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Police Academy

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NEWS
March 13, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
When Hugh Wilson made the first Police Academy in 1984, the basic comic idea was that the city had abandoned all physical and psychological standards for entrance to its law-enforcement academy. The movie's sequels have proved that much the same policy is in force in the nation's movie theaters. Police Academy films have become one of the wrongs of spring. Now as the weather turns warmer, dread springs eternal. The Phillies come north with another team guaranteed to have grown men cringing by early May, and Warner Bros.
NEWS
April 6, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
When Bubba Smith played football for Michigan State, the fans used to urge the giant defensive lineman to "Kill, Bubba, kill!" Bubba often nearly obliged, but it is too much to hope that he might turn on the makers of the Police Academy series with the same homicidal flair he once brought to the pursuit of enemy quarterbacks. For one thing, the astounding success of this witless series assures Smith and the other graduates a very good living. A Police Academy movie has now become one of the wrongs of spring.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
You can have being worked over with a nightstick or 10 hours of third- degree interrogation. For sheer police brutality, nothing comes close to sitting through Police Academy 5. In fact, it's so dreadful that I would recommend seeing it only with an attorney present. Except that no one - not even a lawyer - should be subjected to such cruel and unusual punishment. Anyone who has made it past 11 - in years or IQ - will know that you don't go to a Police Academy movie unprepared.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Cynics may scoff, but there really is one brief and shining moment in Police Academy 3: Back in Training. It comes at the opening of the film, when the numbskull governor of California suffers an attack of taste and says it's time to close down the academy. But before grown-ups have a chance to rise as one and cheer to the rafters, this is revealed to be another Hollywood lie on the order of "Steven (Spielberg) read your script, and he loves it. " The Police Academy series tries to get more out of old garbage than the nearest recycling plant.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cameras were clicking, the videotapes were rolling, and the audience was on its feet, applauding, as 61 men and 29 women filed into the Philadelphia Civic Center yesterday to become members of the city's Police Department. The VIPs - including Mayor Goode and Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams - saluted the courage and determination of the new officers. Besides the speeches, there was rousing music from the Pasttimers, a police band. It was a day to celebrate - for all concerned.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
David Wurzburg of Hainesport said his father had been trying for years to get him to cut his shoulder-length hair. "I had never had short hair before, and I was always afraid to get it cut, sir!" said the 18-year-old, who now sports a high-and-tight buzz cut. For the last week, Wurzburg, a heavy cigarette smoker, has been waking up each morning at 5:30, performing strenuous calisthenics and running 1.5 miles each day. He's also started addressing people he doesn't know as "Sir.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
The Camden County Prosecutor's Office and Camden County College have created a partnership to keep the county's police academy functioning, officials said Monday. Earl Coxson, who ran the academy as an employee of the Prosecutor's Office, was laid off this year, possibly jeopardizing the operations of the academy. Under the agreement, effective July 1, the college will assume Coxson's annual salary of about $60,000, according to the Camden County Board of Freeholders. The Prosecutor's Office will continue to assign an investigator and a clerical employee to staff the academy, which will not accept new recruits until January.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Officer Gerald Gallagher was like a proud parent. For the past five months he had helped guide 72 men and women through the rigors of Police Academy training. Yesterday, as they lined up to receive their diplomas, Gallagher reached out to shake their hands, slap their backs, and wish them "godspeed. " When it was Officer Franklin Steed's turn to thank Gallagher, he ignored his outstretched hand, threw his arms around the veteran cop, and hugged him instead. "He was like a father to me," said Steed, 30. If making it through the academy was a strain, it did not show on the faces of the 49 men and 23 women who graduated yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol," a comedy starring Steve Guttenberg, Bubba Smith, G.W. Bailey, Bobcat Goldthwait and George Gaynes. Directed by Jim Drake. Screenplay by Gene Quintano. Running time: 87 minutes. A Warner Brothers release. "Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol" has jokes about bodily (and birds') functions, a pompous guy whose pants rip and who gets a bullhorn Krazy-glued to his face, some excellent skateboarding, rock music, a joke about Mace deodorant, a guy (Michael Winslow)
