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Poetry

NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Tom Quinlan calls her "one of the great wonders of the Western world. " Her name was Sister Marie St. Joseph, and she was a nun who taught fourth grade at St. Bartholomew's School in Wissinoming. Every Friday afternoon, she would pull out a little green book. "She would read great poetry, Longfellow and Kipling, people of that nature, and she did it with such depth and such feeling," Quinlan recalls. Every once in a while, when she was called to the office, she would ask a student to take her place.
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aylisha Brown has been writing poems since age 16, when she found it the best way to make sense of her crazy world. One of her first poems was included in a news story about her mother, Crystal Brown - a narrative of tragedy and triumph - published in The Inquirer in 2006. It was then that Aylisha learned that her biological father was also her grandfather, that her mother had long been abused by her father, and that that relationship had caused the progressive genetic disease leaving Aylisha in a wheelchair.
NEWS
November 17, 2012
Libya question The writer of the letter "Questions that need answers" (Tuesday) posed interesting questions that journalists need to ask of former CIA Director David Petraeus. Although the list of questions is thoughtful, another significant one needs to be added: Did Petraeus' testimony to the House Intelligence Committee about the attack on Benghazi relate to the pending disclosure about his affair? Given Petraeus' sterling military career and fine reputation as CIA chief, his strange support of the White House theory that the attack was a spontaneous demonstration is shockingly disingenuous.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
November 11 will forever remind Dorothy Blair of the Armistice Day celebration her beloved uncle captured on paper in 1918. Thomas Staller Edwards was 19 and at work in Center City when news arrived that World War I had ended. "When the mad crowd went rushing and roaring past . . . I completely lost my head. I grabbed all the papers from my desk and dumped them out the window," he wrote. "I wanted to kiss someone. I ran out on Chestnut St. and kissed all the pretty girls.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
Stolen Air The Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam Selected and translated by Christian Wiman Introduction by Ilya Kaminsky Ecco. 128 pp. $15.99 Reviewed by Frank Wilson   This is a book not simply to read, but also to treasure. It takes the form of a triptych, Ilya Kaminsky's introduction ("Osip Mandelstam: A Lyric Voice" and Christian Wiman's translator's note ("Secret Hearing") bracketing Osip Mandelstam's poems. Kaminsky's introduction is itself a kind of prose poem, which is hardly surprising.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernhardt "Bernie" Blumenthal, 75, a graduate of LaSalle University who chaired the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures there for more than 40 years and wrote poetry in German, died of cancer Monday, Sept. 24, at home in Philadelphia's East Oak Lane section. "He was a magnificent teacher and a great editor," said Leo Rudnytzky, a friend and colleague who also taught German at LaSalle. "He was a consummate stylist with great editorial skills. His great love was German poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Kenneth, 17, has many interests and participates in a variety of activities. Very energetic and athletic, he likes sports and plays basketball and volleyball. Music is also a big part of his life. He plays the guitar and recently started taking piano lessons. Kenneth's creative side is evident from his skillful drawings and the poetry he writes. Friendly, respectful, and courteous, he rarely has a problem in his foster placement or at school. Kenneth does well in school in regular education classes, maintaining a B average.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
One of the most popular City Hall topics in recent years has been Mayor Nutter's relationship with City Council and its 17 varied personalities and motivations. Mostly, the conversations boil down to who's winning and who's losing the political game. Last week, Council sought out a new arena where the combatants could wage this particular warfare. The challenge to Nutter and his administration arrived in a missive from Majority Leader Curtis Jones Jr. It read: On this day: the 10th of July, We extend this challenge, and anticipate your reply.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Every e-mail from Philadelphia poet and provocateur CA Conrad ends with this note: "I AM SO HAPPY!!!!!!!! My real life has exceeded my dreams. " Conrad, 46, has plenty of reasons to be overjoyed. His oversized book, A Beautiful Marsupial Afternoon, was just released during April's Poetry Month through the prestigious Wave Books imprint, in time for a reading tour through the South. The new work is a follow-up to the highly acclaimed, startling The Book of Frank, the Whitman-esque The City Real & Imagined: Philadelphia Poems, cowritten with Conrad's pal Frank Sherlock, and Advanced Elvis Course, the Soft Skull press effort that put Conrad on the national map with its gay Presley riffs and taunting, effortless humor.
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