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Poet Laureate

NEWS
December 11, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The well runs deep for Patricia Goodrich, a retired teacher, amputee, traveler and divorcee, who taps into her life experiences for art's sake. Her creative projects, which have received international attention, spill into both the visual arts and the literary world. Most recently, Goodrich was recognized for her writings and earned the distinction of 2005 Bucks County poet laureate. "My work is pretty direct," Goodrich, 62, of Springfield Township, said. "At first, I felt I had to announce a poem and summarize it at the end. Now I know I have to trust the reader to be intelligent enough to get it. " Christopher Bursk, a literature professor who has known Goodrich since they met at a poetry workshop more than 20 years ago, called her poetry courageous.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | By Heather Moore, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jennifer Kates wraps herself in expression. In her Furlong bedroom, magazine pictures of and lyrics by divas Patti Smith, Ani DiFranco and Tori Amos and political slogans such as "Free Tibet" decorate large parts of her walls and ceiling. The words mitakuye oyasin, an American Indian blessing meaning "to all my relations," are written above her bed. The rest of the painted space is taken up by Kates' own words: Her slanted, curved print in light blue and green marker reveals the lines of her poetry to all who enter.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Strange thing, being the nation's poet laureate in an unpoetic time. What does one do? Write an elegy about the Tower nomination? A sonnet to first dog Millie? "When anyone asks what it is that I do," says Howard Nemerov, the third and current poet laureate, "I say, 'What does Oz do?' Just keep those emerald spectacles on and we'll do fine. " He is talking, between gin martinis and unfiltered cigarettes, in the spectacularly unspectacular Adam's Mark Hotel, in front of the salad bar, immersed in Muzak, waiting to address the local chapter of St. Louis' Washington University alumni association.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
"It's just an awful emptiness without him," confided dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, somber in gray suit and black turtleneck, gazing up like a chastened choirboy toward the vast nave of Manhattan's Cathedral of St. John the Divine. He was talking Friday evening about the loss felt by many friends of Joseph Brodsky, the Russian poet who came to America at age 32 after years of hardship at home. Brodsky won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1987, served as poet laureate of the United States from 1991 to 1992, then died suddenly of a heart attack on Jan. 28 at age 55. "It feels like a giant hole," Baryshnikov continued of his countryman and fellow emigre, with whom he'd bonded during their years in New York.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The county's new poet laureate was invited to the courthouse yesterday, but was asked to leave some words at home. Especially a four-letter word that refers rather explicitly to sex. Such was the case when River Huston performed her first official duty as laureate, reading a selection of her work at a public meeting of the Board of Commissioners. Huston, a New Hope resident, AIDS activist and lecturer, chose "Death Is for the Dead," a funky, personal discourse on living life with a death sentence handed down by the HIV virus.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Poetry came late but with honors to Charles Munoz. The 66-year-old retiree was an aerial gunner, a novelist, a technical writer and a marketing vice president before he began putting his lyricism on paper a couple of years ago. Last month he was named Bucks County poet laureate. If poetry is new to Munoz, writing in general is not. Now a part-time English teacher at Bucks County Community College, Munoz has written a novel (and has two more underway) and TV scripts, as well as science fiction and technical articles.
NEWS
May 21, 2006 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What does it mean to be a poet laureate? Elkins Park resident Deborah Fries was thinking about that recently after being named the 2006 poet laureate of Montgomery County. Already, Fries has fulfilled some of her duties. She accepted her award at Arcadia University, thanked the panel of judges headed by Pulitzer Prize-winner Galway Kinnell, and did an inaugural reading. Now it is on to other things, she said: workshops, a few readings, and "representing the poetry community in a place where I live and work and where so many good writers find space and inspiration.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A poet's pen is really a pickax, chip, chip, chipping away at some hidden mine of memory or intellect or experience, digging out the precious nugget that will gleam with truth. Lansdale poet Margaret Almon's mine is marbled with rich veins of her girlhood in Alberta, Canada. From it emerge poignant observations on stifled dreams, family mythology and what it means to grow up as a woman, with occasional forays into history and the natural world. Recently, Almon's verse earned her the title of Montgomery County poet laureate.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before appearing on a local TV show recently, River Huston, Bucks County's poet laureate, asked the host to - please - not introduce her as the woman some New Jersey parents have called obscene. Huston is trying to get past the high-publicity incident that involved parents' harsh reaction after she graphically demonstrated how to use a condom at a high school assembly. The event landed her on national TV programs such as Day and Date and Good Morning America. It was memorialized on the cover of a Trenton tabloid newspaper, laminated and hung on her kitchen wall: RAUNCHY DEMOS AT SAFE SEX TALK, the headline screams in bold red. But Huston, 36, a Bucks County native, doesn't want that image to define her. Nor would she introduce herself as the woman reproached last year by Bucks County commissioners.
NEWS
February 6, 2016
A story Friday on new Philadelphia poet laureate Yolanda Wisher misstated the day on which Mayor Kenney would announce her appointment. The event took place Friday.
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