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Pocket Park

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NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Hall, the Art Museum, theAcademy of Music - everyone knows them as special places of Philadelphia. But a colorful block in crumbling North Philadelphia, a street of meticulously kept rock gardens in Mount Airy - only the residents there know how special those places are. Until now. Today, The Inquirer continues a series, with the last of five articles on precious parts of this city, where people have made their world better. The vest-pocket park she helped to create is the pride of her Frankford neighborhood.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NEARLY A YEAR ago, residents of Manton Street in the Pennsport section of South Philadelphia were angry because the small "pocket park" they had spent months cleaning was sold at a city auction. But after the Daily News reported about the sale, developer U.S. Construction agreed to return two of the four lots to the city to be kept as a park. "Your article got their attention," said Mark Berman, president of Friends of Manton Street Park. "They called me the day after the article appeared.
NEWS
September 8, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the moment, there are only some circular white markings on flat green grass. But the landscape lime put down by planners carries some significance for Moorestown residents. The markings represent the outline of a plan to turn a small tract used mostly by squirrels into a refuge for people. The objective for Remembrance Park, which, when completed, will be dedicated to passive recreation, was to create a "quiet place to sit and enjoy nature," said Lynn Ware, president of Community Link, a nonprofit group cosponsoring the project with the Perkins Center for the Arts.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For more than a year, the people who run the shops and restaurants in Ardmore's commercial hub have dreamed of new sidewalks, street lights and trees, all part of a far-reaching revitalization plan. Those dreams are about to become reality, as architects, organizers and township officials prepare for the first phase of construction. Officials say work should begin by early spring along a thin strip on the south side of Lancaster Avenue between Ardmore and Cricket Avenues. When the work is completed, shoppers will see a repaved sidewalk with concrete, granite curbing and a strip of decorative bricks.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Little Roxborough - 40,000 in population and 5.5 square miles in size - took a victory lap last month. The announcement July 7 that it was selected for one of four "flexible format" Target stores within the city limits blew up social media - 300 shares on Facebook and about 50,000 views of the online post, said James Calamia, executive director of the Roxborough Development Corp. (RDC). "It's incredible so many folks have moved into this area," he said. "They have their own set of needs and wants, and it's not exactly the right products and services to match those needs.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN EUNICE "Pastor Cookie" Sanchez walks out the door of Iglesia del Barrio on Cambria Street near Kip, she comes face-to-face with two active drug corners - and an abandoned rowhouse with garbage spilling out of broken basement windows and dozens of pigeons flying through shattered third-floor windows. Junkies prowl Cambria Street like feral cats. When they shoot up in front of her Kensington church, Sanchez tells them to leave and they cross Kip Street to the rat-infested alley next to the pigeon house.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about bowing to pressure. John Blake had fiddlers on either side of him when he started to play Saturday afternoon at Frank Palumbo Sr. Park, and when Blake asked if any more fiddlers wanted to jam, two more rose from the audience. Blake had taken his violin into the heart of South Philadelphia to pay tribute to a local son, the late, great fiddler Joe Venuti. Also included on the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival bill were fellow violinists Michal Urbaniak, the great Polish emigre, and Dianne Monroe, a local phenom.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It is not a rhetorical question, although there does not seem to be a definitive answer when it is asked: Just how long does it take a borough to build a town square? So far, it has taken nearly two years just to plan the pocket park off Old York Road, which would be built as part of the Montgomery County open-space program. And no start date for construction has been scheduled. The lag has local developers - who are working in conjunction with the borough - antsy and dozens of neighbors and merchants frustrated.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For months, officials in this small, maximally developed borough pondered the idea of buying an Italian restaurant, tearing it down, and planting some grass and a couple of trees to make a neighborhood pocket park. That would have added much-needed trees to a charming but green-starved community. Now, however, the proposal has been erased from a 29-page plan on how to spend a $675,000 open-space grant from Montgomery County. The problem? Giuliani's Cafe, the 62-year-old restaurant on Iona Avenue that was the focus of the plan, wasn't dilapidated enough to satisfy the specifications of the grant application.