CollectionsPoison Ivy
IN THE NEWS

Poison Ivy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | by David Hinckley, New York Daily News
Q: We just moved to a new house, and a hedge on the border of our lawn is overgrown with poison ivy. I am extremely allergic to poison ivy. The previous owner ripped it all out last year, but now it is back. My husband wants to use a poison spray on it, but I want us to be organic in our new home. Do you have any advice? Nancy Logue (via e-mail) A: Yes - tell your husband this is his big chance to be a major-league, testosterone-fueled, gen-you-whine Garden Cowboy! Any old wimpy thing can go spray poison around.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Ah, spring. Time to clean up the back yard, rip out those weeds, tiptoe through the tulips and scratch, scratch, scratch. That's because weekend weeders are already showing up at dermatologists' offices with poison ivy. "Everybody knows to watch out for an ivy with three shiny leaves that appear in clusters of three, but in the early spring, they may fail to recognize poison ivy in the spring when its old leaves are withered," said...
FOOD
August 4, 1993 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: Is there any way I can get rid of poison ivy without poisoning myself in the process? - Steve The best way to eradicate the awful stuff is to pour boiling water directly on each plant. Leave the plant there for a few days to make sure it is thoroughly dead and then, wearing protective leather gloves, either pry or dig it up. Do NOT burn. Discard the plants either in plastic trash bags or in a pile far away from the house. If, while you are doing the boiling water trick, you come into contact with the poison ivy, run straight to the house and wash the area with vinegar.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Gusoff had what Umar Mycka calls "a yard full of trouble" at her Bustleton home. It wasn't so much the honeysuckle, mulberries, bittersweet, chokecherries, and English ivy, although they can be a nasty business. No, it was all those shiny, three-leaf shoots of Toxicodendron radicans, the dreaded poison ivy. Mycka knows this North American scourge intimately from four decades of work as a gardener/groundskeeper at the Philadelphia Zoo. Since 2008, he has also had a small business (idontwantpoisonivy.com)
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
The good news is that spring is here. The bad news is that along with the greening of the landscape is the reddening of many inhabitants - from poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The good news is that, contrary to popular belief, you cannot "catch" the wet, itchy rash from other people. The bad news is just about everything else that has to do with the noxious plants. For starters, 70 percent of the population of the United States is genetically susceptible to the rash caused by exposure to poison ivy, oak and sumac, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Never mind that Atlantic City will be underwater and the rest of us blown away by hurricanes. Here's another threat associated with global warming: giant poison ivy vines. And for those who come in contact with them, a more vigorous version of the horrendously itchy and ugly rash. For decades, foresters have noted the increased abundance of woody vines. They suspected rising levels of carbon dioxide, which fuels photosynthesis. Now, researchers who spent six years monitoring plots of poison ivy in the Duke University forest - to their eventual discomfort - have proved it. Lead researcher Jacqueline E. Mohan was a Duke doctoral student when she picked poison ivy for her study because, as only a scientist might say, it is "a very special type of plant.
LIVING
June 20, 1994 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andy James' right forearm bulges as he lifts and carries the ladder at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, his T-shirt and jeans are soaked with sweat, and his skin, polished to a shine, shows off the muscle definition. But when confronted by leaves lying on the ground, he shrinks. He asks Eddie Williams, twice his age and no glistening forearm muscles, to take command and lead the charge. "He's one of the people that just don't get it," said James, 31, shaking his head at Williams' immunity.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
"Leaves of three, let them be" is sound advice to help you avoid the dreaded poison ivy plant. But what about those times you break out in the characteristic blistering rash without having touched a single leaf? And is poison ivy contagious? "There are many popular misconceptions about poison ivy and poison oak, which predominate on the East Coast, and poison sumac, which tends to grow in swampy areas," says Dr. Bill H. Halmi, a dermatologist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Jefferson Park Hospital.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
On a sunny May afternoon, dressed for the heat in shorts and a T-shirt, I yanked stubborn vines from long-ignored trees and shrubs, making way for a new flower bed. After four hours of effort, I felt pretty pleased with the result. Those good feelings, however, didn't last. About 85 percent of the population is allergic to poison ivy, and 10 percent to 15 percent are extremely allergic, according to the American Skin Association. I learned that I fell squarely in the second camp.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
Upper Merion Township is going to the goats - "Green goats," that is. About two dozen of the little ruminants have been brought in to chow down on invasive and unwanted vegetation at Bob White Park at Falcon Road in King of Prussia, the township said. The goats will roam within a fenced-in enclosure and are expected to devour about 95 percent of the unwanted plants less than six feet tall - roots included - including poison ivy, sumac, and any type of plant with thorns. "We're really happy to be here," said Larry Cihanek, founder of the "Green Goats" program.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
On a sunny May afternoon, dressed for the heat in shorts and a T-shirt, I yanked stubborn vines from long-ignored trees and shrubs, making way for a new flower bed. After four hours of effort, I felt pretty pleased with the result. Those good feelings, however, didn't last. About 85 percent of the population is allergic to poison ivy, and 10 percent to 15 percent are extremely allergic, according to the American Skin Association. I learned that I fell squarely in the second camp.
