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NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Ralph Cipriano and Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writers
As protesters sang "If I had a Hammer," George Lakey, a peace activist, and Jim Gemmell, a carpenter, were pounding nails into a symbolic plywood house that they assembled in front of the William J. Green Federal Building yesterday at Sixth and Arch Streets. After the walls went up, Lakey, Gemmell and other volunteers hoisted a roof into place, as protesters began chanting. "What do we want?" yelled Leona Smith, a homeless activist. "Housing," was the reply from a hundred voices.
NEWS
March 31, 1999 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
It's spring cleaning time in the Ludlow area, where crews are emptying vacant lots and abandoned houses of years of accumulated trash and debris prior to sealing them up with plywood. L&I and PHA routinely clean and seal vacant properties, but "Operation Clean Sweep" is the first time the two departments and the Army National Guard have joined efforts to target a specific area - Ludlow. Philadelphia Housing Authority Executive Director Carl Greene said the Ludlow area in lower North Philadelphia makes sense because PHA owns about 500 scattered sites in the neighborhood.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | By Katherine Scobey, Special to The Inquirer
Charles S. Creigh, 82, of Rosemont, an executive in the plywood industry, died July 27 at the Waverly Heights life-care community in Gladwyne. Born in Roncevert, W. Va., Mr. Creigh graduated from high school and for a time played minor-league baseball in that state, his daughter, Ruth Currie, said. He was a shortstop. In 1932 he moved to Baltimore and entered the fledgling plywood industry as a salesman with United States Plywood Corp., for which he worked for 37 years. The company sent Mr. Creigh to this area in March 1937 to manage its Philadelphia division.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two shipping lines will begin monthly deliveries of plywood from Malaysia to the Beckett Street terminal in Camden, the South Jersey Port Corp. said yesterday. The Hoegh and East Indies shipping lines will be delivering about 4,000 tons of plywood a month, said Paul McGovern, a port spokesman. The first ship to call at the South Jersey port was the Hoegh Dene, which last week delivered 1,500 tons of plywood. McGovern said the shipment of plywood from Malaysia was a new line of business for the two shipping lines.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dockworker was killed at the Gloucester Marine Terminal yesterday by a bundle of lumber that came loose while being unloaded from a cargo ship and fell three stories to the pier. Edward Wheeler, 59, of Sicklerville, was declared dead at the scene. Wheeler was standing on the pier about 10:10 a.m. while a crane unloaded plywood from the Toki, a ship based in the Bahamas. One of two straps holding the bundle together slipped, causing the load to shift and tumble, authorities said.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 8-by-8-foot pink plywood valentine was delivered to the Camden police late yesterday afternoon. Actually, the heart-shaped valentine, which proclaims "Camden's police are in our hearts" in big black letters, wasn't so much delivered as installed - on a lightpost outside the Police Administration Building. "We wanted the police to know we appreciate the support they've shown community groups in our fight to clean up the city," said Barbara Harrison, a Camden resident who came up with the idea Saturday while shopping for valentines.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | For The Inquirer / LAURENCE KESTERSON
Sue Crowder's cows don't need to be milked or mucked out but she does put them out to pasture in her yard along Route 796 in New London, Pa. The Chester County woman makes the creatures out of plywood and sells them to admirers of the bovine silhouette.
NEWS
July 20, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two historic ships at the Independence Seaport Museum - the 1892 Cruiser Olympia and the World War II submarine Becuna - will close Aug. 15 for a restoration project and will reopen Oct. 1, officials at the Penn's Landing museum announced yesterday. The project will see the replacement of the Becuna's top deck, where partially rotted areas have been covered with plywood. All such nonhistorical plywood and rotted slats will be removed, officials said. Repairs and placements will be made to steel deck-support structures, and wood deck slats will be replaced with Angelique timber to closely match the appearance of the original.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
The Phantom Fountain at 21st and Pine Streets, a time capsule of a drugstore/soda fountain from 1953, has become a full-time soda fountain, open afternoons and evenings. The Fountain is the restored Norris Pharmacy, which operated from the 1920s until 1953, when Elva Norris shuttered it in plywood. The current owners, Bruce Menkowitz and architect Martin Rosenblum, have kept nearly everything as it was.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Kurt Pfitzer, Special to The Inquirer
A 34-year-old unemployed Wyncote man is one of two men charged with conspiring to smuggle 9,000 pounds of marijuana into the Port of Philadelphia. Authorities said the shipment was the largest seized at the port this year and had a street value of $3.6 million. U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and Customs Service officials in Philadelphia said the man, Allan C. Kane of the 1400 block of Mellon Road, and a companion tried to conceal the marijuana in a shipment of plywood from Ghana.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question : I live in a condo and recently had my carpet pulled up, plywood put down, and then tile on top in my master bath dressing room. After six months, the grout in the upper area began to crumble and came out. The tile man came back and re-grouted the area. He does not know why it is happening; there was no water leakage. Now it is happening again in the same area. The tile man has 25 years experience and came highly recommended. Can you offer some advice? Answer: I'd probably blame the plywood used as the underlayment.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a cluttered fifth-floor studio in North Philadelphia, two huge pieces of plywood hang from the ceiling, pulsing in time with the music from a pair of high-end stereo speakers. thoompa-thoomp-thoomp . . . But whoa - upon closer inspection, the big pieces of plywood actually are the speakers. They have wires attached to the back, and, somehow, they sound really good. Typical for Hive76. It is a hacker space, a kind of inventors' clubhouse where castoff 21st-century junk and random parts are fused together in a collaborative cauldron of ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
French philosopher Simone Weil observed that "the past, once destroyed, never returns. Its destruction is perhaps the greatest of all crimes. " That snippet of insight might apply to moving the Barnes Foundation, but fortunately not to Thomas Eakins' masterpiece, The Gross Clinic. Since it was exhibited in the Centennial exposition of 1876 (not in the art section but in a mock-up of an Army hospital), the painting has undergone five major conservation interventions. Given that several of these effaced history, one hesitates to describe them all as "restorations.
