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January 28, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Walter Hodge scored a career-high 19 points, Nick Calathes had 15 points, 10 assists and seven rebounds, and host Florida used a huge first-half run to beat No. 14 Vanderbilt, 86-64, yesterday. The victory could land the two-time defending national champions (18-3, 5-1 Southeastern Conference) back in the Associated Press Top 25 for the first time since late November. But coach Billy Donovan would prefer his young and inexperienced team stay out of the national spotlight. "It's like poison," Donovan said.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Pigeons may be safe for the time being on Delaware River Port Authority bridges, but they're still sitting ducks at PATCO High-Speed Line stations. The authority, which bowed to pressure from animal lovers and agreed to spend considerable time and money searching for ways to rid its bridges of pigeons without poison, ruffled the feathers of the same group yesterday when it refused to stop using poison at high-speed line stations. The authority backed off in November when the Women's SPCA in Philadelphia protested plans to hire an exterminator to poison birds making a mess on the Ben Franklin and Walt Whitman bridges.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Guess what, everybody? Poison's got the blues. Last night at the Spectrum, Bret Michaels, lead singer of this quartet of Pennsylvanians, stood in front of the near-sellout crowd brandishing a harmonica. Explaining that he had been practicing for a while, he proceeded to blow a blues riff that the rest of the group soon joined. The jam turned into "Poor Boy Blues," a number from Poison's latest album, Flesh and Blood (Capitol). Of course, it wasn't the blues this mostly mid- to late-teen crowd came to hear.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Holbrook Mohr, Associated Press
JACKSON, Miss. - The key ingredient - castor beans - is easy to find. Crude instructions for extracting the lethal poison in them can be found on the Internet. And it doesn't require a chemistry degree or sophisticated lab equipment. The FBI is investigating at least three cases over the last month and a half in which ricin was mailed to President Obama and other public figures. Ricin has been sent to officials sporadically over the years, but experts say that there seems to be a recent uptick and that copycat attacks - made possible by the relative ease of extracting the poison - may be the reason.
NEWS
October 13, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A teenage boy and his stepsister who are accused of mixing household cleaners into their parents' iced tea are scheduled to be arraigned this afternoon in Family Court on charges of aggravated assault. The boy and the girl, both 15, were arrested Saturday afternoon after the mother noticed a strong smell coming from her iced tea before she drank it, police said. Police were analyzing the tea to determine what chemicals it contained. The teenagers, whose names were withheld by police, tried to poison their parents after being disciplined for a party the youths held last week, authorities said.
NEWS
May 6, 2012 | By Alex Dominguez, Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the former Soviet Union leader, a UCLA neurologist said Friday. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the death of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have reexamined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar, and Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
April 15, 2008
A Cherry Hill woman pleaded guilty to attempted murder yesterday, admitting that she tried to poison her husband by mixing antifreeze and cyanide in his meals. Karen Tubertini, 47, accepted a plea agreement with the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office in the attempted killing of Ronald Tubertini, 50, a retired Lumberton Township police officer. The Prosecutor's Office will dismiss a count of reckless endangerment under the agreement, Deputy First Assistant Prosecutor James Ronca said.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | Daily News staff report
There was another dramatic chapter yesterday in the saga of the Bucks County tainted-taters case. Richlandtown housewife and former janitor Heather Marie Miller, 26, fell backward after she was sentenced to the state slammer for 4-1/2 to 10 years. Miller, who was luckily caught by a sheriff's deputy, had pleaded with the judge to be sent to the county jail so she could be close to her four young children. But Bucks County Judge David W. Heckler read Miller the riot act for planning to poison her husband.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
YEARLY trick-or-treat safety guides urge parents to keenly scan each candy wrapper to spot signs of hidden poisons or razor blades. But has any kid ever actually been hurt or killed by a nefarious neighbor's ricin-laced Snickers? Joel Best, a University of Delaware sociology and criminal-justice professor, found that the candy-coated threat is about as likely as real vampires and witches going door-to-door each Oct. 31. He has studied newspaper articles going back 25 years, looking for the sensational tale of a child collapsing after eating a handful of poison Skittles.