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This week, the school board placed a 17-year-old male student on a year's homebound instruction for his role in a shooting incident at the high school. The student, investigators said, fired a series of shots from a .38-caliber pistol into the air, apparently to impress his friends. For some, that incident just last month was the latest example of why some sort of police presence is needed in Willingboro schools. And so audience members applauded Monday night when the school board, in a 6-3 vote, approved setting up a version of campus police at the district's secondary schools.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Ben Finley and Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Wolf on Monday nominated a retired state police major who grew up in North Philadelphia and lives in Chester County to be Pennsylvania's next police commissioner. Tyree C. Blocker, whose assignments included director of the state police's bureau of drug law enforcement, is Wolf's second choice for the job, following his controversial and politically costly nomination of Marcus Brown. Brown, a former head of the Maryland State Police, withdrew his name from consideration in mid-June after Wolf failed to get enough support among Republican lawmakers in Harrisburg.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
KELVIN NANCE thought he'd be the ideal Philadelphia police officer. After all, his parents are officers in the department. He has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Kutztown University, whereas the department merely requires applicants to have 60 college-credit hours. And although applicants must pass a basic physical-fitness test, Nance is fit enough to have won this year's Pennsylvania Golden Gloves boxing tournament in the 165-pound novice class division. But Nance, 25, was rejected for entrance into the Police Academy in September after completing the yearlong application process.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
DAVID FISHER was startled late last year when he ran into a class of Police Academy recruits. Of the 35 young people, he said, just one was African-American and the rest were white. In May, Fisher, a 29-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, had a similar experience when he happened upon another academy class. He recalled seeing 16 whites, three blacks and one Latina. The lack of racial diversity troubled Fisher, president of the National Black Police Association Greater Philadelphia, an advocacy organization for black officers.
NEWS
March 31, 2015
LET'S CONSIDER the complex case of one Marcus Brown. It involves apparel, yard signs, social media, politics and race. It's a stunning example of narrow-minded self interest vs. sane public policy. In January, Brown was nominated by Gov. Wolf to head the Pennsylvania State Police after heading the Maryland State Police. A principal reason he was picked, according to Wolf at the time, was his "recruiting in areas with high minority populations and historically black colleges.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf said Friday that he stands by his embattled nominee to lead the Pennsylvania State Police. The Democratic governor's comments came as acting Commissioner Marcus Brown has become mired in another controversy after he was caught on video this week taking down roadside signs near his home that were critical of him. Wolf, who was in Philadelphia on Friday, told reporters that Brown did the right thing by apologizing for...
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf's nominee to head the Pennsylvania State Police has stepped into yet another controversy. Acting State Police Chief Marcus Brown was captured on video removing signs that criticized him from the side of a public roadway. Brown has faced scrutiny in recent weeks for choosing to wear the Pennsylvania State Police uniform despite not having attended the state's Police Academy. The two signs were critical of that decision, reading, "Marcus Brown didn't earn it!"
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT'S THE LITTLE things that Constance Wilson remembers the most about her grandson, Robert. "That big smile" that he always had on his face; the way he would light up the room whenever he paid her one of his frequent visits; the hugs he would shower her with. "He was one of the best grandsons you could have," she said last week inside her living room in Angora, a tiny, close-knit neighborhood near the Delaware County border. "He was someone who wanted to do right, and that's what he did. " This morning, Wilson will say goodbye to her grandson.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY BARBARA LAKER & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
SUZIE, A WHITE-and-gray pit bull, was asleep upstairs beside a young boy when police officers barreled into their East Germantown home, searching for a wanted felon. Petrified of the bright lights and guns, Suzie sprinted off the bed and started down the hallway. That's when a cop fired his gun at her with four children nearby. Downstairs, the parents screamed in horror. No one, including Suzie, was hit, but the bullet tore through the floorboards and into the kitchen ceiling.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County police departments in the inner-ring suburbs are working to improve relationships with their communities, and they are starting with the kids. Eleven Delaware County departments are joining forces to hold three different Youth Police Academies, where participants will learn what it takes to become a cop, from basic physical requirements to how to investigate a crime scene. "Police departments need to get into their community and make sure they are not disconnected," said Robert Smythe, police chief of Darby Borough.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Of all the new Wolf administration nominees awaiting confirmation, few face a challenge quite like acting State Police Commissioner Marcus Brown. The veteran officer, who until recently headed the Maryland State Police, is not facing scrutiny just from legislators. He's also fielding it from within his own ranks. A Facebook page has been created where retired troopers and others have excoriated Brown over his decision to don the gray uniform troopers wear - even though, despite a long career in policing, he did not attend the State Police Academy.
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