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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The art of letter-writing has shrunk to a narrow niche, but for the majority of human history it offered the only viable way to connect and continue communication over long distances. Some miss the format; I imagine playwright Sarah Ruhl is among them. Her 2012 Dear Elizabeth , now in a fine, if surface-level, production by People's Light and Theatre, dramatizes the 30-year stream of letters between American poets Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop. I can understand Ruhl's impulse to enshrine their letters.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
The room settled to quiet as Jean C. Higgins took her place behind the lecturn. There was silent pride in her eyes as she flipped through the sheets of paper before her and settled on her opening poem. "My Beautiful Garden," she said confidently, and began to read. A gold pocket watch dangled from her neck and glimmered against her blue dress. Sunday, the day the Chester County Chapter of the Pennsylvania Poetry Society chose for its annual public reading, was also the local launch of National Poetry Month.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Ted Rosenberg of Elkins Park loves to turn his lens on poets. His homage to them will result in a picture-book next year. Meanwhile, the photographer is showing his work-in-progress on this coast-to-coast project in a display at Abington Art Center. This American poets series might have been a dutiful exercise to make poets a bit more visible in our midst. But Rosenberg identifies quite strongly with subjects he observes, something uncommon among even those photographers who are artists.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
When the revolution came, South African poet Willie Kgositile proclaimed, there would be no time for poets. "The only poem you will hear will be the spearpoint pivoted in the punctured marrow of the villain," he declared in a work that's quoted anew as the "Invocation" of "The Last Poets," (Ryko, 1/2). Thus came the original inspiration for the Last Poets, born on Malcolm X day in 1968 as the last lunge before the grand attack. Underappreciated (and censored by most communications media)
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
The moon played shy, peeking from behind the clouds like a child from behind a mother's skirts, but those who had gathered in its honor remained undaunted. The Full Moon Poetry Walk took place as scheduled Tuesday night in Rose Tree Park near Media, just as it does every month, cooperative moon or not. Ethereal image aside, poets are a hardy breed, willing to slosh through downpours, sink thigh-high in snow drifts, bathe in sticky humidity or shiver amid the timbers in order to gather in one another's company and absorb one another's words.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
Sweden will issue a commemorative booklet honoring two of its poets, another booklet on the centennial of papermaking, and a high-value castle definitive. The commemoratives and definitive will be issued Wednesday. Carl Michael Bellman and Evert Taube are being honored on three stamps each in a booklet of six. Each stamp is valued at 2.50 kronor. Bellman (1740-1795) was a writer and poet. His favorite theme was the lifestyle of a character named Fredman and his friends in 18th-century Stockholm and their accounts of drinking, poverty, prostitution and revelry.
NEWS
November 14, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Composers often reach outside their own cultures for new creative vistas, from Beethoven's seizing upon trivial tunes as the basis for his Diabelli Variations to Paul Simon's drawing his best music from South African soil. Yet with composers John Harbison's and Bernard Rands' setting lesbian poets to music at Network for New Music's Sunday concert, the ultimate question - in this era of cultural ownership, when artistic communities reserve the right for special-interest groups to tell their own stories - isn't just about musical quality but making cross-cultural sense.
NEWS
July 4, 2016
Faleeha Hassan is a poet living in Washington Township The world needs poets more than it needs politicians. The country I come from made me say this. I am the one who has been living, since my adolescence, a series of wars. One was the Iraq-Iran war, which the Iraqi government believed it was going to end in 10 days. They even closed our schools, thinking that 10 days is enough to end a border dispute. That war lasted eight years. It would kill all my male friends who enrolled in the army as they turned 18. Their mothers got the remains of their bodies in boxes of wood wrapped in the flag of Iraq.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's a poet supposed to look like? Larry Leissner wondered just that. "My idea is long hair and peace symbols all over," speculated Leissner, 17, a senior at Frankford High School, Wakeling Street and Oxford Avenue. In the school library, Soviet poets Alexander Tkachenko and Frieda Lurie looked nothing like that. Neither Lurie, a gray-haired, plump grandmotherly type, nor Tkachenko, 43, short-haired and sporting a Penn State sweater, showed off any peace symbols. But they did emphasize peace, speaking of glasnost and common bonds between two countries - theirs and ours.
NEWS
October 24, 1986 | By Georgie Anne Geyer
Pittsburgh gleams in the clear autumn sunlight. The city of smokestacks was cleaned up years ago. But something spiritual gleams here, too. Pittsburgh, paradoxically, has become America's city of poetry. Nowhere was that clearer than last Sunday night when the International Poetry Forum celebrated its 20th anniversary in the glorious Carnegie Music Hall with hundreds of people. Six of America's greatest poets read, and Jerzy Kosinski was the master of ceremonies. Many might dismiss this as simply another "culture evening," but it was far more than that.
