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NEWS
February 23, 1990
Now, Poland, there's a union town . . . er, country. So what's the Marriott Corp., that avowedly non-union hotel chain, doing opening the country's first Western-managed hotel? Just paying the workers at the Warsaw Marriott better-than-average wages while feeding them two meals a day - not to mention bringing in desperately needed foreign currency for the Polish government. The company's boost to the local economy also extends to the contracts it has signed with Polish farmers, fishermen and a brewery to ensure a steady stream of local provisions.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In an effort to calm Polish fears of a powerful, reunified Germany, President Bush yesterday told Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki that "Poland must have a voice" in any international decisions "affecting the fate of Poland. " Bush's statement - the broadest commitment the United States has made to a major Polish role in determining the shape of a new Europe - was made in a White House ceremony welcoming Poland's first non-communist prime minister since World War II. Talks later between Bush and Mazowiecki focused on Poland's fears that a reunified Germany might try to claim territory ceded to Poland by Germany after World War II. Moreover, Poland wants a greater role than it has been granted in international discussions about German reunification.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Poland is finding that introducing democracy and capitalism is easier said than done, according to Polish diplomat Zbigniew Kudas, who described Poland as a nation where events are changing faster than attitudes. Although change in Poland has become irreversible, Poles must now become accustomed to the complexities of elections and free enterprise, said Kudas, who addressed a crowd of 100 people at Camden County College last Wednesday. "You also have a transition of minds," said Kudas, first secretary of the Polish Embassy in Washington.
NEWS
December 23, 1986
I came back three weeks ago after two years in Poland and was greeted as a returning war veteran. I wondered why until I read a Dec. 14 front-page headline. "A struggle for survival grips Poles" may catch the reader's attention, but it does not capture the atmosphere in Warsaw. In a sense it is equally apt for Philadelphia. I imagine there are mothers here who also cannot afford to buy winter shoes for their children. Sure, Poles have less than Americans. Acquiring simple things like toilet paper is an art and important things like an apartment for some seem next to impossible, but life is not "a struggle for simple existence.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Poland yesterday called the terms of a U.S. offer of emergency milk "arrogant and abusive," and countered with a pledge of 5,000 blankets and sleeping bags for New York's "many thousands of homeless who sleep in the streets. " The U.S. government has offered to send Poland 50,000 tons of powdered milk to replace milk that might have been contaminated because of the Soviet nuclear accident. But yesterday, Jerzy Urban, a spokesman for the Polish government, assailed a May 6 U.S. Senate resolution urging that the milk be distributed through Polish church and charitable groups, rather than by the Communist government, to make sure it was given out without political considerations.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1990 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade of struggle for freedom and democracy will bear fruit in Poland this year. Poland is getting cable television. Yes, it's cable television for a nation in which less than a quarter of the households have telephones but 98 percent have television sets, according to the joint venture that will build the nationwide cable system. Cable television for a country where the only two broadcast channels - both government-owned - each operates about 12 hours a day. And, true to the capitalist system their nation is adopting, Poles will pay a lot for the new service, perhaps as much as $22 a month in a country where the average monthly income per person is less than $200.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | Associated Press
WARSAW, Poland - The daughters of a Yiddish writer persecuted under communism reclaimed copies of his works Tuesday after a prolonged legal fight with a Polish archive. The letters, newspaper articles, and poems by Naftali Herts Kon, whose real name was Jakub Serf, were deposited with the Warsaw Archives by communist authorities after he was sentenced to prison on fabricated charges in 1963. After 15 months in confinement, Kon left for Israel, where he died in 1971. On Tuesday, his daughters received the papers - in 15 folders.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Solidarity trade union movement, suppressed for years with its leaders sometimes imprisoned, now governs Poland after the abdication of the ruling Communist Party yesterday - a voluntary passage of power unthinkable only months ago. Tadeusz Mazowiecki, 62, the editor of Solidarity's weekly magazine and who was interned for a year during martial law in 1980-81, was asked formally last night to fashion a new government by President Wojciech Jaruzelski,...
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush this summer will make the first visit to Hungary by a U.S. president and will stop in Poland to show American approval of reforms in Eastern Europe, the White House said yesterday. White House officials said Bush would visit the two countries, which are at the cutting edge of change in Eastern Europe, in mid-July before heading to Paris to attend the annual economic summit of Western industrial powers. Bush might add Yugoslavia to his itinerary, the White House said.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Renee Wright began the spring semester at Bodine High School for International Affairs by teaching Eastern European geography to her 10th-grade class, and discussing how the new openness will affect the former Soviet bloc countries. On Sunday, the former student-teacher will start to find out about Eastern Europe firsthand as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English in Poland. And she'll be making history, as well, as one of the first 120 Peace Corps volunteers dispatched anywhere in Europe.
