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SPORTS
January 28, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Walter Hodge scored a career-high 19 points, Nick Calathes had 15 points, 10 assists and seven rebounds, and host Florida used a huge first-half run to beat No. 14 Vanderbilt, 86-64, yesterday. The victory could land the two-time defending national champions (18-3, 5-1 Southeastern Conference) back in the Associated Press Top 25 for the first time since late November. But coach Billy Donovan would prefer his young and inexperienced team stay out of the national spotlight. "It's like poison," Donovan said.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Holbrook Mohr, Associated Press
JACKSON, Miss. - The key ingredient - castor beans - is easy to find. Crude instructions for extracting the lethal poison in them can be found on the Internet. And it doesn't require a chemistry degree or sophisticated lab equipment. The FBI is investigating at least three cases over the last month and a half in which ricin was mailed to President Obama and other public figures. Ricin has been sent to officials sporadically over the years, but experts say that there seems to be a recent uptick and that copycat attacks - made possible by the relative ease of extracting the poison - may be the reason.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Pigeons may be safe for the time being on Delaware River Port Authority bridges, but they're still sitting ducks at PATCO High-Speed Line stations. The authority, which bowed to pressure from animal lovers and agreed to spend considerable time and money searching for ways to rid its bridges of pigeons without poison, ruffled the feathers of the same group yesterday when it refused to stop using poison at high-speed line stations. The authority backed off in November when the Women's SPCA in Philadelphia protested plans to hire an exterminator to poison birds making a mess on the Ben Franklin and Walt Whitman bridges.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Guess what, everybody? Poison's got the blues. Last night at the Spectrum, Bret Michaels, lead singer of this quartet of Pennsylvanians, stood in front of the near-sellout crowd brandishing a harmonica. Explaining that he had been practicing for a while, he proceeded to blow a blues riff that the rest of the group soon joined. The jam turned into "Poor Boy Blues," a number from Poison's latest album, Flesh and Blood (Capitol). Of course, it wasn't the blues this mostly mid- to late-teen crowd came to hear.
NEWS
May 6, 2012 | By Alex Dominguez, Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the former Soviet Union leader, a UCLA neurologist said Friday. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the death of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have reexamined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar, and Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
October 13, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A teenage boy and his stepsister who are accused of mixing household cleaners into their parents' iced tea are scheduled to be arraigned this afternoon in Family Court on charges of aggravated assault. The boy and the girl, both 15, were arrested Saturday afternoon after the mother noticed a strong smell coming from her iced tea before she drank it, police said. Police were analyzing the tea to determine what chemicals it contained. The teenagers, whose names were withheld by police, tried to poison their parents after being disciplined for a party the youths held last week, authorities said.
NEWS
April 15, 2008
A Cherry Hill woman pleaded guilty to attempted murder yesterday, admitting that she tried to poison her husband by mixing antifreeze and cyanide in his meals. Karen Tubertini, 47, accepted a plea agreement with the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office in the attempted killing of Ronald Tubertini, 50, a retired Lumberton Township police officer. The Prosecutor's Office will dismiss a count of reckless endangerment under the agreement, Deputy First Assistant Prosecutor James Ronca said.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | Daily News staff report
There was another dramatic chapter yesterday in the saga of the Bucks County tainted-taters case. Richlandtown housewife and former janitor Heather Marie Miller, 26, fell backward after she was sentenced to the state slammer for 4-1/2 to 10 years. Miller, who was luckily caught by a sheriff's deputy, had pleaded with the judge to be sent to the county jail so she could be close to her four young children. But Bucks County Judge David W. Heckler read Miller the riot act for planning to poison her husband.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
YEARLY trick-or-treat safety guides urge parents to keenly scan each candy wrapper to spot signs of hidden poisons or razor blades. But has any kid ever actually been hurt or killed by a nefarious neighbor's ricin-laced Snickers? Joel Best, a University of Delaware sociology and criminal-justice professor, found that the candy-coated threat is about as likely as real vampires and witches going door-to-door each Oct. 31. He has studied newspaper articles going back 25 years, looking for the sensational tale of a child collapsing after eating a handful of poison Skittles.
NEWS
May 3, 2003 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County jury concluded last night that the case against a Main Line homeowner accused of poisoning his pool workers did not hold enough water. After deliberating for almost five hours, jurors said they had doubts that Salvatore "Sam" Miluzzo Jr., 64, of Berwyn, spiked a pitcher of water with algicide before serving it to five plasterers working on his pool on June 11. Miluzzo, who had been charged with five counts each of simple assault and reckless endangerment, wept as the not-guilty verdicts were read at 9:30 p.m. During closing arguments, defense attorney Daniel R. Bush scoffed at the prosecution's evidence, suggesting that the five laborers feigned illness to avoid work and get money out of Miluzzo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
Like fine wine, Jade Starling just gets better and better with age. Pun intended, but "Better and Better" is a song off Starling's new hit album, which just landed in the No. 24 spot on the August Billboard Top 100 dance chart. Starling has been a musician with Pretty Poison since the early 1980s. Her new stuff has the benefit of authorship from longtime writing partner Whey Cooler, who's also credited with helping Pretty Poison reach its great success.  Now, Starling is promoting her new, much anticipated solo debut, "Captive.
