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NEWS
February 23, 1990
Now, Poland, there's a union town . . . er, country. So what's the Marriott Corp., that avowedly non-union hotel chain, doing opening the country's first Western-managed hotel? Just paying the workers at the Warsaw Marriott better-than-average wages while feeding them two meals a day - not to mention bringing in desperately needed foreign currency for the Polish government. The company's boost to the local economy also extends to the contracts it has signed with Polish farmers, fishermen and a brewery to ensure a steady stream of local provisions.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In an effort to calm Polish fears of a powerful, reunified Germany, President Bush yesterday told Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki that "Poland must have a voice" in any international decisions "affecting the fate of Poland. " Bush's statement - the broadest commitment the United States has made to a major Polish role in determining the shape of a new Europe - was made in a White House ceremony welcoming Poland's first non-communist prime minister since World War II. Talks later between Bush and Mazowiecki focused on Poland's fears that a reunified Germany might try to claim territory ceded to Poland by Germany after World War II. Moreover, Poland wants a greater role than it has been granted in international discussions about German reunification.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Poland is finding that introducing democracy and capitalism is easier said than done, according to Polish diplomat Zbigniew Kudas, who described Poland as a nation where events are changing faster than attitudes. Although change in Poland has become irreversible, Poles must now become accustomed to the complexities of elections and free enterprise, said Kudas, who addressed a crowd of 100 people at Camden County College last Wednesday. "You also have a transition of minds," said Kudas, first secretary of the Polish Embassy in Washington.
NEWS
December 23, 1986
I came back three weeks ago after two years in Poland and was greeted as a returning war veteran. I wondered why until I read a Dec. 14 front-page headline. "A struggle for survival grips Poles" may catch the reader's attention, but it does not capture the atmosphere in Warsaw. In a sense it is equally apt for Philadelphia. I imagine there are mothers here who also cannot afford to buy winter shoes for their children. Sure, Poles have less than Americans. Acquiring simple things like toilet paper is an art and important things like an apartment for some seem next to impossible, but life is not "a struggle for simple existence.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Poland yesterday called the terms of a U.S. offer of emergency milk "arrogant and abusive," and countered with a pledge of 5,000 blankets and sleeping bags for New York's "many thousands of homeless who sleep in the streets. " The U.S. government has offered to send Poland 50,000 tons of powdered milk to replace milk that might have been contaminated because of the Soviet nuclear accident. But yesterday, Jerzy Urban, a spokesman for the Polish government, assailed a May 6 U.S. Senate resolution urging that the milk be distributed through Polish church and charitable groups, rather than by the Communist government, to make sure it was given out without political considerations.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1990 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade of struggle for freedom and democracy will bear fruit in Poland this year. Poland is getting cable television. Yes, it's cable television for a nation in which less than a quarter of the households have telephones but 98 percent have television sets, according to the joint venture that will build the nationwide cable system. Cable television for a country where the only two broadcast channels - both government-owned - each operates about 12 hours a day. And, true to the capitalist system their nation is adopting, Poles will pay a lot for the new service, perhaps as much as $22 a month in a country where the average monthly income per person is less than $200.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - The daughters of a Yiddish writer persecuted under communism reclaimed copies of his works Tuesday after a prolonged legal fight with a Polish archive. The letters, newspaper articles, and poems by Naftali Herts Kon, whose real name was Jakub Serf, were deposited with the Warsaw Archives by communist authorities after he was sentenced to prison on fabricated charges in 1963. After 15 months in confinement, Kon left for Israel, where he died in 1971. On Tuesday, his daughters received the papers - in 15 folders.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Solidarity trade union movement, suppressed for years with its leaders sometimes imprisoned, now governs Poland after the abdication of the ruling Communist Party yesterday - a voluntary passage of power unthinkable only months ago. Tadeusz Mazowiecki, 62, the editor of Solidarity's weekly magazine and who was interned for a year during martial law in 1980-81, was asked formally last night to fashion a new government by President Wojciech Jaruzelski,...
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush this summer will make the first visit to Hungary by a U.S. president and will stop in Poland to show American approval of reforms in Eastern Europe, the White House said yesterday. White House officials said Bush would visit the two countries, which are at the cutting edge of change in Eastern Europe, in mid-July before heading to Paris to attend the annual economic summit of Western industrial powers. Bush might add Yugoslavia to his itinerary, the White House said.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Renee Wright began the spring semester at Bodine High School for International Affairs by teaching Eastern European geography to her 10th-grade class, and discussing how the new openness will affect the former Soviet bloc countries. On Sunday, the former student-teacher will start to find out about Eastern Europe firsthand as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English in Poland. And she'll be making history, as well, as one of the first 120 Peace Corps volunteers dispatched anywhere in Europe.
