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Poetic Justice

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NEWS
March 15, 2007
DURING THE PEAK of British imperial power, Rudyard Kipling penned the poem "Tommy" about the attitude of the British ruling class toward their troops, both during hostilities and in the aftermath. History is replete with the ill treatment of heroic troops, from Victorian England to the American bonus marchers of the 1930s - with the exception of American World War II veterans who received the thanks of a grateful nation in the form of the GI Bill of Rights. In the present day, the veterans' reward for horrible sacrifices has been to be kicked to the curb.
SPORTS
February 9, 1987 | By PHIL JASNER, Daily News Sports Writer
There was poetry in the way they played yesterday's NBA All-Star Game. Poetry. Grace. Skill. Charisma. A sport that has gone beyond itself. Julius Erving, at 36, in his 16th and last All-Star Game, was the thread, linking basketball as it was to basketball as it has become. The sky-walkers sky higher, faster, more frequently now. They contort, unfurl, extend, create, gyrate. Doctor J, halfway through his final professional season, is the root of all that they have become. In a schedule crammed with tributes to him, yesterday emerged as a portion of his tribute in return.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1993 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Filmmaker John Singleton and cinematographer Peter Lyons Collister use a, let's say, visually arresting technique to introduce one character in the new movie Poetic Justice. There is no warning. Just an image. The camera focuses on a pair of long mahogany legs and moves slowly upward from those legs and then upward along the painted-on-tight, but expensive, red dress, and the body it claims to cover. That fine lady is standing next to a brand-new blue Lexus. The inscription on the California vanity license plate: MS BOOTIE.
SPORTS
November 12, 1991 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Eagles recovered the fumble that opened the last door to victory in Sunday's dramatic football game with the Cleveland Browns, free safety Wes Hopkins threw off his green parka and ran out on the field to see who had the ball with his own eyes. Some things are just too good to be true. Hopkins had watched with disbelief on the frigid sidelines, hopping from foot to foot, trying to keep warm, as that hotdog Browns receiver, Webster Slaughter, wandered back, back, back to the goal line under Jeff Feagles' monumental 61-yard punt.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Poetic Justice" provides a graphic depiction of why your mail is late. It's the story of a postal worker assigned to deliver mail from L.A. to Oakland. He relieves the monotony by taking along three friends. They stop frequently - for booze, picnics, sex, visits to relatives and other whimsical adventures - but never to deliver mail. (Not once do they stop for rain, snow, sleet hail or gloom of night, so technically he's OK.) "Poetic Justice" is a road movie/love story from John Singleton, who made a splashy debut with the urban youth drama "Boyz N the Hood.
NEWS
July 18, 2001
IRA EINHORN is nothing more than an actor. In the '60s, Einhorn was a hippie messiah wannabe. Last week, he looked like a demonic figure when he made a superficial suicide attempt to avoid extradition for killing his girlfriend. After 24 years, poetic justice will be served and the natural law will prevail. Just like the beatniks who eventually became the establishment, everything in time comes full circle. Stuart M. Burgh Jr., Philadelphia
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Jewels, furs and other trinkets confiscated from dope peddlers brought more than $75,000 into federal coffers yesterday at an auction at the Holiday Inn, 4th and Arch streets. The sale was conducted by the General Services Administration for the Marshal's Service. "It was wild," said Daniel Orr, administrative officer for the Marshal's Service in Philadelphia. "We had about 250 people show up, and we sold almost everything above the wholesale value. " By law, those who lost their goods couldn't buy them back at the auction.
NEWS
February 12, 1987
I think it's poetic justice that a judge has finally been mugged without anyone lending a hand to help. Maybe this is a second- or third-time offender whom some judge has let out of jail or given a light sentence? Between the lawmakers, "smart" lawyers, parole boards and judges in our land, untold thousands of innocent people have suffered at the hands of muggers, rapists and murderers. They are just as guilty as the multiple offenders they keep putting back on the streets.
NEWS
December 6, 2004
OF ALL THE CABINET members now leaving the Bush White House, none had a tougher job, with the exception of Colin Powell, than former Gov. Tom Ridge. Brought on board to head the Department of Homeland Security shortly after 9/11, Ridge had the daunting task of running a brand-new department tasked with protecting the country, but one that had little clout. He also had the job of projecting a calm presence to a jittery nation. It was an impossible job, but Ridge did it to the best of his ability.
NEWS
March 23, 1991
Mayor Goode is right. If Thomas A. Mills insists on staying in the race for City Council in the 10th District, he should resign his seat on the Board of Education. State law does not prohibit a school board member from running for political office, so it's not illegal for Mills to stay in the Democratic primary contest for the nomination to oppose Republican incumbent Brian O'Neill in the fall. But the school board is no place for a candidate for another office. It politicizes the board - which has a lot of problems, but partisan politics has not been one of them.
