, but German artist Suscha Korte's paintings of porcelain plates are a different animal. They aren't still lifes; they're treated more like mandalas whose symbolic significance is mysterious and alluring. At Temple Gallery, Korte is showing six large oil paintings from a series she calls "Danced Shoes. " Each canvas consists of three plates, seen full-face, in a horizontal row across the canvas. Each is decorated distinctively; some are floral, others are banded.
NEWS
March 19, 2011 | Associated Press
ALMATY, Kazakhstan - Traffic police in a southern Kazakhstan city have complained of a rising tide of motorists replacing their license plates with signs reading "I Love Sex. " Online news channel Mir reported yesterday that one of them, a 19-year old motorist in Kyzyl-Orda, was fined $1,000 for pinning the provocative plate to his SUV. The station also showed police footage of another car bearing a more chaste plate honoring a woman: "I Love...
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting with a sale this afternoon featuring Perillo plates and another tomorrow featuring monkey plates, the next four days will offer five sales to the west, to the south and to the north. The 50 signed Perillo plates, all from a single consigner, will be offered by Annette and Harold M. Smith Jr. at a sale of antiques and collectibles at 4 p.m. today at the Downingtown Marketplace on Business Route 30 next to the Tabas Hotel. Perillo plates are contemporary limited-edition plates done by a New York artist who specializes in Native American scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
I have six attractive, shiny plates - three depicting a colonial man in wig and breeches who has been thrown from a white horse, three with a colonial man seated at a table, arms outstretched, with another man standing and facing him and leaning on a cane. All six plates have on the back, "Made at Ye Buffalo Pottery 1908, Deldare Ware underglaze, 1908. " Your rare and desirable Buffalo Pottery Deldare plates are worth $125 each, according to Seymour Altman. Altman and his wife, Violet, wrote the definitive book on the subject, Buffalo Pottery, published by Crown in 1969 and now out of print (the Altmans have a few books left, which they sell for $50)
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Robert de Saint Phalle, 13, is hoping that visitors to Marshallton on Saturday make a stop at the Goddard Early Learning Center on Sugars Bridge Road. There, the young artist will have his handmade Christmas cards and china plates, embossed with his original designs, in a craft sale as part of Saturday's festivities in the village. He has been designing Christmas cards for his friends since the fifth grade, but his drawing days go back to when he has 3 and growing up in Marshallton with his parents, Jean and Fal. "He started by drawing trucks - and they were very detailed for a child his age," said Jean, an artist who graduated from the Philadelphia College of Art. "He once drew a rabbit on the back of a matches cover," added his father.
NEWS
November 3, 2001 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
As comestibles go, oysters are among the more varied. They range in shape from the flat belons of France to the rock-like bluepoints of Long Island. Their flavors are equally diverse. For the last few years at their home in Moorestown, Jeanne and David Beck have hosted a holiday party for their colleagues at the Coriell Institute and others at which they set out oysters from beds in at least three different regions and challenge their guests to identify the subtle distinctions in flavor of each.
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Casey administration, which is considering ending the state's ubiquitous "You've Got a Friend in Pennsylvania" slogan, announced yesterday that the phrase would no longer be printed on car license plates. Instead, the state will return to plates containing only the words Pennsylvania and Keystone State, as well as the numbers and letters comprising the vehicle registration. Except for the position of the two words and the color combination (from blue lettering on a gold background to gold on blue)
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When eccentric Chicago billionaire John D. MacArthur died in 1978, his son, Roderick, came up with a bright idea for giving away his money. The son created the "genius grants" - large cash awards for people who make extraordinary contributions to society - which are unique and famous in the philanthropic world. But J. Roderick MacArthur had another bright idea that is described in considerably less favorable terms in a class-action lawsuit in Chicago Circuit Court. The lawsuit says the Bradford Exchange Ltd., created by Roderick MacArthur in 1973 to sell decorative "collector plates" to the masses, has been making inflated claims for years about the investment value of its plates.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Artist, author, and retired detective Joe Getsinger says Sally Snickers' pigtails point the way to "the bigger story of the King of Cartoons. " While doing research for a soon-to-be-published book, Getsinger found an early iteration of the distinctive Sally character in a 1930s comic strip by Jack Kirby, later the creator of Captain America, the Fantastic Four, and many more. "Sally helped me connect the dots" between Kirby's formative years and his fame, says Getsinger, who discovered the revelatory images within his collection of about 8,000 printing plates.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
NEW DIET guidelines: a death knell for meat eating? Headlines for February's long-awaited Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee recommendations practically shouted as much. And the meat industry seemed to agree: Barry Carpenter, president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute, quickly slammed the committee for a "flawed" report "generalizing about an entire category of foods," although that's exactly what the guidelines have done since back in the "Four Food Groups" days. At issue is a shift in the overall favorability of flesh-based foods in the diet: When the guidelines were last revised, in 2010, they said that healthy eating "emphasizes . . . lean meats and poultry," while the new recommendations say a healthy diet is "lower in red and processed meat.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Monday marks the official opening of Bing Bing Dim Sum, serving up panfried pastrami bao, barbecue-mushroom congee, and the biggest soup dumplings this city has ever seen. The buzz is considerable for its debut on East Passyunk Avenue, the hottest restaurant strip in the city. And for 31-year-old co-owners Ben Puchowitz and Shawn Darragh, who opened their first restaurant, the 30-seat Cheu Noodle Bar, less than two years ago, it's an ambitious step. But, once they've been open for three months and gotten Bing Bing's staff up to speed, who knows what's next?
