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NEWS
April 9, 2002
War has a way of pushing passions beyond the battlefield's physical boundaries. That's important to remember, because hatred can grow in the absence of efforts to promote understanding. This week's series of events sponsored by the Philadelphia area's Jewish Americans and Arab Americans is just such a worthwhile effort. The events started Sunday at a Sufi mosque on Overbrook Avenue, where about 100 people - Muslims, Jews and Christians - came to read poetry and talk about peace against the backdrop of Middle East fighting.
NEWS
April 19, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Polite, respectful and friendly are words often used to describe Thomas, 16. Like other teenagers, he enjoys a variety of activities including playing basketball and baseball, running track, riding his bike, listening to rap music, going to movies, and spending time with his friends. He recently started rock climbing. A sophomore in high school, his favorite classes are gym, especially swimming, and English, because he likes writing poetry. One of his poems was published in the school magazine.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An organization dedicated to poetic wit, whimsy, and wordsmithery was celebrating its birthday, and the short verse by Kenny Milanese spoke volumes. I love the Society / I love it a lot / Without the Society / I would be not. You see, Milanese's father and mother met and fell in love at the Society for Poets of Southern New Jersey. Anthony and Lynette Milanese got married in 1990, and their son, 21, is the group's next-to-youngest member. So the society's 35th anniversary party Friday was very much a family affair.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | By Janet Poland, Special to The Inquirer
The faces around the seminar table in Phyllis Girard's cramped classroom were transfixed. On the video screen was an elderly man named Stanley Kunitz, one of America's leading contemporary poets, reading from his work. My mother never forgave my father for killing himself, especially at such an awkward time and in a public park, that spring when I was waiting to be born. The juniors and seniors in Girard's gifted class at Bristol Junior-Senior High School were viewing an introductory tape in a series called Poetvision: Poets on Tape for Schools.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Michelle Pellemans, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Luray Gross thinks kids are going too fast, and she is trying to slow them down - with poetry. In a world where the constant onslaught of noise, sounds, and images leaves little time for "feeling," Gross is challenging the children to slow down, take it easy, let their senses roam and enjoy. And for four days last month, the fourth graders at Berlin Township's Eisenhower Elementary School did just that. They participated in a program called "Artists in Residence," a venture under the auspices of the State Council of the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, in which artists such as Gross travel to schools throughout the state and spend time exposing students to their areas of expertise.
NEWS
February 14, 2003 | By Mary Esselman and Elizabeth Velez
As if love weren't confusing enough, this year we're faced not only with the usual Valentine's Day hype but also with the ultimate in anti-romance, shows like The Bachelorette, Joe Millionaire, and Are You Hot? This is the "reality" of true love in 2003? Ten-pound chocolates, diamonds-and-thigh-highs-are-forever ads, and a bunch of brain-dead, money-grubbing exhibitionists competing to win America's heart? Impossible. Surely we long for something else. Deep down we must know that Valentine's Day is a crock, and Joe Millionaire is a happy idiot.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
To the list of favorite poets read in Addie Toleno's sixth-grade classes, one was added yesterday: Julius. Julius, a former resident of a Philadelphia shelter, was one of eight men the shelter has helped who came to thank Toleno's class at Medford's Memorial Middle School for bringing donations of clothing and food each month. As his personal way of giving thanks, Julius - a former street person who lived until recently at My Brother's House, a shelter on South 15th Street in Philadelphia - read the students selections from "Poetry in Motion," a mimeographed booklet containing some of the more than 100 samples of free-form verse he has written.
NEWS
October 23, 2003 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sylvia trumpets its true subject in the opening frames. "Dying Is an art, like everything else," Gwyneth Paltrow quotes, in a narcotic monotone, from poet Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus. " "I do it exceptionally well. I do it so it feels like hell. I do it so it feels real. I guess you could say I've a call. " And from that moment, the movie, which opens nationally tomorrow, storms toward its inexorable conclusion - Plath, with a folded tea towel on which to rest her troubled head, and a waiting stove.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
ANNE SEXTON A Biography By Diane Wood Middlebrook Houghton Mifflin. 488 pp. $24.95 'There is a popular notion, " observed interviewer Patricia Marx to poet Anne Sexton in 1965, "that creative genius is very close to insanity. " Citing the psychological troubles of major poets such as Robert Lowell and Theodore Roethke, Marx asked, "Do you feel there's truth in this notion?" "Well," replied the well-known veteran of breakdowns, suicide attempts and general dysfunction, "their genius is more important than their disease.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were the Associated Press, United Press International and USA Today.)