NEWS
June 25, 2015
IN A BLACK AND WHITE world, the bad guys are locked up in prison and the good guys are on the outside, living blemish-free lives. But the world has never been black and white, and the issue of who gets locked up in jail has become increasingly gray over the past few decades, even as the prison population has exploded by a factor of four in as many decades. The fact is that who gets locked up is not inscribed in the Constitution. Society and its shifting mores has always determined who gets jailed - including the 17th century when people could be imprisoned for incurring debts.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Dr. Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
A 45-year-old man came to see me because of a rash on his nose. It had appeared the day before. It hurt a little and itched a bit, though it was more annoying than anything else. He had no other skin concerns and felt fine otherwise. No fevers, chills, night sweats, or weight loss. Nothing. I examined the skin on his nose: There were perfectly demarcated oval patches of redness on the sides of both nostrils, completely symmetrical. There was some blistering and yellowish crusting, as well.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When preparing food at home, do you: Clean sponges with soap to kill bacteria after wiping up drippings on countertops? Cover Tupperware containers when cooling hot food in the fridge? Rinse chicken in the sink? All not good. "Washing a sponge with soap doesn't get rid of bacteria," said microbiologist Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgia's Center for Food Safety. They grow at room temperature and get spread around anything else you wipe off. "Put the sponge in a microwave for one minute to kill the salmonella and other bacteria," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
No Bey for Obama girls! Malia and Sasha Obama 's brains will rot - and their souls will be claimed by Mephistopheles - if they continue listening to Beyoncé 's devil music. That's the gist of a sermon delivered by the nation's conscience Mike Huckabee , via People mag. Yes, it's election season, and Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor who many say is poised to run for the White House in '16, is making points with his GOP base by sizing up the White House's morals - and finding them wanting.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chesterbrook drugmaker Auxilium Pharmaceuticals responded Wednesday to an unsolicited takeover offer from Endo International P.L.C. by saying it would look at the offer, as required by financial regulations, but also would institute a poison-pill stock-dividend plan to ward off Endo. Endo valued the cash-and-stock offer at $28.10 per share, or $2.2 billion, but it did not specify how much of that total was stock and how much was cash. Endo chief executive officer Rajiv De Silva sent the takeover letter to Auxilium CEO Adrian Adams on Friday night, then went public with the offer Tuesday after the stock market closed in New York.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
With the exception of a slightly sore thumb, Carol Anne Bond's attempt to poison her husband's mistress missed the mark. But the Lansdale microbiologist's potion - mixed from chemicals gleaned from her workplace, at Rohm & Haas, and, alarmingly enough, some browsing on Amazon.com - had an intoxicating effect on the Supreme Court. Not only did Bond v. United States culminate last week in a Supreme Court opinion loaded with unappetizing references to toxic burritos and poisoned fish.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Gusoff had what Umar Mycka calls "a yard full of trouble" at her Bustleton home. It wasn't so much the honeysuckle, mulberries, bittersweet, chokecherries, and English ivy, although they can be a nasty business. No, it was all those shiny, three-leaf shoots of Toxicodendron radicans, the dreaded poison ivy. Mycka knows this North American scourge intimately from four decades of work as a gardener/groundskeeper at the Philadelphia Zoo. Since 2008, he has also had a small business (idontwantpoisonivy.com)
NEWS
April 4, 2014
I'M NOT going to win any friends with this column. Some will doubt my sincerity, others will think I've gone over to the dark side (and no pun intended when you figure out where I'm heading). In the past few weeks, we've lost two exceptional players from the team that - let's be honest - has the tightest hold on our civic hearts, the Eagles. One was a casualty of his aging body and free agency, and while it hurt some of us to see him go, the departure wasn't a sick-to-the-gut surprise.
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Cabin fever is taking hold across a huge chunk of the country these days. In communities such as mine, where plowing is what you do to the north 40 in early spring and salt is shaken only on food, confinement because of icy streets and sidewalks can be prolonged. And long-term confinement increases exposure to many household dangers, especially carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas produced when any carbon-based fuel is burned. Quoting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Deborah Hanson of alarm maker First Alert says carbon monoxide poisoning "puts more than 20,000 people in the hospital and is responsible for nearly 450 deaths every year.
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