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NEWS
May 24, 2006
RE BARBARO: You have to be kidding. The big news is a horse breaking his leg, and getting an emergency operation, while under the guise of "supporting our troops," hundreds of injured GIs can't find sufficient health care? No wonder there isn't any morality left when animals are more important than humans. Ralph Goldsborough, Yeadon Duke double standard Columnist Jenice M. Armstrong wrote on May 17: "The Duke University lacrosse players will never be considered innocent even if exonerated of rape because they engaged in an activity that demeaned and exploited women.
NEWS
September 5, 1986
In reply to the Aug. 24 Letter to the Editor by A. M. Ladduwahetty, I must protest the attempt to taint the opinions of the readers. Since we are not totally aware of all the facts dealing with the 155 Tamil refugees in Canada, it is both unfair and unwise of us to draw conclusions at this time. What we do know is the reason that the Tamils are forced to flee their homeland. Our plight is one much like that of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union. In both cases, a large, influential minority is subjugated by the government, having both political and basic human rights stripped from them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Describing The Afghan Women as a play that mixes the style and conventions of Greek drama with preachy speeches about the plight and future of current-day Afghanistan makes it sound like something you might not want to sit through. I'll admit that in the early going, I more or less resigned myself to a long evening of imitative, although very exciting, didactic theater. But I'm pleased to report that, ultimately, my experience of the play by William Mastrosimone - receiving its first professional presentation in an excellent production from the Passage Theatre Company - was quite the opposite.
LIVING
August 9, 1987 | Inquirer staff and wire service reviews, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two Australian imports top the list this week: last year's staggeringly popular down-under comedy and a less well-known drama. "CROCODILE" DUNDEE (1986) (Paramount) $29.95. 102 minutes. Paul Hogan, the most popular entertainer in Australia, was best-known in the United States for his tourism commercials. This riotously funny comedy changed that. He stars as a crocodile hunter from the outback who winds up in the jungle of Manhattan. It's the oft-tested device of having an innocent outsider show up the supposed sophisticates, but Hogan gives it a hilarious variation.
NEWS
May 3, 2007
I'D LIKE ANY of the mayoral candidates to address the needs of the "not-so-poor" people of Philadelphia. Recent news reports say that there is no more middle class - and I agree. Because I earn about 50k a year, I don't qualify as low-income, but am far from wealthy. I'd like to purchase one of the many new homes being built in this city, but they start at 200k, and that is out of my budget. The homes being built by Philadelphia Housing Authority are nice, too, but I can't buy one of those because I only have two people in my household (myself and one child)
SPORTS
December 15, 1994 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
New York Giants coach Dan Reeves knows what Eagles coach Rich Kotite is going through. He coached under the same ominous cloud and twisted in the same harsh wind two years ago in Denver. "It's by far the most difficult situation I ever went through," Reeves said, referring to his final season as head coach in Denver, when it was widely (and accurately) reported that owner Pat Bowlen had decided to dump him after the last game. "It's the uncertainty of it. People are human.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD JR., Daily News Staff Writer
This year's Academy Award-winning documentary, "Broken Rainbow" - the story of the forced relocation of more than 400 Navajo families - will be screened tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. at the Friends Center, 1501 Cherry St. The relocation, the result of a 1974 law whose deadline in July 7, is "the largest (such) project since Japanese-Americans were interned at camps in World War II," according to Navajo spokesman Larry Anderson. The screening is a benefit presented by the Big Mountain Support Group of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
YOUR EDITORIAL cartoon regarding Erica Pratt was really uncalled for and could be very damaging to her mental state (July 25). Just being kidnapped and left in a basement for 23 hours is a scare that she may never be able to let go of. Someone should reprimand the artist. Keith J. Richards Philadelphia How dare Signe Wilkinson put such a tasteless cartoon like this one about Erica's returning to her neighborhood that is drug-infested. Your cartoon is NOT WANTED in the paper.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
ON A RECENT Sunday, I was walking my dog in Northeast Philadelphia. A rottweiler was off his leash and out of the yard, running loose. He spotted me and my dog, and charged. He attacked and bit me on my back, and scratched my stomach, arms and face. Neighbors responded to my cries and managed to chase the dog away. The police were called, but it took more than an hour for them to arrive. The dog's owner wasn't home. Who leaves a dog unattended outdoors and unleashed? The police officer who showed up wasn't concerned about the situation, just writing minimal information in a useless report.
