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Plates

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NEWS
September 8, 1992 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
Volunteers loaded nearly a thousand paper plates with donated food yesterday at the first picnic for the homeless sponsored by the Philadelphia Rescue Mission-Family Rescue Service. Ronald Leiter, mission director, said, "We were trying to do something to bring attention to the plight of the homeless in Philadelphia. " Said one woman at the event: "This was a good idea. "
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
I have a complete collection (five) of a limited edition of Worcester pewter plates, still in their original boxes and in mint condition. They were issued in connection with the U.S. Bicentennial and with these issue dates and titles: 1972 Boston Tea Party, 1973 Ride of Paul Revere, 1974 Incident at Concord Bridge, 1975 Signing of the Declaration of Independence, 1976 Washington Crossing the Delaware. Can you tell me what they might be worth and where I might sell them? Based on recent transactions on the trading floor of the Bradford Exchange, Box 45204, Chicago, Ill. 60648, the largest trader in limited-edition plates, it appears some of your Bicentennial plates were good investments and others were not. For instance, the 1972 Boston Tea Party, which cost $45 when issued, traded last month at $125.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Porcelain is a common element in still-life painting, but German artist Suscha Korte's paintings of porcelain plates are a different animal. They aren't still lifes; they're treated more like mandalas whose symbolic significance is mysterious and alluring. At Temple Gallery, Korte is showing six large oil paintings from a series she calls "Danced Shoes. " Each canvas consists of three plates, seen full-face, in a horizontal row across the canvas. Each is decorated distinctively; some are floral, others are banded.
NEWS
March 19, 2011 | Associated Press
ALMATY, Kazakhstan - Traffic police in a southern Kazakhstan city have complained of a rising tide of motorists replacing their license plates with signs reading "I Love Sex. " Online news channel Mir reported yesterday that one of them, a 19-year old motorist in Kyzyl-Orda, was fined $1,000 for pinning the provocative plate to his SUV. The station also showed police footage of another car bearing a more chaste plate honoring a woman: "I Love...
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting with a sale this afternoon featuring Perillo plates and another tomorrow featuring monkey plates, the next four days will offer five sales to the west, to the south and to the north. The 50 signed Perillo plates, all from a single consigner, will be offered by Annette and Harold M. Smith Jr. at a sale of antiques and collectibles at 4 p.m. today at the Downingtown Marketplace on Business Route 30 next to the Tabas Hotel. Perillo plates are contemporary limited-edition plates done by a New York artist who specializes in Native American scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
I have six attractive, shiny plates - three depicting a colonial man in wig and breeches who has been thrown from a white horse, three with a colonial man seated at a table, arms outstretched, with another man standing and facing him and leaning on a cane. All six plates have on the back, "Made at Ye Buffalo Pottery 1908, Deldare Ware underglaze, 1908. " Your rare and desirable Buffalo Pottery Deldare plates are worth $125 each, according to Seymour Altman. Altman and his wife, Violet, wrote the definitive book on the subject, Buffalo Pottery, published by Crown in 1969 and now out of print (the Altmans have a few books left, which they sell for $50)
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Robert de Saint Phalle, 13, is hoping that visitors to Marshallton on Saturday make a stop at the Goddard Early Learning Center on Sugars Bridge Road. There, the young artist will have his handmade Christmas cards and china plates, embossed with his original designs, in a craft sale as part of Saturday's festivities in the village. He has been designing Christmas cards for his friends since the fifth grade, but his drawing days go back to when he has 3 and growing up in Marshallton with his parents, Jean and Fal. "He started by drawing trucks - and they were very detailed for a child his age," said Jean, an artist who graduated from the Philadelphia College of Art. "He once drew a rabbit on the back of a matches cover," added his father.
NEWS
November 3, 2001 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
As comestibles go, oysters are among the more varied. They range in shape from the flat belons of France to the rock-like bluepoints of Long Island. Their flavors are equally diverse. For the last few years at their home in Moorestown, Jeanne and David Beck have hosted a holiday party for their colleagues at the Coriell Institute and others at which they set out oysters from beds in at least three different regions and challenge their guests to identify the subtle distinctions in flavor of each.
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Casey administration, which is considering ending the state's ubiquitous "You've Got a Friend in Pennsylvania" slogan, announced yesterday that the phrase would no longer be printed on car license plates. Instead, the state will return to plates containing only the words Pennsylvania and Keystone State, as well as the numbers and letters comprising the vehicle registration. Except for the position of the two words and the color combination (from blue lettering on a gold background to gold on blue)
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When eccentric Chicago billionaire John D. MacArthur died in 1978, his son, Roderick, came up with a bright idea for giving away his money. The son created the "genius grants" - large cash awards for people who make extraordinary contributions to society - which are unique and famous in the philanthropic world. But J. Roderick MacArthur had another bright idea that is described in considerably less favorable terms in a class-action lawsuit in Chicago Circuit Court. The lawsuit says the Bradford Exchange Ltd., created by Roderick MacArthur in 1973 to sell decorative "collector plates" to the masses, has been making inflated claims for years about the investment value of its plates.