NEWS
May 3, 2003 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County jury concluded last night that the case against a Main Line homeowner accused of poisoning his pool workers did not hold enough water. After deliberating for almost five hours, jurors said they had doubts that Salvatore "Sam" Miluzzo Jr., 64, of Berwyn, spiked a pitcher of water with algicide before serving it to five plasterers working on his pool on June 11. Miluzzo, who had been charged with five counts each of simple assault and reckless endangerment, wept as the not-guilty verdicts were read at 9:30 p.m. During closing arguments, defense attorney Daniel R. Bush scoffed at the prosecution's evidence, suggesting that the five laborers feigned illness to avoid work and get money out of Miluzzo.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 27, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC HEALTH Let's call a cigarette a cigarette I applaud the Food and Drug Administration's recent ruling to ban e-cigarette sales to minors and require safety reviews for vaping products ("Thank you for not vaping?" May 17). Like traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain nicotine, an extremely addictive substance. And e-cigarette products have been found to contain harmful chemicals than can cause respiratory disease. Should we be asking the public to "pick their poison," or should we be educating them that no matter what type of cigarette they smoke, they are putting their health at risk?
NEWS
May 1, 2016
Poisonous By Allison Brennan Minotaur 368 pp. $25.99 Reviewed by Oline H. Cogdill In Allison Brennan's well-plotted Poisonous , the poison in question seeps through a town and decimates a family. It starts with a teenager's penchant for Internet bullying. Ivy Lake's venom almost ruined the lives of several teenagers, possibly pushed the family of one teen to move, and, saddest of all, may have caused a bright, sensitive girl to commit suicide.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
New Jersey legislators are trying to correct an oversight in the state's environmental laws, which do not require schools to regularly test their water for lead. Unacceptable levels of lead have been found in the water at 30 of Newark's 67 public schools, which have shut down their water fountains. The discovery raises questions about water quality in schools around the state. A bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Sens. Ron Rice and Teresa Ruiz (both D., Essex)
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Kevin C. Osterhoudt
Every great drama has a hero, a villain, and a victim. Perhaps that is why the lead contamination of the Flint, Mich., water supply has captured the nation's attention. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is the noble pediatrician credited with battling bureaucracy to expose the haunting truth, the government is the wrongdoer accused of malfeasance and a cover-up, and thousands of innocent children have been put in harm's way. In the aftermath, celebrities and politicians are speaking out about this newly discovered social injustice, and money is flowing in. But don't be misled by the current frenzy: Lead poisoning has been harming children for more than a century, and deteriorating lead house paint remains the greatest threat.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The national uproar over lead poisoning in Flint, Mich., has drawn renewed attention to a children's health crisis that has plagued Pennsylvania and New Jersey for decades. The states' own data show that 18 cities in Pennsylvania and 11 in New Jersey may have an even higher share of children with dangerously elevated levels of lead than does Flint. The states' reports, released in 2014, were recirculated this week by health advocates trying to draw attention to the lead problem. "We're not to trying to take anything away from Flint," said Elyse Pivnick, director of environmental health for Isles Inc., a community development organization based in Trenton.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The vocalist known as Jade Starling is not making a comeback. "We never left," insists the dance-pop singer/songwriter, currently savoring her best chart numbers since "Catch Me I'm Falling" landed her band Pretty Poison in the Top 10 in 1987. "I'm enjoying success again, but there were songs in between," Starling says. "We've been making music. We had some other singles out. We actually were on the charts a few times. " A personable, polished professional who's a South Jersey girl and proud of it, thank you, Starling met me two weeks ago at the DaStudio Recording Complex in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
September 29, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera and Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pope Francis met Sunday night with a Delaware family of four who were poisoned by a pesticide used in the condominium building where they stayed while on vacation in the Virgin Islands in March. The unannounced encounter took place in the Atlantic Aviation terminal at Philadelphia International Airport before the pontiff boarded his plane for the trip home The pope kissed and blessed the family, said Brian Tierney, whose communications company handled media for the World Meeting of Families.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FIVE AMERICAN Airlines workers have accused the airline of using watercooler jugs to carry chemicals aboard planes to decontaminate lavatories - and then returning the jugs to commercial circulation to be refilled with drinking water and redistributed. In a lawsuit filed Monday in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, the workers say the practice - known as "top-filling" - began in 2010 after the airline took over cleaning its own lavatories from an outside contractor. Normally, workers attach hoses from lavatory trucks on the tarmac to a parked plane's underbelly to pump toilet waste down into a container on the trucks, according to the lawsuit.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
Like fine wine, Jade Starling just gets better and better with age. Pun intended, but "Better and Better" is a song off Starling's new hit album, which just landed in the No. 24 spot on the August Billboard Top 100 dance chart. Starling has been a musician with Pretty Poison since the early 1980s. Her new stuff has the benefit of authorship from longtime writing partner Whey Cooler, who's also credited with helping Pretty Poison reach its great success.  Now, Starling is promoting her new, much anticipated solo debut, "Captive.
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