NEWS
April 11, 2001
I invite City Solicitor Kenneth Trujillo to get out from behind his desk and come to North Philly and ride with us firefighters. Come into a burning dwelling with us, crawl around on hands and knees in the thick black smoke, only to discover you were just crawling around in hypodermic needles and human waste. Then tell us hepatitis C is not work-related. MICHAEL PATRICK BRESNAN Philadelphia I'm tired of the city's excuses for not honoring the arbitrator's contract award to the firefighters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beth Stroud, a Methodist pastor, said she knew what to expect when she told her Philadelphia congregation in 2003 that she was a lesbian. A church trial. A guilty verdict. And a vote to strip her minister credentials. All three happened. What shocked Stroud was the jury vote on her punishment: 7-6. One shy of being able to serve as an openly homosexual pastor in the United Methodist Church. A decade has passed since Stroud challenged the church, drawing intense national attention and supporters and protesters to her trial.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doubt too many people at your local supermarket have ever heard of Robert Hayden, Elizabeth Bishop, or Anne Bradstreet. But mention Sylvia Plath's name and you're likely to get a reaction. Plath, who committed suicide 50 years ago at the age of 30, is a rarity: a famous poet. She remains popular, and retains a certain sex appeal in an age when poetry, and poets, have become increasingly academic, insular, and marginalized. She has even been immortalized on celluloid by Gwyneth Paltrow in the 2003 biopic Sylvia . West Chester University's acclaimed poetry center will celebrate Plath's life and work with a program of poetry readings and discussions by seven women artists and writers Sunday, on what would have been Plath's 81st birthday.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Paul J. Griffiths
For Catholics around the world, there is no greater force for change than the views of a pope. Pope Francis gets an opportunity to shed light on what kind of papacy his will be this week when he takes his first trip abroad, to Brazil. This is a visit to watch, for it will not only reveal more about this new papacy, but it may also spark social and economic change in the region. As an Argentine and the cardinal archbishop of Buenos Aires from 2001 until his election, Francis knows well the plight of millions of poor people in the region.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield and Trisha Thomas, Associated Press
LAMPEDUSA, Sicily - Pope Francis on Monday denounced the "globalization of indifference" that greets migrants who risk their lives trying to reach Europe, as he traveled to the farthest reaches of Italy to draw attention to their plight and to mourn those who never made it. The tiny Sicilian island of Lampedusa, a treeless strip of rock four miles long, is closer to Africa than the Italian mainland and is the main port of entry into Europe for African...
NEWS
June 19, 2013
As last week's abortive meeting between the two Koreas illustrated, the region's foreign policy often seems to be at the mercy of Pyongyang's irrational whims. This week, North Korea was at it again, proposing high-level talks with Washington just a few months after it threatened to bomb Austin, Texas. While diplomats debate ad infinitum, many of North Korea's 25 million people live a nightmare. Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International estimate that up to 200,000 North Koreans, some of them children, are imprisoned in camps modeled after the Soviet gulags, where they are subjected to torture and forced labor.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four parents and school staff members began a fast Monday under a tent outside Gov. Corbett's Philadelphia office to advocate for safe schools. The fast, which started about 11 a.m., began in response to the layoffs of about 1,200 noontime aides. The four say they will sit under the tent outside 200 S. Broad St. during the day and forgo all food and drink, save water, until the city's schools are fully funded and the laid-off staffers are rehired. There is no set end date. "Without a safe environment, students can't learn," fast participant Earlene Bly said.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia family of five lived without a working toilet for a month after the landlord refused to fix it. When the family withheld the rent - which is legal - the landlord locked them out. Because they didn't have an attorney, the family was never able to get back into the apartment. That was one of dozens of stories conveyed at a Pennsylvania Senate Judiciary Committee public hearing at the Philadelphia Bar Association in Center City on Thursday on the importance of civil legal help for the poor.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Marcus Hook Borough Mayor James Schiliro deals with charges that he held an acquaintance hostage and fired a gun during a drunken episode at his home in February, residents Tuesday expressed mixed feelings about whether he should resign. Schiliro, 38, a Republican, has said he would not seek reelection but intends to serve the remaining nine months of his four-year term. Schiliro apologized at a Monday night council meeting for the negative publicity that "his arrest has cast on the borough," according to the Delaware County Times.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been 30 years since the last supermarket set up shop in Camden, at its far southern end - now the only such store in the city. Since then, most residents have turned to bodegas and other small groceries to purchase food. The Camden Children's Garden and its affiliated Camden City Garden Club have tried to fill the fresh-produce void. But that role may be in jeopardy as the garden faces eviction from its waterfront home. Each growing season, hundreds of seeds are planted in the Children's Garden grow labs and later transferred to community gardens throughout the city.
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