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Police Abuse

NEWS
April 3, 2005 | By Earl Ofari Hutchinson
The defining moment for me in the O.J. Simpson trial was not Simpson's acquittal and the firestorm it ignited nationally. It was a note I got from an associate in Johnnie Cochran's law firm. He said that Johnnie wanted me to know he admired my comments in the case. I was one of the legion of talking-head analysts during the trial, and like many of the other analysts, I was skeptical, even critical, of some of Cochran's legal maneuvers. I thought he badly overplayed the race card in the case, and deliberately played to the anti-police sentiments of some of the black jurors.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After deliberating less than 15 minutes, a federal jury decided yesterday that a Camden councilman's lawsuit against the city, the Police Department, and three officers accused of insulting and roughing him up had no cause. Councilman Ali Sloan El said he was not disappointed by the decision because he intended his case to bring attention to what he called a problem of police abuse. "I wanted to open up the Pandora's box of police abuse [that exists] throughout the city of Camden," he said.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Protesters from the Republican National Convention are accusing police and prison guards of 295 instances of mistreatment and abuse - everything from hair pulling to choking to psychological harassment. In Inquirer interviews with nearly two dozen activists alleging some of the more serious claims, two cases yielded corroborating medical evidence and a few others appeared credible and disturbing. But many of the more serious allegations were found to have no supporting evidence beyond eyewitness accounts.
NEWS
August 16, 2000
Thomas Jones may be a criminal, but so was police behavior Thomas Jones was apparently involved in very serious criminal activity before and during the altercation with police. I do not justify his behavior or absolve him of responsibility. It has since been determined that Jones did not shoot a police officer, but even if an officer had been shot by Jones, that would not be justification for the abuse he suffered. The mayor, district attorney and Police Department seem determined to rationalize the abusive behavior of the officers who beat and kicked Jones.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
Editor's note: Of about 150 letters, faxes and e-mail on the arrest of Thomas Jones, more than 2-1 show support for the Philadelphia police. That support ranges from condoning the way Jones was subdued, to waiting for all the facts, to seeing brutality in this case but recognizing the difficulty of the situation and police work in general. Today, the second wave of response: reactions to the reactions. Tomorrow, responses to Arlene Notoro Morgan's column on how the media have handled the arrest.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The Black Clergy of Philadelphia and Vicinity, meeting daily with city leaders and each other to deal with alleged abuse by Philadelphia police in a violent arrest last week, find themselves with a new crisis. They'll meet again today to plot a response to yesterday's killing of an unarmed man by an Amtrak police officer. They've already scheduled an interfaith, interracial rally for Sunday to protest abuse. It's been a busy week for a group that's politically potent and never bashful about handling hot potatoes.
NEWS
April 5, 2000 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
In a case that pushes the concept of police abuse to its limits, the city's Police Advisory Commission has concluded that a police lieutenant in the Internal Affairs division engaged in misconduct when he allegedly pulled back his sport coat to reveal a gun. The incident occurred in July 1997, when Lt. Michael Weaver, who was later promoted to captain, attempted to serve notice of a required IAD interview with Nathaniel Harley, a police officer...
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying they did not violate anyone's constitutional rights, Darby Borough officials and police officers asked a federal court yesterday to dismiss a lawsuit that accuses them of a 15-year pattern of police abuse, official cover-ups and other civil rights transgressions. "There are actually very few factual allegations made," William F. Holsten, a lawyer for the borough and its police force, stated in court papers filed yesterday in U.S. District Court. The motion for dismissal was in response to a 77-page complaint filed last month that cited 127 cases of alleged misconduct by Darby police against scores of people between February 1984 and July 1999.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tameika Brown, a counselor from Delaware County Women Against Rape, was collecting her thoughts on the way to Trainer to conduct a police training session. Sometimes police are hard to reach, she said: "There's this perception that we're this radical feminist group who's going to come in and tell them what to do. " But Brown wasn't worried. Sitting across the table from her in a restaurant, in a purple shirt, dark slacks and a brown mustache, was her secret weapon: Officer Tom Byrne.
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