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Poe

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Formed by young theater people, Crescendo Theatre Company aims to create work that will interest and attract what it describes as "a new generation of theatergoer. " To that end, it previously presented a hip-hop-driven version of the little-performed Woyzeck and has now come up with a rock-musical adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart. " Presented at the Willow Theatre, a long block down Seventh Street from the house Poe lived in when he wrote the story in 1843, A Tell-Tale Heart (as Crescendo titles it)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Remember "The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill"? Part of that miseducation must have involved taxes.   Hill has been charged with failing to file income-tax returns for several years with the IRS, the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Jersey announced Thursday. The former member of the Fugees earned more than $1.6 million during 2005, 2006 and 2007, the three years that she failed to file returns, federal prosecutors said. If this had happened a decade earlier, she would owe a lot more.
NEWS
January 17, 2009
Unfair to Holder I was disappointed with Sen. Arlen Specter's personal attack on attorney general nominee Eric Holder ("Holder: Will be 'people's lawyer,' " yesterday). A lifelong Republican, I have supported the senator for most of his years in the Congress. But at a time when we are looking for nonpartisan approaches to solving the many problems we are experiencing, Specter chose to question Holder's "fitness" for the nomination, motivated - in my opinion - by nothing more than partisan politics and playing to the camera.
NEWS
February 17, 2009 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In the sallow afterglow of E. A. Poe's Jan. 19 bicentennial birthday, in the dim reaches of the centuries-old Library Company - where readers still nod over brittle pages as Poe once did - lie tales of murder and blood and horrors, stories crafted here, in the Quaker City, the city of gentility, peace, and ghastly death. Here, in exhibition cases still as open tombs, the shroud has been slipped from a dark Philadelphia. "Philadelphia Gothic: Murders, Mysteries, Monsters, & Mayhem," an exhibition on view at the Library Company, 1314 Locust St., from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. weekdays through April 14, is a reminder that shadows veil the face of the City of Brotherly Love, like tangles of poisonous weeds.
NEWS
October 31, 1998 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their arms full, the ninth graders in this University City High School class streamed into the library yesterday morning and began decorating the cloth-covered tables. For Langston Hughes, lover of board games and jazz, they laid down a Ouija table and a boom box. For Edgar Allan Poe, a man who liked his drink, they offered a bottle of tequila donning a miniature white and blue sombrero and Mexican scarf. Bram Stoker got a small black plastic box - a makeshift coffin - decorated with cutout paper footballs, signifying the Dracula author's interest in that sport.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Cold tombstones and statues are all that memorialize great Philadelphians of the past. But several famous dead Philadelphians of the animal kingdom remain with us in the flesh - sort of. The mounted skins or skeletons of famous animals still with us include the bird believed to have inspired Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven," a four-footed hero of the Civil War, a famous killer elephant and a well-known rhinoceros. Grip, the beloved talking raven of author Charles Dickens, still stands proud and sleek in the rare book department of the Free Library of Philadelphia on Logan Square.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In an awesome display of speed and depth, Downingtown took five of the first six places at Saturday's Indian Invitational cross-country meet to easily win the girls' team title in the big school division. "I expected our top five or six girls to finish in the top 20," coach Bill Schmidt said. His runners did even better, as Allison Glitz and Colleen Costello finished one-two. Defending district champion Karen Hauck of Bishop Shanahan took third, and Downingtown's Terri DiMartini, Paula Brooke and Sarah Gardner took fourth through sixth.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
About a dozen students from Pennridge High School in East Rockhill worked for two years to create a cyber store, which made its debut last month. The electronic store, located at www.bciu.k12.pa.us/pennridge/phs/cyberstore.htm, carries a variety of sportswear, such as T-shirts, sweatshirts, scarves and visors. The clothing, which can be embroidered, is geared to students, families and alumni. Randy Swope, business department chairman, worked with students from the Future Business Leaders of America and the high school Web team to develop the site.
SPORTS
July 15, 2010 | THE INQUIRER
ALLENTOWN - Indianapolis catcher Erik Kratz might have had the best night of any player in the triple-A All-Star Game at Coca-Cola Park. Kratz was told during the fourth inning Wednesday night that he would be joining the Pittsburgh Pirates on Friday in Houston to start the second half of the season. It's the first call-up for the 30-year-old Kratz, who grew up in Telford and graduated from Christopher Dock High. He celebrated with 20 family members, including his parents, wife and children.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012
Theater B. Someday Productions: Problem Child A couple trying to get their child back from Social Services encounter a series of problems. Closes 11/17. Walking Fish Theatre, 2509 Frankford Ave.; 215-427-9255. www.bsomeday.org . $20. Cape May Stage: Poe, Times Two 1-man theatrical adaptations of the Poe stories 'The Cask of Aomontillado' & 'The Black Cat.' Closes 11/16. Robert Shackleton Playhouse, Bank & Lafayette Sts., Cape May; 609-884-1341. www.capemaystage.org . $35; $30 seniors; $15 students.