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SPORTS
August 7, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josh Huff was drafted just one round after Jordan Matthews, and yet he has been lost in his fellow rookie wide receiver's shadow at this Eagles training camp. While the coaches have earmarked Matthews for a starting spot in the slot, and narrowed his playbook load, Huff has been asked to learn every receiver role. "I can't get caught up in all that," Huff said Tuesday. "That's where the coaches want him at and he's doing very well there. . . . On my end, what I can do is learn from his mistakes on the inside while managing my mistakes on the outside.
SPORTS
July 17, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
MINNEAPOLIS - For three minutes, Joe Torre tried to explain the bewilderment behind Rule 7.13 - an "experimental" provision to prevent home-plate collisions - and concluded with an indictment of the rule that has frustrated both managers and players. "It's not as confusing as I'm making it sound," Torre said Tuesday. Managers and players may disagree. Torre, Major League Baseball's executive vice president of baseball operations, said the rule will not be eliminated after its one-year trial.
SPORTS
June 23, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
ST. LOUIS - Cole Hamels appeared irked on the mound, and since the Phillies' lefthander declined to speak with reporters after Saturday's 4-1 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals, catcher Carlos Ruiz provided some insight. "He felt the umpire [Larry Vanover] was a little inconsistent," Ruiz said, "but he was still throwing good pitches and getting people out. " Hamels struck out eight but walked five. He threw 120 pitches, 75 for strikes. The five walks tied a season high and matched the total he had in his previous three starts.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
The breakfast menu at the Oregon Diner on Friday was hard feelings, over easy as the vanquished Democratic candidates for governor met with winner Tom Wolf and party leaders in a unity ritual. U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz, state Treasurer Rob McCord, and Katie McGinty, the former state environmental secretary, and Wolf talked and noshed along with former Gov. Ed Rendell, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, and U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, chairman of the city party. No grand communiques emerged, just a reaffirmation that everybody wants to beat Republican Gov. Corbett this fall.
SPORTS
April 28, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIX - Freddy Galvis started the season 1 for 25 but appeared in the Phillies lineup Saturday because Ryne Sandberg wants one of his key bench pieces to find his swing. Galvis is not alone in his struggles; the Phillies bench has lacked production over the first month of games. "I think up until now it's been adequate," Sandberg said. The manager used his lone lefthanded reserve bat - Tony Gwynn Jr. - in the seventh inning of Friday's 5-4 loss to Arizona. Gwynn hit a possible double-play ball that was booted by Diamondbacks shortstop Cliff Pennington and let in two runs.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
IF YOU WANT a different way to appreciate the power with which Josh Ockimey mashes baseballs, keep your eyes closed the next time you watch Ss. Neumann-Goretti High, because when the ball leaves his bat - the sound is unmistakable. Yesterday beneath a beautiful blue sky at 26th and Moore, baseball's springtime city sound track was in full effect. Birds chirped as cars whizzed past while hey-batter-batter banter flew from both dugouts. And when he stepped to the plate, Ockimey would read a simple message on his bat, clear his mind and pierce through all the noise with a simple swing of the bat. And that was with a tweaked lower back, which forced him into designated-hitter duty.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
IT IS PROBABLY overstating things to say Ben Revere was playing for his job yesterday afternoon. He went through something like this last year and eventually cemented himself as the Phillies' everyday centerfielder. Still, you don't want to give the guy behind you too many chances, and, over the previous week, Tony Gwynn Jr. had not just been getting those chances, but making the most of them, as well. And so here was Revere, who had entered the day riding an 0-for-12 skid, stepping to the plate with two outs in the eighth inning, the go-ahead run on second base.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
IT TOOK only 54 seconds for umpires to confirm what they ruled they had seen in the fourth inning. It is going to take a lot longer for the Phillies to understand. "I think nobody really knows what the rule is, honestly," Tony Gwynn Jr. said. The situation: sixth inning, tie game, Gwynn on first base. Chase Utley lines a double to leftfield, where Marlins rookie Christian Yelich juggles the ball as he fields it off the ground. Phillies third-base coach Pete Mackanin waves Gwynn around third.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
THE PHILLIES and their equipment - balls, bats, helmets, etc. - arrived in Chicago in the early hours of Thursday morning, still more than 24 hours before they would play their first game at Wrigley Field. But as Chase Utley patrolled the front of the cramped visiting clubhouse in the 100-year-old ballpark on Friday, with a ski cap keeping his head warm in the early-morning cold, he couldn't find an important piece of equipment. He poked into one bag. And then another. "I can't find my bat," he said of his game bat. Utley eventually found it. Although the bat broke at one point over the weekend, Utley and his swing stayed in tune for the final half of a road trip that saw a couple of the team's key cogs in sync at the plate.
FOOD
March 14, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years before winning over diners with dishes like chowder-poached oysters and gnocchi with snails, Fitler Dining Room chef Robert Marzinsky had a different artistic vision: He and a group of fellow art-school graduates made site-specific installations using ceramics and other materials. Since the works were temporary, he said, "We recognized that, to some extent, the real work was when you documented it. You'd come back with 500 slides, and spend $300 to process the film. " Today, in his kitchen at 22d and Spruce, Marzinsky is still making things that are ephemeral and beautiful - and he still acknowledges the impulse to document those creations.
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