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NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, STAFF WRITER
SURF CITY, N.J. - What happens when you tell a poet to write a poem from a painting, and an artist to paint from a poem? Will the interpretive work be more or less interesting than the poet's original poem? Will the painting created from a poetic prompt be more provocative than the painting created from the artist's own muses? Will the random pairing of poets and painters be inspired? Or forced? Like a cooking show where the ingredients are given to the chefs, or maybe an artistic version of "Who Wore It Best," the third annual Painted Poetry exhibit packs impressively expansive questions about the creative process, about inspirations, about the idea of interpretation, about whether art can be enhanced by words and vice versa, into a show squeezed into a meeting room of the Long Beach Island branch of the Ocean County Library.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
BORN AT THE START of the Great Depression in 1929, Pauline King Blakney grew up in a family of strivers, business owners and civic-minded people who made sure their children were exposed to music, art, and cultural opportunities. Ms. Blakney, 87, who sang opera as a teenager and won an award for her painting as a young woman, died Saturday, July 30, at her home in Northeast Philadelphia. She was among the first African Americans to be hired by John Wanamaker and the very first to be hired locally at an F.W. Woolworth Co. store, family members said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016 | Alexandra Villarreal, STAFF WRITER
You taught them too well How to silence that which they think beneath them, And you are not on top anymore. You have told them they are roadblock. There will be hell to pay when they realize they are breakthrough. At a news conference at the Art Gallery at City Hall on Thursday afternoon, a smiling Otter Jung-Allen, 16, read the poem "You Have Not Gagged Them. " Jung-Allen was announced as the city's fourth-ever Youth Poet. A senior at Science Leadership Academy, Jung-Allen begins the one-year laureateship immediately.
NEWS
July 4, 2016
Faleeha Hassan is a poet living in Washington Township The world needs poets more than it needs politicians. The country I come from made me say this. I am the one who has been living, since my adolescence, a series of wars. One was the Iraq-Iran war, which the Iraqi government believed it was going to end in 10 days. They even closed our schools, thinking that 10 days is enough to end a border dispute. That war lasted eight years. It would kill all my male friends who enrolled in the army as they turned 18. Their mothers got the remains of their bodies in boxes of wood wrapped in the flag of Iraq.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A memorial service and poetry reading will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 12, to mark the death last month of Daniel Abdal-Hayy Moore, the Sufi poet, essayist, artist, and playwright. Mr. Abdal-Hayy Moore, 75, of Philadelphia, died Monday, April 18, after a lengthy battle with cancer. As the disease progressed, he wrote about it in a poem titled Fancy Dancer . In part, the poem reads: The cancer I've been dancing with (and cancer's a fancy dancer) has overcome its scruples and wants to marry me. I've rebuffed it once or twice now but its piteous face puckers and tears fills its eyes with the thought of losing me.   A protégé of Beat poets Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Allen Ginsberg, Mr. Abdal-Hayy Moore first came to light in San Francisco with publication of his poetic collections Dawn Visions (City Lights, 1964)
NEWS
May 2, 2016
I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world - Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" Michelle Myers is an associate professor of English at the Community College of Philadelphia and host of the Emmy-nominated "Drop the Mic" show on CCPTV I love my students. I accept them for who they are in the moment that I meet them, the moment during which our journeys through our respective lives intersect. I accept that they have had experiences that I cannot ever imagine or know, and that these experiences have made them profoundly beautiful people in their own right.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Patrick Rosal resides at many cultural intersections. You can find it in his poetry, you see it in his Filipino heritage, and you hear it in his vernacular. And that's how he likes it. Rosal, a poet and professor at Rutgers-Camden, just finished Brooklyn Antediluvian , his fourth book of poetry, slated for release on May 3. As the title indicates, his book addresses many kinds of flood: Hurricane Katrina; Tropical Storm Ondoy, which hit the Philippines in 2009; the emotional flood after a breakup; living in Brooklyn amid the flood of gentrification.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
A s yet another National Poetry Month winds down, I find myself asking the same question: Who'd want to become a professional poet? Is that even a job? Why enter that racket in the first place? Certainly not for fame and fortune. Poetry may be the single art form that won't make you rich. Some actors get rich (Robert Downey Jr. made $80 million last year) as do some novelists (Nicholas Spark, anyone?) and teenage singers. Even painters can rack up a big payday, though it usually helps if they're dead.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
A.V. Christie, 53, of Malvern, a Philadelphia-area poet and teacher, died of breast cancer Thursday, April 7, at the Neighborhood Health Inpatient Hospice at Chester County Hospital in West Chester. Ms. Christie was born in Redwood City, Calif., and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, Montana, and British Columbia. She was a graduate of Vassar College, where she studied with the writers Eamon Grennan and Nancy Willard, and received her master of fine arts degree from the University of Maryland, studying with the poet Stanley Plumly.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Helping the Morning New and Selected Poems By Jeanne Murray Walker WordFarm. 273 pp. $22 Reviewed by Frank Wilson There is little point in beating around the bush: Jeanne Murray Walker's Helping the Morning is an outstanding collection of poems. In an afterword titled "Why Read Poetry?," Walker writes that "what really baffles me is why I am so prone to do exactly what I don't want to do. And I don't get why we humans keep opting for war. Other mysteries drive me crazy, too. " They prompt, she says, "the questions that finally drive me to God. " As with any living faith, that on display here has little to do with theological abstractions and everything to do with everyday reality.
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