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
YOU WON'T find Shane White, 18, a freshman at Holy Family University in Northeast Philadelphia, giving $5 haircuts, manicures or facials today at Bucks County Technical High School to raise money for City of Hope cancer research. But you will find him working the HopeCuts fundraiser at his Feasterville alma mater, supporting the 50 student barbers and cosmetologists trying to raise more than $10,000 for City of Hope like they did in a snowstorm last year. White's expertise is technology, not cosmetology, so he's been networking for months to spread the word about today's $5 HopeCuts, hoping a good crowd shows up from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. All the money goes to support the famous cancer-research hospital in Los Angeles that has clinical-trial research partnerships with Thomas Jefferson University and other Philadelphia hospitals.
FOOD
January 16, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Cocktails in hand, donor guests at the opening of "Body Worlds: Animals Inside Out" at the Franklin Institute hovered around a carving station. Instead of roast beef or turkey, however, the Frog Commissary Catering server sliced away at whole roast cauliflower, plating the "filets" with a dab of smoked tomato coulis and a scoop of kabocha squash, kale, and wheatberry pilaf. It was a convincingly hearty, savory dish for a cold evening, particularly given that the entire event was vegetarian.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Candles burned on every windowsill. Lights on the large, elegant holiday tree were on a dimmer that was adjusted to suit the manner of the music. So at the Crossing@Christmas concert Friday at Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill, there was a glow of the familiar in a program that was anything but. Holiday concerts are not occasions for surprise. Yet middling ones arrived via the side door both here and in two versions of Handel's Messiah that showed what different experiences that overfamiliar masterwork can be. The Brandywine Singers and Tempesta di Mare chose the infrequently heard Dublin version Saturday with no conductor at all, while the Philadelphia Orchestra's Sunday Messiah had guest conductor Matthew Halls from the front lines of England's ever-evolving early-music scene.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers are returning to the Statehouse from summer break facing a withering indictment of the state's finances: two credit downgrades from Wall Street ratings agencies criticizing poor long-term fiscal planning. The immediate effect, an increase in the cost of borrowing, may not be too burdensome given the current low interest rates. But the downgrades by Standard & Poor's and Fitch Ratings, the seventh and eighth on Gov. Christie's watch, magnify the state's systemic fiscal problems.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCIL members reconvene tomorrow morning after a sweltering summer hiatus, and they've got lots to do, right out of the gate. Public-school funding and the sale of Philadelphia Gas Works top the agenda. The asset-purchase agreement of PGW and its proposed $1.86 billion sale to UIL Holdings Corp. is being pushed by Mayor Nutter as one of his administration's final initiatives to help fill a $5 billion gap in unfunded pension liabilities. Council members have danced around an answer on whether the sale should go through, saying they await results of an analytical report from Concentric Energy Advisors on the viability of the sale.
SPORTS
August 7, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josh Huff was drafted just one round after Jordan Matthews, and yet he has been lost in his fellow rookie wide receiver's shadow at this Eagles training camp. While the coaches have earmarked Matthews for a starting spot in the slot, and narrowed his playbook load, Huff has been asked to learn every receiver role. "I can't get caught up in all that," Huff said Tuesday. "That's where the coaches want him at and he's doing very well there. . . . On my end, what I can do is learn from his mistakes on the inside while managing my mistakes on the outside.
SPORTS
July 17, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
MINNEAPOLIS - For three minutes, Joe Torre tried to explain the bewilderment behind Rule 7.13 - an "experimental" provision to prevent home-plate collisions - and concluded with an indictment of the rule that has frustrated both managers and players. "It's not as confusing as I'm making it sound," Torre said Tuesday. Managers and players may disagree. Torre, Major League Baseball's executive vice president of baseball operations, said the rule will not be eliminated after its one-year trial.
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