Robert Penn Warren, who in February became America's first poet laureate, gave the first public reading under his new mantle yesterday and used the occasion in Washington to lament the standing of poetry in contemporary education. He said that schools today gave "no general education" in poetry and that students often weren't even exposed to it "unless they have a special interest in it. " The three-time Pulitzer Prize winner said he didn't know if the new title would boost American interest in the literary form.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016
Joshua J. Whitfield is the parochial vicar and director of faith formation and education at St. Rita Catholic Church in Dallas Winnie-the-Pooh, you may remember from childhood, was quite a poet, a rhymer, and writer of songs. Once for instance, he sang of the gallantry of Piglet, but Piglet could hardly believe it: "Did I really do all that?" he asked incredulously, after hearing of his bravery in song. "Well," Pooh answered, "in poetry - in a piece of poetry - well, you did it, because the poetry says you did. And that's how people know.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016 | Alexandra Villarreal, STAFF WRITER
You taught them too well How to silence that which they think beneath them, And you are not on top anymore. You have told them they are roadblock. There will be hell to pay when they realize they are breakthrough. At a news conference at the Art Gallery at City Hall on Thursday afternoon, a smiling Otter Jung-Allen, 16, read the poem "You Have Not Gagged Them. " Jung-Allen was announced as the city's fourth-ever Youth Poet. A senior at Science Leadership Academy, Jung-Allen begins the one-year laureateship immediately.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
A YOUNG mother gives up her newborn baby boy for adoption only months before her own high school graduation. The mother is 17. Nearly 50 years later, the mother, Victoria Huggins Peurifoy, tells the story in a letter to a son she saw only once. In a poem based off a family photograph, which includes a little girl, Carol Richardson McCullough writes of the sister she never met. The toddler died before McCullough was born. These are samples of the stories and poems collected in two new books, Anthology 2 and Portraits Through Time.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Patrick Rosal resides at many cultural intersections. You can find it in his poetry, you see it in his Filipino heritage, and you hear it in his vernacular. And that's how he likes it. Rosal, a poet and professor at Rutgers-Camden, just finished Brooklyn Antediluvian , his fourth book of poetry, slated for release on May 3. As the title indicates, his book addresses many kinds of flood: Hurricane Katrina; Tropical Storm Ondoy, which hit the Philippines in 2009; the emotional flood after a breakup; living in Brooklyn amid the flood of gentrification.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Dreams are the bridge between our subconscious and our reality; they also can become a bridge between us. On Friday at the Perelman Theater, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts hosts the Philadelphia premiere of Holding It Down: The Veterans' Dream Project , created by Grammy-nominated pianist-composer Vijay Iyer and poet Mike Ladd. A multidisciplinary show featuring music, poetry, and video monologues created from the dreams of veterans, the project premiered at Harlem Stage in 2012 and was made into a 2013 album.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
Braving the cold, five poets (and one dog) huddled outside the Green Line Cafe in West Philadelphia late Friday night to kick off Philly Poetry Day. At their urging, Leonard Gontarek, the event's founder and organizer, broke the ice with the night's first reading. Next up was William Burrison, a local playwright, who had written a poem for the chilly occasion. He tilted his paper toward the dim light and started reading: It's cold on the corner / Will the next trolley that comes bring spring with it?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
One day, as National Poetry Month came slouching toward Philadelphia, Larry Robin and the folks at Moonstone Arts Center had a bunch of bright ideas: Count all the places in Philadelphia that do poetry. It's a big poetry town, but how big exactly? Publish a Philly poetry newspaper listing them and all the great stuff happening for Poetry Month in this poetry town. Throw a big poetry weekend with a huge number of events, so you go from one to another and have a wonderful time.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
The Facebook message from my high school friend was the first thing I saw this morning: "I don't know if you've heard ... we lost Phife Dawg. A legend. RIP. " In any debate about who the best emcees are, my answer is always A Tribe Called Quest. Always. Yes, Kane was smooth. Sure, Rakim was nice. Nas was ai'ght. But I was a Tribe fan all day every day. That's because Tribe spoke to me. Back in the early 1990s, hip hop was beginning its transition to gangsta rap. But while Ice Cube and his crew were saying "F- the Police," my fellow Queens boys - Phife Dawg, Q-tip, Ali Shaheed Muhammad, and Jarobi - were creating a genre of hip-hop with tight jazz beats that were lyrically sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Playwright Nicky Silver has grown up. His 2014 play, Too Much Sun , is a mature expression of his signature tragic view, retaining his barbed wit, quirkily motivated characters, and near-poetic style. You won't catch all these elements, however, in the current uneven staging by Isis Productions. Silver's play opens on aging actress Audrey (Renée Richman-Weisband) rehearsing Medea in Chicago. Her garish costume (courtesy of designer Bobby Fabulous) and debilitating red stage lights (Bill McKinlay)
NEWS
January 31, 2016
The word is out: Reading is far from dead. Fully 571 million books were sold in 2015 - sold, do you hear? - 17 million more than in 2014, according to Nielsen BookScan. More, do you hear? And the paper book, so long taken for dead, rose up and declared, "I remain": Electronic books are a big part of the market, at 25 percent, but the growth of their market share has leveled off. And, anyway, they're welcome. Reading is reading. And since we're all reading, here are some of the best titles soon to spring upon us in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.
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