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NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zaidee Harrison, the Radnor High School senior who posted a poem containing violent imagery on a friend's Facebook page three days before she was to graduate, can finally exhale. Arthur Donato Jr., her Media-based attorney, said Wednesday afternoon that all criminal charges against his client in connection with the June 12 arrest have been dropped. "I'm happy for Zaidee and the fact that this will not have an effect on her future," Donato said of Harrison, now a freshman at an undisclosed college.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's not the Da Vinci Code ," says Stephen Greenblatt, "but it tells the same story: the thrill and astonishment when something very old, something thought to be lost, forgotten, returns to the world with the potential to change it. " Greenblatt - who reads at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Central Library - is speaking of his new book, The Swerve: How the World Became Modern . He's right: Swerve isn't much like Dan Brown's ...
NEWS
September 19, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilda Schrager Silverblatt, 91, of Center City, literary executor and first cousin of Holocaust poet Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger, died of cancer Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Wissahickon Hospice in Bala Cynwyd. In 2008, an English translation of Meerbaum-Eisinger's Harvest of Blossoms: Poems From a Life Cut Short was published by Northwestern University. The book was edited by Mrs. Silverblatt's twin daughters, Helene and Irene. Written in German, the book had been published in Israel and Germany to literary acclaim.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware County judge threw out a terroristic-threat charge Tuesday against an 18-year-old who was a Radnor High School senior when arrested in June for posting a video of herself reciting a violent poem on a friend's Facebook page. But District Judge John C. Tuten, ruling in Wayne, held Zaidee Harrison for trial on a misdemeanor charge of harassment and a summary offense of disorderly conduct for making the poem public. The 30-line work includes references to shooting people and setting a fire with gasoline at school.
NEWS
August 21, 2011
By Rachel Hadas Paul Dry Books. 204 pp. $16.95 Reviewed by Frank Wilson The average life expectancy for persons born in 1900 was 47 years. Today, in the United States, it is 77 years. Today also, more than five million Americans suffer from Alzheimer's or a related form of dementia. They are not always elderly. In 2005, poet Rachel Hadas' husband, George Edwards, a composer and professor of music at Columbia University, was diagnosed with dementia. He was 61. Statistics, of course, are utterly impersonal, but it is people who fall victim to disease.
NEWS
June 18, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The attorney for a Radnor High School senior arrested in connection with a video that contained a poem with violent imagery said Friday that his client never threatened anyone. Arthur T. Donato Jr., a Media lawyer, said Zaidee S. Harrison, 18, of Wayne, did not send anything to a public or school official, faculty member, or any other public employee. Donato said she posted on her best friend's Facebook page a video of herself reciting the poem. Her friend was not threatened by the poem or its images, Donato said.
NEWS
June 17, 2011
A Radnor High School senior has been charged with making terroristic threats in a video e-mailed to a school administrator three days before graduation, according to Radnor police. Zaidee S. Harrison, 18, of Wayne, was arrested at her home Sunday after principal Mark Schellenger told police about the video, in which the teen recites a poem laced with violent images, according to the affidavit of probable cause. It starts: "Cold metal in my hands / I am at school, / I'll shoot you down, / You stupid fool.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
By Garrison Keillor Viking. 512 pp. $20.95 Reviewed by John Timpane I read hundreds of poems like these when I was coming up. I'm grateful to them. They helped get me started loving poetry. The volume at hand joins Garrison Keillor's otheranthologies, Good Poems of 2003 and Good Poems for Hard Times of 2005. Here, Keillor fills his pages with poems in which people's lives take place against the landscapes of this country. Place, scene, where it happened , are as vibrant as any human presence.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The ideal place for hearing Morton Feldman's music would seem to be a sensory deprivation tank with each note in his spare music arriving like a pebble dropped into a pond, with all the necessary time to contemplate pebble, pond, and ripple. But the third program of the American Sublime Feldman festival operated under opposite circumstances: Roughly 30 people were seated in the Biello Martin Studio in Old City Wednesday to hear poems by Frank O'Hara, a short play by Samuel Beckett, and Feldman's late-period Palais de Mari in a room that felt like a parallel-universe Victorian parlor with touches of Edward Goreyesque gothicism.
NEWS
May 1, 2011
By Gjertrud Schnackenberg Farrar Straus Giroux. 64 pp. $23 Reviewed by Frank Wilson Ingenious repetition is what shapes Gjertrud Schnackenberg's Heavenly Questions , an intensely moving elegy in six parts. The first and fourth poems, for instance, are lullabies, though not songs for one newly born, but rather for one about to die. "Archimedes Lullaby," the first, begins: A visit to the shores of lullabies, Where Archimedes, counting grains of sand, Is seated in his half-filled universe And sorting out the grains by shape and size.
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