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NEWS
April 2, 1987 | BY PAUL GREENBERG
Beware politicians quoting poetry. Beware especially those politicians who misquote poetry. Just before announcing he would run for president, Gov. Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts chose to add a touch of class to his act by citing some lines of poetry he had taken the licence of rewriting: The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But we have promises to keep, And miles to go before we sleep, And miles to go before we sleep. Governor Dukakis compounded his act by pausing dramatically, then adding: "This is the poetry of Robert Frost.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | By John Timpane Commentary Page Editor
This particular miracle is a little more than a month old - and growing. It has the texture of the human voice, the flexible flight of the human mind. Like a gardener in the green, I've been tending it and learning. Within hours of the televised destruction of the World Trade Center towers and the lives therein, poems started coming in to us here at the paper. And they just kept coming and coming, from men, women, children (youngest so far: 6), adolescents, seniors (oldest so far: 87)
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DONATO DiCRISTINO could never turn anyone away. "He was a great listener," said his sister, Dia DiCristino. "I would ask him if he couldn't see through a person, and keep his distance. But he gave everyone the benefit of the doubt. "As a result, he was surrounded by a circle of people from all walks of life, including people who were down on their luck, whom he always tried to help. " Donato, a native South Philadelphian and a dedicated writer and poet, had been living for the last 3 1/2 years in Austin, Texas, where his sister feared that he "let his guard down even lower and became more susceptible to negative forces.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Love Mother Earth. Attend the Pennsylvania Resources Council "Artists' Tribute to the Environment" at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Environmental Living Center in Edgmont. This Earth Day event will feature woodworks, paintings, sculpture, floral designs, decorative art and "critters" made from recyclable materials, as well as poetry and special Earth Day readings. Admission is free. The Living Center is at 3606 Providence Rd. Call 610-353-1555. Marty's Musical Moments comes to the Upper Darby Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. tonight.
NEWS
April 10, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If you thought the hotel-room wrestling scene in Borat was extreme (and extremely funny), check out Taxidermia. This wild, multigenerational saga from Hungary's Gyorgy Palfi makes Sacha Baron Cohen's potty-humored faux-doc look like a kid's trip to the candy store. Visually dazzling and outlandishly obscene, Taxidermia begins in old Red Army days, with a lowly orderly prowling around the farmhouse of his lieutenant, spying on the officer's daughters as they undress and bathe. After a not-to-be-believed scene that brings new meaning to the phrase "hot sex," the orderly Vendel beds (in a manner of speaking)
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jessica Thom, who admires the writings of Sylvia Plath, Carl Sandburg and Robert Frost, is Bucks County's 2003 high school poet of the year. Thom, who will be a senior at Central Bucks East High School in Buckingham, won the $400 top prize in the poet-laureate program coordinated by Bucks County Community College. Entries came from 185 high school students throughout the county. "I try to keep my poetry short and to the point, not too obscure, easy for everyone to understand," said Thom, who writes about family, friends and relationships.
NEWS
October 7, 1997 | By Malcolm Garcia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ten-year-old Andris Mezgailis turned the Matisse postcard over and over in his hands before he began to write. The card showed a painting by the 19th-century French artist called Icarus, from Jazz. Icarus, a character from Greek mythology, tried to fly but fell into the sea and drowned when the wax on his artificial wings melted after he got too close to the sun. The Matisse painting showed a blue figure flailing against the sky, a splash of red spotting his chest. Andris wrote slowly, carefully, in looping pencil script, his impressions of the picture.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the regulars funnel into the pizza parlor, Rocky Wilson greets them with a high-pitched voice and a monkey sock puppet. "Helloooo!" he says, exchanging hugs and pleasantries (switching back and forth between his normal and puppet voice). It's Wednesday night in downtown Camden, and Wilson has turned off the TVs in the pizzeria's small dining room, draped a leopard-print cloth over a bright light fixture to cast a warmer glow over the room, and placed a stack of poetry books on a center table.
NEWS
April 24, 2011
By Louis Zukofsky New Directions. 846 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Bob Perelman The reissue of Louis Zukofsky's long poem "A" is a most welcome event. In the innovative regions of the poetic universe, Zukofsky is a major presence: Thanks to the enthusiasm of figures such as Robert Creeley, Robert Duncan, and the Language poets, there now is a population of admirers who will be glad "A " is back in print. For most of Zukofsky's career such an outcome would have seemed highly implausible.
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