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NEWS
June 13, 2016
Jack Bausman, 92, a Cold War-era correspondent and former Moscow bureau chief for the Associated Press, died Thursday at a hospital in Stamford, Conn., his daughter, Mary-Fred Bausman-Watkins, said. He had heart surgery in April and never fully recovered, she said. Mr. Bausman arrived in Moscow as the news agency's bureau chief in July 1968, about a month before the Soviet Union invaded Czechoslovakia. He also reported from Frankfurt, Germany, from Warsaw, Poland, and from Budapest, Hungary, during a four-decade career with the AP, including his four years in Moscow.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
When Rosalie Chris Lerman returned to Auschwitz-Birkenau in 2006 with family, everyone filed into a long, brick barracks and paused at a particular wooden shelf by a window. That's where, Mrs. Lerman said, she slept with eight other girls when she was just 16, where she saw a chimney belch the blackest, most acrid smoke every day. Mrs. Lerman learned something from that window, her daughter said, and it saved her spirit. "Looking at that window, at the chimney, she somehow summoned up hope.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Holocaust survivor David Tuck will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Yom HaShoah Observance at York's Jewish Community Center. At age 9, Tuck spent was taken to the Lodz ghetto in Poland in 1940. He spent the next five years circulating from a labor camp in Posen in Poland to Auschwitz in Germany. He eventually landed in Güsen II, an underground factory to build German aircraft for the war. He weighed only 78 pounds at th end of the war, Tuck was liberated from Güsen II on May 5, 1945.
NEWS
May 3, 2016
Boy killed, 8 injured in Roxborough crash A young boy was killed and eight other people - including a baby girl - were injured in a Sunday afternoon vehicle crash in Roxborough. Police said the boy, about 6 years old, was pronounced dead shortly after the two-vehicle accident at Henry Avenue and Hermit Lane. Authorities declined to identify the boy. The baby and a man were critically injured in the 4 p.m. accident, but police said their condition was stable. They said the others were less seriously injured.
NEWS
April 15, 2016 | By Bernard Fernandez, CORRESPONDENT
ON SATURDAY night, two-time former IBF cruiserweight champion Steve "USS" Cunningham gets to come home again. In a way, he's actually doing it twice. At the relatively advanced age of 39, Cunningham (28-7-1, 13 KOs), the former bosun's mate from Southwest Philadelphia, challenges 10-years-younger WBO cruiserweight titlist (25-0, 16 KOs) Krzysztof Glowacki, of Poland, at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. It is one of three bouts to be televised via Premier Boxing Champions on NBC. The others are Marcus Browne (17-0, 13 KOs)
BUSINESS
March 12, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
QVC, the West Chester-based multimedia shopping company, is expanding overseas and cutting jobs - at the same time. The company founded in 1986 in the Philly suburbs now gets nearly a third of its revenue from outside the United States. At the same time, changing habits, and a younger shopper adept at mobile devices, have forced the company to focus more online and on many more digital platforms. Last year, $3.5 billion of QVC's $8.8 billion in net revenue came from e-commerce, half of which was from mobile platforms alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Chopin Without Piano? Who would dare separate the 19th-century Polish composer from the instrument most associated with him, and why write a one-woman play that does just that? Though Frédéric Chopin left Poland at 20 never to return, Poles revere him; playing with his image is, for them, musical and cultural heresy. But that is the intent of Polish director Michal Zadara and his wife, actor and codirector Barbara Wysocka, who are the Warsaw theater company Centrala. In Chopin Without Piano , which had its North American premiere at Swarthmore College's Lang Concert Hall on Saturday night, they inserted Wysocka as a surrogate for the piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When Peter Ryba, 89, opened the letter from a young stranger in the United States, the Australian businessman couldn't believe what he was reading. Are you related to Gregory Ryba, a young Jewish boy who perished during the Holocaust? the letter asked? Ryba was born in Berlin in 1926 to Polish parents. "We had a good life," he recalled. "We lived in an apartment and were financially doing OK - I had a governess and there was a maid. " In 1931, Ryba's little brother, Gregory, was born.
TRAVEL
January 5, 2015 | By the Rev. John Shimchick, For The Inquirer
I knew about the three sisters from the letters. In 1912 my grandfather, George, left his village of Siderka (then Russia) about an hour north of Bialystok, and never returned. Throughout his life, his brothers Vladimir and Makary sent him letters. Last year my Uncle Walter gave me a box of their letters and we worked on getting them translated. I am a priest, serving the Orthodox Church of the Holy Cross in Medford, and this effort coincided with a trip our Diocesan Bishop Michael was planning to Poland for August 2014.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK LUTZ didn't know how to quit. After serving as an educator all over the world - Philadelphia, Montgomery County, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Poland - he was teaching cartooning at an adult learning center. In fact, he was preparing a lesson plan for the course when he died June 29 at age 92. He lived in Mount Laurel, N.J. "He would exhaust you and me and five other people," said his son, Barry Lutz. "He didn't sleep. " After 30 years in Africa, and pushing 70, Jack decided to join the Peace Corps and taught college in Poland for several more years.
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