NEWS
May 4, 2010 | By BARBARA LAKER, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
THE HOLDOUTS live on a block of plywood and padlocks, so eerie it looks like a street ravaged by war. Twenty five years ago, it was. The aging neighbors of Osage Avenue have treated each other like family since May 13, 1985, when the city dropped a bomb on the house at 6221, home of the radical group MOVE, killing 11 people inside and igniting a fire that leveled their block. The city quickly rebuilt their homes, but botched the job, leaving residents with a litany of problems including massive water leaks, blocked drainage pipes, missing support beams and falling bricks.
NEWS
December 11, 2008 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cut costs. Raise revenues. That's the mantra in any monetary crisis. Last month, the Nutter administration proposed drastic cuts in city services to close the projected billion-dollar deficit in its five-year budgetary plan. Yesterday, City Controller Alan Butkovitz cast harsh light on the revenue side of the ledger, noting that $20 million to $30 million a year has gone uncollected by the Department of Licenses and Inspections since 2005 because of "inadequacies" in the program that manages the demolition of condemned buildings.
NEWS
September 7, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
Clean lines and sleek materials give a modern edge to the traditional look of basket weave. Store a bottle (or six) in the wooden Knot wine rack ($105). Order at Foster's Homeware, 399 Market St., or www.shopfosters.com . Strips of sustainable untreated plywood entwine to form a cocoon-like lamp (several styles offered, $500-$2,200). Order at Design Within Reach, 1710 Walnut St., or www.dwr.com . Belgian blue stone tops off the cross-cut sides of the Bobo side table ($998)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Considering the number of major works by Marcel Duchamp that have been on view in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Arensberg Collection since the early 1950s, it's not surprising that his influence is reflected in the work of many of this city's artists. Then again, Duchamp's shadow is sometimes shorter than it seems. Gerald Nichols, a regional artist who has an exhibition of paintings and recent constructions at Arcadia University Art Gallery, looks at first to have a kinship with Duchamp - he uses found objects and leaves them intact, among other things - but his sensibility is actually closer to that of the surrealist Joseph Cornell, who was a fan of Duchamp's art and was, at one time, his assistant (Duchamp likewise admired Cornell's boxes and collages)
NEWS
January 7, 2007 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
If you cook healthful food, it stands to reason that you would want a healthful kitchen. Which means avoiding plywood and particle board, which give off gaseous formaldehyde, and steering clear of PVC and vinyl, which leach lead, cadmium and phthalate plasticizers. When they burn, they give off dioxin. But let's skip the bad news. The good news is that healthful kitchens are easy to come by, as demonstrated by Jennifer Roberts in her excellent book Good Green Kitchens (Gibbs Smith, $29.95)
NEWS
July 20, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two historic ships at the Independence Seaport Museum - the 1892 Cruiser Olympia and the World War II submarine Becuna - will close Aug. 15 for a restoration project and will reopen Oct. 1, officials at the Penn's Landing museum announced yesterday. The project will see the replacement of the Becuna's top deck, where partially rotted areas have been covered with plywood. All such nonhistorical plywood and rotted slats will be removed, officials said. Repairs and placements will be made to steel deck-support structures, and wood deck slats will be replaced with Angelique timber to closely match the appearance of the original.
LIVING
October 15, 2004 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
If you want to startle the trick-or-treaters on Halloween and have a few hours to spare in the next week or so, you can turn a piece of 3/4-inch exterior plywood into a 16 3/4-by-20-inch black cat. Add a few more hours, and you can fashion an eerie-looking 28 3/4-by-44-inch tombstone out of the same material - if you plan well, even the same 4-by-8 sheet of plywood. I know what you're saying: You don't have an artistic bone in your body, let alone a workshop full of tools.
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