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Police Abuse

NEWS
September 27, 2006 | By Craig R. McCoy and Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Lawyers for a former stripper sexually assaulted by two Philadelphia police officers have marshaled new evidence that the department missed chances to rein in the officers, meeting complaints about their misbehavior with indifference. In one instance, the mother of a 15-year-old girl complained to police that Officers Timothy Carre and James Fallon had stopped and leered at her daughter and tried to lure her into their patrol car. But, she said, a "rude and arrogant" officer who answered her call cut her off, demanding, " 'What's your point?
NEWS
August 16, 2006
Cops flashing their badges for sex makes a mockery of the police motto, "to protect and serve. " Faced with sordid revelations of officers in Philadelphia and other cities extorting sex and assaulting women, police departments across the nation are failing to rid their ranks of these attackers. A two-part Inquirer series this week (http://go.philly.com/predators) reveals how much more police commanders have to do. They need to improve screening, training and on-the-job oversight of officers to prevent such abuses.
NEWS
December 13, 2005 | By Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Worried about possible leaks to the media, the commander of the Philadelphia Police Department's Internal Affairs Division secretly installed a hidden video camera in her office. Inspector William Colarulo, a police spokesman, said yesterday that Deputy Commissioner Charlotte Council "didn't suspect anyone in particular" when she ordered the camera installed in her third-floor office at Police Headquarters at Eighth and Race Streets. Colarulo said Council, whose office is across the hall from Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson's suite, did not tell Johnson about the device.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Earl Ofari Hutchinson
This piece originally appeared in early editions of Sunday's Inquirer. We reprint it here so that it can reach a wider audience. The defining moment for me in the O.J. Simpson trial was not Simpson's acquittal and the firestorm it ignited nationally. It was a note I got from an associate in Johnnie Cochran's law firm. He said that Johnnie wanted me to know he admired my comments in the case. I was one of the legion of talking-head analysts during the trial, and like many of the other analysts, I was skeptical, even critical, of some of Cochran's legal maneuvers.
NEWS
April 3, 2005 | By Earl Ofari Hutchinson
The defining moment for me in the O.J. Simpson trial was not Simpson's acquittal and the firestorm it ignited nationally. It was a note I got from an associate in Johnnie Cochran's law firm. He said that Johnnie wanted me to know he admired my comments in the case. I was one of the legion of talking-head analysts during the trial, and like many of the other analysts, I was skeptical, even critical, of some of Cochran's legal maneuvers. I thought he badly overplayed the race card in the case, and deliberately played to the anti-police sentiments of some of the black jurors.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After deliberating less than 15 minutes, a federal jury decided yesterday that a Camden councilman's lawsuit against the city, the Police Department, and three officers accused of insulting and roughing him up had no cause. Councilman Ali Sloan El said he was not disappointed by the decision because he intended his case to bring attention to what he called a problem of police abuse. "I wanted to open up the Pandora's box of police abuse [that exists] throughout the city of Camden," he said.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Protesters from the Republican National Convention are accusing police and prison guards of 295 instances of mistreatment and abuse - everything from hair pulling to choking to psychological harassment. In Inquirer interviews with nearly two dozen activists alleging some of the more serious claims, two cases yielded corroborating medical evidence and a few others appeared credible and disturbing. But many of the more serious allegations were found to have no supporting evidence beyond eyewitness accounts.
NEWS
August 16, 2000
Thomas Jones may be a criminal, but so was police behavior Thomas Jones was apparently involved in very serious criminal activity before and during the altercation with police. I do not justify his behavior or absolve him of responsibility. It has since been determined that Jones did not shoot a police officer, but even if an officer had been shot by Jones, that would not be justification for the abuse he suffered. The mayor, district attorney and Police Department seem determined to rationalize the abusive behavior of the officers who beat and kicked Jones.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
Editor's note: Of about 150 letters, faxes and e-mail on the arrest of Thomas Jones, more than 2-1 show support for the Philadelphia police. That support ranges from condoning the way Jones was subdued, to waiting for all the facts, to seeing brutality in this case but recognizing the difficulty of the situation and police work in general. Today, the second wave of response: reactions to the reactions. Tomorrow, responses to Arlene Notoro Morgan's column on how the media have handled the arrest.
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