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NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK LUTZ didn't know how to quit. After serving as an educator all over the world - Philadelphia, Montgomery County, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Poland - he was teaching cartooning at an adult learning center. In fact, he was preparing a lesson plan for the course when he died June 29 at age 92. He lived in Mount Laurel, N.J. "He would exhaust you and me and five other people," said his son, Barry Lutz. "He didn't sleep. " After 30 years in Africa, and pushing 70, Jack decided to join the Peace Corps and taught college in Poland for several more years.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN The "great son of Poland" received a powerful affirmation of sainthood from parishioners at St. Joseph's Church in Camden on Sunday. The church - the unofficial seat of the Catholic Polish community in South Jersey - said a celebratory Mass for about 800 people in honor of the canonization of Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII. Regular Masses draw about an eighth as many to the church, founded in 1892 in the Whitman Park section. "We come to celebrate something of great joy and great importance: that we have two new saints," said Bishop Dennis Sullivan, who presided at the Mass.
SPORTS
September 6, 2013
TAY JONES, Saint Joseph's leading scorer the last three seasons, is going to play professionally in Poland. His season begins in October. C.J. Aiken, who left after his junior season with 319 blocked shots, has been invited to training camp with the Sacramento Kings. SJU has three other former players who will be continuing their careers overseas during the upcoming season. Darrin Govens, who played last season in Israel, is going to Greece. Pat Calathes, who had played in Greece and Israel, will be playing in Kazakstan.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His grandfather escaped from the Treblinka death camp, his grandmother died there. Decades later, when Witold "Vic" Walczak returned to his family's native Poland, a young man amid the Solidarity protests of the 1980s, he got knocked around and strip-searched by police. "At that point, I knew I wanted to be a civil liberties attorney," said Walczak, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania. Today, Walczak helps lead the legal fight for what is fast becoming Pennsylvania's preeminent civil rights issue: gay marriage.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
Thatcher foes mark her death LONDON - Hundreds of opponents of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher partied in London's Trafalgar Square to celebrate her death, sipping Champagne and chanting "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead. " Thatcher's most strident critics had long vowed to gather in central London on the Saturday following her passing. The former leader died Monday at 87. The mood appeared festive and the celebration was peaceful. There was one minor scuffle with police, who said they made nine arrests, most for drunkenness.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A husband and wife from central Pennsylvania filed suit in Bucks County Court on Wednesday, claiming that the woman was abused by a priest from the Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa in Doylestown, and that the Philadelphia Archdiocese, the shrine, and its priests, the Pauline Fathers, allowed the priest to flee to Poland after she reported the incident. The suit claims the Rev. Marek Lacki befriended the couple - parents of eight children - at a weekend retreat in March 2012, then encouraged the wife to visit the shrine for private counseling.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Vanessa Gera, Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - A U.S. plan to deploy missile defense interceptors to Poland and Romania has been a source of assurance to Washington's allies, who welcome further integration in a key U.S. security system. Meanwhile, it has infuriated Russia, which sees the interceptors as a threat and has cited them to block cooperation on nuclear arms reductions and other issues. So some might have expected the Russians to be relieved and the Poles to express anxiety at a plan announced last week by U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, which effectively cancels plans to put long-term interceptors in Poland in the next decade.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - The daughters of a Yiddish writer persecuted under communism reclaimed copies of his works Tuesday after a prolonged legal fight with a Polish archive. The letters, newspaper articles, and poems by Naftali Herts Kon, whose real name was Jakub Serf, were deposited with the Warsaw Archives by communist authorities after he was sentenced to prison on fabricated charges in 1963. After 15 months in confinement, Kon left for Israel, where he died in 1971. On Tuesday, his daughters received the papers - in 15 folders.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
WHENEVER the Catholic Church grabs her periodic moment in the spotlight, you can be assured to read a story about (a) the sex-abuse scandal, (b) the evils of mandatory celibacy, (c) the refusal to ordain women as priests, (d) homophobia or (e) all of the above. Given the media's track record we shouldn't really be surprised. When ratings are your true god, the real one doesn't stand a chance at fair and balanced coverage. It doesn't even bother me that "Saturday Night Live" in a recent episode did its occasional "we're more sophisticated than you are" attack on the church by portraying Jesus wielding an assault weapon.
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