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Poet Laureate

NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a City Hall ceremony today, Mayor Nutter announced the appointment of Frank Sherlock, 44, as the second poet laureate of Philadelphia. Sherlock succeeds Sonia Sanchez. He'll serve for two years, during which he will receive a stipend of $5,000. Duties include mentoring young poets, a couple of official readings, and community-service work. One of his first duties will be to help select a youth poet laureate, also the second, succeeding Siduri Beckman. Beth Feldman Brandt, executive director of the poet laureate governing committee, said: "This position is not just an honorary appointment.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Pulitzer Prize winner Stanley Kunitz, 95, will become the 10th poet laureate of the United States in the fall, the Library of Congress announced last week. He published his first book of poetry in 1930 and has since produced nine more. He will succeed Robert Pinsky, who has held the post for three years. The new laureate said the appointment came as a great surprise and he accepted on the assurance that he would not need to move to Washington. "The reason I decided to accept this honor is that I want to do something for the young in this country," he said.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Julia Baird
A few days ago, the Guardian in London boldly put out a list of the top 10 American poems. It was sobering reading, largely because only one of the poets is still alive. John Ashbery, a masterly wordsmith, is 83. He was born the same year as the present U.S. poet laureate, whom I am certain only a tiny percentage of us could name. Can you? Did you know we had one? It's William Stanley Merwin - a wonderful, if sometimes opaque, poet, who lived in Scranton from the age of 11, but moved to Hawaii in the 1970s.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - Poetry was apparently too controversial for Atlantic City this year, as a plan to pay poets to read their work at the city Farmers' Market was abandoned by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority after some political blowback. But Somers Point has held the line against the (haiku) haters - naming, and paying, the bay town's first poet laureate, Northwestern grad-turned-wine-store-event-planner Maria Provenzano of Egg Harbor Township. Provenzano, 26, will put the concept to its first real test Saturday night, as she does two short, mostly unannounced "Pop Up Poetry" events, one at 7 p.m. at the bar at Sandi Point Coastal Bistro, formerly the famed Mac's, followed by another at Gregory's.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | By Michael D. Schaffer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ted Hughes, revered in Britain for his literary brilliance but better known in the United States for his failed marriage to Sylvia Plath, has died in England at age 68. Mr. Hughes, the poet laureate of England, succumbed to cancer Wednesday at his home in Devon, according to an announcement from his publisher, Faber & Faber. The cancer was discovered 18 months ago, but Mr. Hughes kept the diagnosis quiet. Roger Straus, president of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Mr. Hughes' American publisher, issued a statement calling Mr. Hughes' death "a loss to all lovers of poetry on both sides of the Atlantic.
LIVING
January 10, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
THE SOUNDS OF POETRY A POETRY GUIDE BY ROBERT PINSKY FARRAR, STRAUS & GIROUX. 129 PP. $16 Everyone knows that poetry today is not a "herd" art - popular mass-market stuff, an essential ration of the near-21st-century citizen. If the sign of an unappreciated item in modern culture is that it thrives more as metaphor than as itself, then poetry - invoked by sportscasters cheering a linebacker's "poetry in motion," or pundits admiring the "Beltway poetry" of a political payback - deserves its morose self-doubt.
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may be that wherever he goes, New Jersey's poet laureate Amiri Baraka is there to oppose popular consensus. Even yesterday, as he spoke at a breakfast honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and sponsored by the Burlington County chapter of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Baraka, 68, said he never really understood Dr. King's teachings until 10 years ago. But this crowd had come to hear what Baraka had to say. So there were...
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Poet Deidra Greenleaf Allan never thought much about the ways a mother fails her children, at least not in any concrete way, until she found some bird skeletons in her attic. Seeing their tiny bones and claws and beaks made her wonder what had gone wrong. What measures did the desperate mother take to try to save her little ones in their suffocating attic prison? "I was empathizing with her, trying so hard to do good for her children," said Allan, who eventually set her thoughts to verse in a poem called History.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
O n Friday, Mayor Kenney announced that Yolanda Wisher, 39, has been named Philadelphia's poet laureate for 2016-17. She is a community activist, a teacher, and a poet deeply aware of her city and its rhythms. As an introduction to her work, here's a Phillycentric poem titled "5 South 43rd Street, Floor 2. " It's vivid, vibrant, of the streets - and yet also written in mature, 21st-century, good old iambic pentameter. Here is a poet who is a Philadelphian who is a poet. - John Timpane Sometimes we would get hungry for the neighborhood.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ed Galing gently unfolds a crumbling, yellowed piece of newspaper, tenuously held together by sallow strips of Scotch tape. It is the first piece of writing by the newly crowned poet laureate of Hatboro that appeared in a newspaper. It was published in 1945 in Stars and Stripes when Galing was a young soldier in Europe. He has come a long way. Galing was declared the poet laureate of Hatboro in late February, despite the fact that he is technically a resident of Upper Moreland.
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