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Poet Laureate

NEWS
July 21, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It offers neither a regular paycheck nor medical benefits. It is no guarantee of recognition. Nevertheless, dozens of wordsmiths brandishing thousands of stanzas want to become Bucks County's poet laureate. Bucks County, you see, is rich in poets. There's the Doylestown actress. The Langhorne mail carrier. The retired book publishing executive. The community college professor who just won a Pew Fellowship. "There just seems to be a wealth of poets here," said Stanley W. Heim, senior associate professor of English at Bucks County Community College, 1980 poet laureate, and director of the annual poet hunt.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Pulitzer Prize winner Stanley Kunitz, 95, will become the 10th poet laureate of the United States in the fall, the Library of Congress announced last week. He published his first book of poetry in 1930 and has since produced nine more. He will succeed Robert Pinsky, who has held the post for three years. The new laureate said the appointment came as a great surprise and he accepted on the assurance that he would not need to move to Washington. "The reason I decided to accept this honor is that I want to do something for the young in this country," he said.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Julia Baird
A few days ago, the Guardian in London boldly put out a list of the top 10 American poems. It was sobering reading, largely because only one of the poets is still alive. John Ashbery, a masterly wordsmith, is 83. He was born the same year as the present U.S. poet laureate, whom I am certain only a tiny percentage of us could name. Can you? Did you know we had one? It's William Stanley Merwin - a wonderful, if sometimes opaque, poet, who lived in Scranton from the age of 11, but moved to Hawaii in the 1970s.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | By Michael D. Schaffer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ted Hughes, revered in Britain for his literary brilliance but better known in the United States for his failed marriage to Sylvia Plath, has died in England at age 68. Mr. Hughes, the poet laureate of England, succumbed to cancer Wednesday at his home in Devon, according to an announcement from his publisher, Faber & Faber. The cancer was discovered 18 months ago, but Mr. Hughes kept the diagnosis quiet. Roger Straus, president of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Mr. Hughes' American publisher, issued a statement calling Mr. Hughes' death "a loss to all lovers of poetry on both sides of the Atlantic.
LIVING
January 10, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
THE SOUNDS OF POETRY A POETRY GUIDE BY ROBERT PINSKY FARRAR, STRAUS & GIROUX. 129 PP. $16 Everyone knows that poetry today is not a "herd" art - popular mass-market stuff, an essential ration of the near-21st-century citizen. If the sign of an unappreciated item in modern culture is that it thrives more as metaphor than as itself, then poetry - invoked by sportscasters cheering a linebacker's "poetry in motion," or pundits admiring the "Beltway poetry" of a political payback - deserves its morose self-doubt.
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It may be that wherever he goes, New Jersey's poet laureate Amiri Baraka is there to oppose popular consensus. Even yesterday, as he spoke at a breakfast honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and sponsored by the Burlington County chapter of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Baraka, 68, said he never really understood Dr. King's teachings until 10 years ago. But this crowd had come to hear what Baraka had to say. So there were...
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Poet Deidra Greenleaf Allan never thought much about the ways a mother fails her children, at least not in any concrete way, until she found some bird skeletons in her attic. Seeing their tiny bones and claws and beaks made her wonder what had gone wrong. What measures did the desperate mother take to try to save her little ones in their suffocating attic prison? "I was empathizing with her, trying so hard to do good for her children," said Allan, who eventually set her thoughts to verse in a poem called History.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | By Monique El-Faizy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ed Galing gently unfolds a crumbling, yellowed piece of newspaper, tenuously held together by sallow strips of Scotch tape. It is the first piece of writing by the newly crowned poet laureate of Hatboro that appeared in a newspaper. It was published in 1945 in Stars and Stripes when Galing was a young soldier in Europe. He has come a long way. Galing was declared the poet laureate of Hatboro in late February, despite the fact that he is technically a resident of Upper Moreland.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With stylish eyeglasses framing her bright, round face, a knit cap hiding her hair, and a red African scarf tumbling from her neck, 23-year-old Yolanda Wisher looks very unlike the staid image of "the old guy who writes poetry" with which she grew up. But Wisher writes poetry, too - well enough to have edged out 82 others last month to become Montgomery County's first poet laureate. And the Upper Gwynedd native - whose works draw inspiration from such disparate sources as Alice Walker, Earth Wind & Fire, and the conversations she overhears in her West Philadelphia neighborhood - plans to spend the summer teaching local students that poetry is more accessible than they might think.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A television special about the Triangle Waist Co. fire in 1911 moved Teresa Mendez-Quigley to write a poem called "Winged Victory. " Based on the reported leap of a husband and wife from a factory window in New York, the poem is Mendez-Quigley's imagined account of the couple's last moments together. "How difficult it must have been," Mendez-Quigley said last week, her sympathy rekindled as she recalled the doomed pair. "They kissed and then jumped. " Mendez-Quigley, who lives in Erdenheim, was selected recently as the 2004 Montgomery County poet laureate.
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