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SPORTS
September 20, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
DONTARI POE "is a bigger guy," Eagles center Jason Kelce noted this week. Yeah, you could say that. The Kansas City Chiefs' nose tackle is listed at 6-3, 346. Kelce is listed at 6-3, 295. Poe also is a dominant defensive lineman on a dominant defense. His 3 1/2 sacks lead the Chiefs, who have nine of 'em through two games. Poe also is hard to move out of running lanes, which is why Kansas City ranks second against the run. "He's a very good run-playing player," said Kelce, who had his thumb wrapped in practice this week after suffering an injury to his snapping hand against the Chargers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012
Theater B. Someday Productions: Problem Child A couple trying to get their child back from Social Services encounter a series of problems. Closes 11/17. Walking Fish Theatre, 2509 Frankford Ave.; 215-427-9255. www.bsomeday.org . $20. Cape May Stage: Poe, Times Two 1-man theatrical adaptations of the Poe stories 'The Cask of Aomontillado' & 'The Black Cat.' Closes 11/16. Robert Shackleton Playhouse, Bank & Lafayette Sts., Cape May; 609-884-1341. www.capemaystage.org . $35; $30 seniors; $15 students.
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Arielle Emmett
You wouldn't know from a reading of Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination that his dead wife showed up on stilts to dance with him one night. You wouldn't suspect from the richness of his poetry and short stories that Poe and his family were starved for calories for much of their lives. And you wouldn't guess from the bitter obituary written by his literary executor and rival Rufus Griswold - who claimed that Poe "had few or no friends" and that few would grieve for him - that his reading public not only adored Poe, but would soon elevate him to the status of dark literary god. Nothing about Poe seems obvious: not the literary squabbles that cost him the support and admiration of people who could have furthered his career; not the scandals surrounding his flirtations with drugs, booze, and married women; not even the details of his mysterious death in a Baltimore hospital.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Edgar Allan Poe's troubled life, which ended 163 years ago Sunday in Baltimore, was relatively brief, just 40 years, but his macabre stories and poems earned him a celebrity that has endured for more than a century and a half. Vividly imagined works such as "The Raven" and "The Pit and the Pendulum" made him one of the most widely illustrated authors of the 19th century. In fact, some artists who weren't primarily illustrators were inspired by his intensely gothic imagery, even into the late 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012
In my imagination, Edgar Allan Poe as a person is much the same as he's portrayed in the striking and beautifully staged Red-Eye to Havre de Grace : dark in mood, deliberate in tempo, flashing with brilliance, often broke and confused, routinely drunk. He is, in a strange sense, larger than life because he lives with a mental abandon that puts him at constant risk. That's probably one reason we don't know the details of his death, although some documentation exists about his last days on a lecture tour, many of them spent on trains and one of them in Philadelphia, where he once lived.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer
JUMATATU POE wasn't the type of kid who was sent to dance class the moment he could walk. He learned about movement socially, from what he saw at parties and on TV, not from a stern teacher with her hair in a tight bun. He didn't even take a formal class until he was at Swarthmore College, where he decided to train in contemporary African dance. There's no separation between low and high dance culture for Poe. Maybe that's why he's been able to take complex ideas about identity, space and transformation and present them using, in part, a form of dance that's been most widely experienced through Beyonce's "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Remember "The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill"? Part of that miseducation must have involved taxes.   Hill has been charged with failing to file income-tax returns for several years with the IRS, the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Jersey announced Thursday. The former member of the Fugees earned more than $1.6 million during 2005, 2006 and 2007, the three years that she failed to file returns, federal prosecutors said. If this had happened a decade earlier, she would owe a lot more.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | Tirdad Derakhshani
Singer Lauryn Hill is facing the wrath of the federal government: The U.S. Attorney's Office in Newark, N.J., has charged the former Fugees singer with three counts of willfully failing to file income-tax returns. The IRS says Hill, 37, best known for her '98 solo record, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, never paid taxes on more than $1.6?mil she made over a three-year period. Hill, who lives in South Orange, N.J., must appear in federal court June 29. She faces up to one year in prison and a $100,000 fine for each count.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
The Raven opens with Edgar Allan Poe near death on a Baltimore park bench, which conforms to what historians know about the writer's final moments. Circumstances surrounding Poe's death remain a mystery, but The Raven offers its version - we see that not long before, Poe had been trying to get money out of a newspaper publisher, which would kill just about anybody. Poe, as we learn in The Raven, was not just the genius inventor of the detective story, the proto-Goth poet, nor the swooning balladeer to the departed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
THE BEST THING about the new thriller "The Raven" is John Cusack's amped-up performance as Edgar Allan Poe. Cusack lost 30 pounds and pushed himself to the point of exhaustion to play Poe, a sometime action figure in "The Raven" who gallops on horseback through the fog and shoots guns. Cusack, however, said the really taxing aspect of the role was trying to achieve Poe's famously agitated mental state. "He was a starving writer and a pretty serious alcoholic, so I thought it was correct for him to be very lean and working on the edge.
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