NEWS
March 29, 2015 | By Dr. Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
  There's an important rule in medicine: don't treat members of your family. It's a good rule, and I'm pretty good about following it. I would never go so far as to prescribe controlled substances for a family member, but it's hard to avoid offering a diagnosis from time to time. My husband got out of the shower one day and began drying off his back. "Ouch!" he said. "What's wrong?" I asked. "Something hurts. " I looked at the skin of his back. There was nothing there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | By Steve and Mia
Q: A couple of weeks ago my husband (whom I love dearly) and I attended my college reunion. While there, I ran into a former lover (also married), whom I hadn't seen in 25 years. I'd had only one or two drinks but it became clear that we were both still wildly sexually attracted to each other. We exchanged numbers. I've been sick and guilty about it ever since, because I didn't tell my husband and because I'm obsessed with seeing this man again - just to catch up. Can you help? Steve: What could possibly go wrong?
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Dennis Nippins, 6, of Maple Shade, was in his third week of kindergarten when an angry red rash appeared on his right ankle. The rash at first resembled poison ivy but without the typical fluid-filled pustules. It turned into a wider circular pattern, then bubbled up into welts that eventually became scabs. Once the scabs vanished, the cycle started again. At the pediatrician's, the doctor diagnosed poison ivy. But four visits later, the rash remained on the boy's ankles and had spread to his arms, legs, face, scalp-even the inside of his ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Refresh houseplants. It's warm enough to move houseplants outdoors to the deck, patio or a bare spot in the garden. Even if you can only garden indoors, take time to check each plant to see what "refreshment" - repotting, fertilizing, pruning - is needed. If roots reach through drain holes, transplant to a container three to six inches larger in diameter. Add enough fresh potting soil in the bottom and sides, positioning the plant's soil surface to be at the same level as in the previous container.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Gusoff had what Umar Mycka calls "a yard full of trouble" at her Bustleton home. It wasn't so much the honeysuckle, mulberries, bittersweet, chokecherries, and English ivy, although they can be a nasty business. No, it was all those shiny, three-leaf shoots of Toxicodendron radicans, the dreaded poison ivy. Mycka knows this North American scourge intimately from four decades of work as a gardener/groundskeeper at the Philadelphia Zoo. Since 2008, he has also had a small business (idontwantpoisonivy.com)
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new grounds crew workers at Haverford College have four legs and voracious appetites. The small Quaker college is using a herd of goats from Eco-Goats in Maryland to pare back an overgrown tract filled with a thicket of invasive vines and shrubs. The herd of 29 living lawn mowers arrived last Monday and will stay until the end of the week, munching its way through an impenetrable 11/2 acres across from the duck pond on College Lane. "They'll work their way in and clean it up," said Bill Astifan, assistant director of the campus arboretum, the oldest in the nation.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in a series of occasional articles about the regional effects of climate change and how we're coping.   Even though she'd been walking in the woods for only a few minutes, Jen McIntyre was in distress. Tears were running down her cheeks. She couldn't breathe through her nose. "I feel like this is our new reality," McIntyre said recently of the allergies that have begun to plague her. McIntyre, 43, of Mount Airy, never had allergies, aside from reactions to the odd dog or horse.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|