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NEWS
May 24, 2013
THERE ARE MANY kinds of desperation, as many as the stars above and the souls beneath them. The death of a child, the disintegration of a marriage, homes lost to floodwaters and whirlwinds, all of these things can drive you to - and beyond - the point of suicide. And yet, there are sources of strength as varied as the sorrow. For one man, that source was found in unwritten words, tapped out on prison walls and shared with his captured brothers in Vietnam. Major Gen. John Borling, a 6 1/2-year "guest" at the infamous Hanoi Hilton is, like Joyce Kilmer and Wilfred Own, a soldier-poet.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I just saw on the TV news that women are getting their toes cut off to fit into high heels. Great idea! I'm wondering if I should cut off my butt to fit into my jeans. This being Thanksgiving weekend, after turkey, stuffing, and pie, you might be thinking the same thing. In fact, I bet you are. You probably woke up wondering, what can I hack off to fit into something I don't wear? So don't put away that carving knife. Put it to good use! I'm still trying to imagine how you carve out a waist.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 6:30 on a Sunday morning, and Rich Horan was on his way to the baseball field. Horan was en route to his home field at Audubon before most folks opened their eyes on April 29 to help prepare the site for the consolation and championship games of the Ralph Shaw Classic. Horan, 56, still loves everything about the sport - the practices and games but also the field preparation and pregame and postgame rituals that are so much a part of baseball. "I'm a baseball lifer," Horan said.
NEWS
January 3, 2012
Mayor Nutter has added another feather to Philadelphia's cultural cap by naming Sonia Sanchez its first poet laureate. Nutter announced the idea of creating a poet laureate program in May, during a Sanchez reading at City Hall. A committee that included novelist Lorene Cary recommended Sanchez, a natural choice. A teacher, mentor, activist, and humanitarian as well as a poet, Sanchez, 77, has long been regarded as the city's unofficial poet laureate. But now the job is truly hers.
SPORTS
July 5, 2011
TIMBER!!!!!!!! That's the sound they will be hearing Friday at Pat Croce's Greate Bay Country Club in Somers Point, N.J., just outside Ocean City. It seems that Flyers legend Bob Clarke will be cutting down a tree that has been bugging him for way too long. But he's earned the right. And it's for a worthy cause. The piece of wood in question towers over one side of the fifth fairway. Over the years, it has disrupted many of his tee shots. So last season the club left its fate up to the members, in the form of a fund-raising drive to benefit First Tee of Greater Atlantic City.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010
ARIES (March 21-April 19). The only thing better than doing your work well is doing your work well in front of people. Take in the applause. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You'll encounter an unforeseen snag. Fear not: Your skills haven't left you, and this bramble will be behind you. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). The hurdles between where you are and where you want to be only matter if you let them. If you keep your eyes on the goal, you won't even see them. CANCER (June 22-July 22)
SPORTS
December 6, 2009 | By Matt Gelb / Inquirer Staff Writer
TODAY Buccaneers (1-10) at Panthers (4-7) 1 p.m., Bank of America Stadium Line: Panthers by 5 1/2 Tampa Bay has just one win to show for it, but Josh Freeman has played better as he learns life in the NFL. The rookie threw for 250 yards and two touchdowns in a near-upset of Atlanta last week. With few dependable weapons around him, Freeman has made progress. Carolina's Jake Delhomme has 18 picks in 11 games and could miss this game with a broken finger. Enter Matt Moore.
NEWS
March 15, 2007
DURING THE PEAK of British imperial power, Rudyard Kipling penned the poem "Tommy" about the attitude of the British ruling class toward their troops, both during hostilities and in the aftermath. History is replete with the ill treatment of heroic troops, from Victorian England to the American bonus marchers of the 1930s - with the exception of American World War II veterans who received the thanks of a grateful nation in the form of the GI Bill of Rights. In the present day, the veterans' reward for horrible sacrifices has been to be kicked to the curb.
SPORTS
January 22, 2007 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally. It took exactly 59 excruciatingly competitive minutes last night, but when the Indianapolis Colts finally wrestled the lead from the New England Patriots, they didn't let it go. Not this time. No chance. The Colts are going to the Super Bowl, and Peyton Manning is the reason why. It was poetic justice - and one of the all-time greatest conference title games ever played offensively. Neither team could stop the other until Marlin Jackson picked off a Tom Brady pass in the final minute to solidify the Colts' 38-34 victory and set off a raucous celebration inside the RCA Dome.
NEWS
December 6, 2004
OF ALL THE CABINET members now leaving the Bush White House, none had a tougher job, with the exception of Colin Powell, than former Gov. Tom Ridge. Brought on board to head the Department of Homeland Security shortly after 9/11, Ridge had the daunting task of running a brand-new department tasked with protecting the country, but one that had little clout. He also had the job of projecting a calm presence to a jittery nation. It was an impossible job, but Ridge did it to the best of his ability.
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