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Police Abuse

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NEWS
April 5, 2000 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
In a case that pushes the concept of police abuse to its limits, the city's Police Advisory Commission has concluded that a police lieutenant in the Internal Affairs division engaged in misconduct when he allegedly pulled back his sport coat to reveal a gun. The incident occurred in July 1997, when Lt. Michael Weaver, who was later promoted to captain, attempted to serve notice of a required IAD interview with Nathaniel Harley, a police officer...
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Philadelphia, police call it a "nickel ride. " In Chicago, police call it a "joyride. " In Baltimore, investigators are exploring whether Freddie Gray may have been fatally injured - his spine nearly severed - when he was subjected to what police there call a "rough ride. " Whatever the name, the practice of throwing prisoners into the back of police wagons, unbelted, and then subjecting them to high-speed stops and starts is an aptly named form of street justice that has been secretly administered for many years in many cities.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fewer citizens reported that they had been physically abused by police in 1986 than in any year since 1982, when the Police Department began keeping detailed records of such complaints, according to the records. At the same time, the total number of citizen complaints against police for any reason was the lowest in the last eight years. The number of fatal shootings by police last year - four - was the lowest since 1982. In addition, Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker fired more officers last year - 39 - than any commissioner in the last six years.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Andrea Smith, 33, mother of three, answered the front door when a police officer came knocking at her house in the Buckingham Park section of Willingboro late one night last winter. She told him the woman he was looking for was not there. He left. Forty-five minutes later, he returned. This time he was with a superior who, Smith said, barged into her home and shoved her against a kitchen wall, injuring her before taking her to police headquarters and handcuffing her to a radiator for three hours - only then realizing that the officers had arrested the wrong person.
NEWS
August 16, 2006
Cops flashing their badges for sex makes a mockery of the police motto, "to protect and serve. " Faced with sordid revelations of officers in Philadelphia and other cities extorting sex and assaulting women, police departments across the nation are failing to rid their ranks of these attackers. A two-part Inquirer series this week (http://go.philly.com/predators) reveals how much more police commanders have to do. They need to improve screening, training and on-the-job oversight of officers to prevent such abuses.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By NEIL WEINER
The Rodney King riots, Los Angeles 1992, fit the pattern. Such riots are sparked by police incidents or their aftermath. Then usually comes an investigating commission. The commission reports on causes, which are of three types. Root causes: health, education, family structure. Surface causes: housing, unemployment, discrimination, and especially police practices. Immediate cause: a police incident. Then later, the next riot. NEW YORK, 1935: In Harlem, police arrested a 16-year-old black for a minor theft.
NEWS
May 20, 1993
Perhaps no other institution of civic life has more visceral a connection with citizens than the police. Philadelphia's 6,182 officers represent a thin blue line between order and chaos for most citizens, whose fear of crime is on the rise. But there's an ambivalence to this connection between police and citizens. While we respect and applaud their courage and commitment, it must also be recognized that police officers sometimes behave in an unprofessional and offensive manner.
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Stories of police abuse and official inaction punctuated City Council's second hearing on bills to create a Police Advisory Board yesterday. One incident occurred less than a year ago, and for David Rudovsky, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, it's just another reason why the city needs such a board. She was 22 with no prior record and a job with the Catholic school system. Her problem was that she kicked a car fender, which happened to belong to an off-duty cop. He arrested her and took her to the district station.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
How big is the 39th District police scandal? Big enough that at least two Philadelphia lawyers are advertising for potential clients who may have been victims of misconduct by the district's rogue cops. Both say they are merely trying to serve the public, but critics - including honest cops - say lawyers who advertise for police abuse cases are nothing more than ambulance chasers. So far, six police officers in the 39th District have pleaded guilty to federal charges of stealing money from drug suspects and falsifying police records in a widening scandal that has rocked the Police Department.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Black religious and political leaders gathered in West Philadelphia yesterday to condemn what they called a pervasive pattern of police abuse against minorities. They presented no statistics or outside analysis to support their claim, but they called on black-owned businesses to close on Thursday and join a 10 a.m. protest march on City Hall. And they asked for African American lawyers to represent people who say they were mistreated by the police and the courts. "The system is not working," said the Rev. Jerome Cooper, chairman of the Delaware Valley Ecumenical Council.