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Little Roxborough - 40,000 in population and 5.5 square miles in size - took a victory lap last month. The announcement July 7 that it was selected for one of four "flexible format" Target stores within the city limits blew up social media - 300 shares on Facebook and about 50,000 views of the online post, said James Calamia, executive director of the Roxborough Development Corp. (RDC). "It's incredible so many folks have moved into this area," he said. "They have their own set of needs and wants, and it's not exactly the right products and services to match those needs.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN EUNICE "Pastor Cookie" Sanchez walks out the door of Iglesia del Barrio on Cambria Street near Kip, she comes face-to-face with two active drug corners - and an abandoned rowhouse with garbage spilling out of broken basement windows and dozens of pigeons flying through shattered third-floor windows. Junkies prowl Cambria Street like feral cats. When they shoot up in front of her Kensington church, Sanchez tells them to leave and they cross Kip Street to the rat-infested alley next to the pigeon house.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
PHILADELPHIA HAS PLENTY of green success stories - like the large swath of land now known as Liberty Lands Park. Formerly the site of the Burk Brothers Tannery, the two-acre parcel in Northern Liberties was left to become a vacant weed-ridden eyesore in the mid-'90s after an effort to turn the property into loft apartments fell through. And now? "It's our Times Square," said Matt Reuben, president of the Northern Liberties Neighbors Association, noting the park, equipped with several gardens and a playground, has become the center for local events in the neighborhood and "was a major factor in helping to transform the neighborhood.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It remains unclear whether a bronze Percheron might someday gaze out on Moorestown's business district, but a park honoring the breed of gentle workhorse now seems nearly certain. The nonprofit group Friends of Percheron Park reported that it raised an estimated $50,000 at a fund-raising gala on Tuesday, and that landscaping for the little park could begin this fall. A life-size statue of a Percheron, if it comes, "won't be standing in mud," publicity chair Julie Maravich said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Try to forget for a moment what a stud Diligence was. Yes, the legendary stallion sired more than 400 foals, but his amorous prowess is just part of why a group of Moorestown residents hopes to install a bronze statue in his honor. Diligence's truer claim to fame is as the founding father of the Percheron horse in America: a breed so hardworking and gentle that it became the nation's most popular draft horse. And it was to Moorestown that Percherons, including Diligence, were first imported to this country in the early 19th century.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NEARLY A YEAR ago, residents of Manton Street in the Pennsport section of South Philadelphia were angry because the small "pocket park" they had spent months cleaning was sold at a city auction. But after the Daily News reported about the sale, developer U.S. Construction agreed to return two of the four lots to the city to be kept as a park. "Your article got their attention," said Mark Berman, president of Friends of Manton Street Park. "They called me the day after the article appeared.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
NEIGHBORS in South Philadelphia who worked all summer to restore the Manton Street Park can finally celebrate. The park's four lots had been purchased by a developer at a city auction of vacant and surplus property, but a deal has been reached to retain part of the land as a small "pocket park. " Hercules W. Grigos, the lawyer for the developer, US Construction, said his clients "had no idea this was a park. " "We had no idea of the neighbors' actions [fixing up the park]
NEWS
May 21, 2010
Being on the bay at day?s end definitely beats being on the ocean. On the bay you can watch the sun set gloriously over the water ? instead of behind your back. These are some of the shore?s best spots to bask in the pinky-orange wonder of it all. - Becky Batcha The park, at Long Beach Boulevard and West Salem Avenue, has a big wooden pirate ship for kids to climb. For grown-ups, the grounds are well situated for watching the sun set over Barnegat Bay, with the marshes of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge and the causeway bridge as backdrops.
NEWS
May 4, 2007 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The name John F. Collins may be unfamiliar, but if you've spent any time wearing down shoe leather in Center City, you've probably passed through his world. A landscape architect, Collins has made a specialty out of slipping pocket parks into the cracks in Philadelphia's street grid. Stumbling upon one of his secret gardens today is like finding a $10 bill on the sidewalk - better, in fact. It was Collins, 70, who provided city planner Edmund Bacon with the idea in 1965 for the pedestrian walk that now hopscotches among the townhouses and gardens of Society Hill.
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