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NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Aubrey Whelan, and Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Hundreds of demonstrators surged through Center City on Thursday evening to angrily denounce police violence, at one point surrounding a squad car, and later grappling in a tense push-and-shove that saw officers ready their batons. Despite the tumult, noise, and moments of high tension - including a rush to reach and take over the Vine Street Expressway - nothing was broken and no one was seriously hurt. Police said they made three or four arrests; two of those arrested were released several hours later, to the cheers of some in the crowd.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Philadelphia, police call it a "nickel ride. " In Chicago, police call it a "joyride. " In Baltimore, investigators are exploring whether Freddie Gray may have been fatally injured - his spine nearly severed - when he was subjected to what police there call a "rough ride. " Whatever the name, the practice of throwing prisoners into the back of police wagons, unbelted, and then subjecting them to high-speed stops and starts is an aptly named form of street justice that has been secretly administered for many years in many cities.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a quiet victory on a rainy Saturday, the results announced not to a cheering crowd but to a dozen people huddled under a sidewalk awning in North Philadelphia. Rodney Muhammad had been elected the new president of the Philadelphia NAACP, a victory that in past years might have guaranteed public adulation but that now promises mostly hard work. Muhammad, 62, takes over the leadership of a venerable organization torn by internal dissent, assuming local command amid national protest over the police killings of unarmed black men in New York City and Ferguson, Mo. "He's got a big job," said A. Bruce Crawley, a public relations executive who has known Muhammad for more than 20 years.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer for a Camden man who was paralyzed during an encounter with police called Friday for authorities to release more video of the incident, repeating claims of police brutality and cover-up made in a suit. The Camden County Police Department has denied the claims, and a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said Friday that it stood by statements made in June, after an initial review, that surveillance video did not show excessive force or police misconduct. Xavier Ingram, 21, was paralyzed after he fell while running from officers across Seventh Street near Chestnut Street around 10 p.m. June 12, police said.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Chris Hepp and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
With the 2015 primary still eight months away, Ken Trujillo launched his bid for mayor at a sprinter's pace Wednesday with positions big and small on education, policing, and business development. A former city solicitor under Mayor John F. Street, Trujillo in short order declared he would: Press to end state control of city schools. Establish universal prekindergarten education. Cut the illiteracy rate in half. End racial profiling and stop-and-frisk tactics by police.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker, who took the reins of a troubled Police Department at a low ebb in the 1980s and initiated reforms that still resonate today, died Tuesday after a 22-year battle against a brain tumor. He was two days shy of his 72d birthday. Mr. Tucker grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., and came to Philadelphia in the 1970s to head the regional field office of the U.S. Secret Service. He had retired from the Secret Service after a 20-year career - including a stint protecting Jacqueline Kennedy and her two children in the 1960s - when Philadelphia Mayor W. Wilson Goode asked Tucker in 1986 to take the toughest job in the city - commissioner of the Police Department, which was reeling from the 1985 MOVE debacle and a corruption scandal that had reached the highest ranks.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
IN A CITY that has seen a surge in homicides in the first months of the year, the news that Mayor Nutter has budgeted for 125 new police officers is certainly good news. (The hirings are mainly to replace the large number of police who have left through the Deferred Retirement Option Plan.) This increase in the force could have an impact not just on the crime rate, though, but on the need for the city to improve the oversight and accountability of the police, especially when it comes to citizen complaints.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
    IN A FEBRUARY 1983 Daily News column, Chuck Stone pondered why suspects chose to surrender to him. "I'm not sure," the legendary columnist and senior editor wrote. "Perhaps, trust. Maybe an operative subliminal negritude, since 80 percent of all police abuse is white cop-black victim. Possibly, an expectation of abuse deterrence. " They may have needed a dictionary to read his column, but over the years 72 criminal suspects, many wanted in shootings and murders, surrendered to Stone - at times even showing up at his home, according to a 1987 column.
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