CollectionsPolice Academy
IN THE NEWS

Police Academy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
When Hugh Wilson made the first Police Academy in 1984, the basic comic idea was that the city had abandoned all physical and psychological standards for entrance to its law-enforcement academy. The movie's sequels have proved that much the same policy is in force in the nation's movie theaters. Police Academy films have become one of the wrongs of spring. Now as the weather turns warmer, dread springs eternal. The Phillies come north with another team guaranteed to have grown men cringing by early May, and Warner Bros.
NEWS
April 6, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
When Bubba Smith played football for Michigan State, the fans used to urge the giant defensive lineman to "Kill, Bubba, kill!" Bubba often nearly obliged, but it is too much to hope that he might turn on the makers of the Police Academy series with the same homicidal flair he once brought to the pursuit of enemy quarterbacks. For one thing, the astounding success of this witless series assures Smith and the other graduates a very good living. A Police Academy movie has now become one of the wrongs of spring.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
You can have being worked over with a nightstick or 10 hours of third- degree interrogation. For sheer police brutality, nothing comes close to sitting through Police Academy 5. In fact, it's so dreadful that I would recommend seeing it only with an attorney present. Except that no one - not even a lawyer - should be subjected to such cruel and unusual punishment. Anyone who has made it past 11 - in years or IQ - will know that you don't go to a Police Academy movie unprepared.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Cynics may scoff, but there really is one brief and shining moment in Police Academy 3: Back in Training. It comes at the opening of the film, when the numbskull governor of California suffers an attack of taste and says it's time to close down the academy. But before grown-ups have a chance to rise as one and cheer to the rafters, this is revealed to be another Hollywood lie on the order of "Steven (Spielberg) read your script, and he loves it. " The Police Academy series tries to get more out of old garbage than the nearest recycling plant.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cameras were clicking, the videotapes were rolling, and the audience was on its feet, applauding, as 61 men and 29 women filed into the Philadelphia Civic Center yesterday to become members of the city's Police Department. The VIPs - including Mayor Goode and Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams - saluted the courage and determination of the new officers. Besides the speeches, there was rousing music from the Pasttimers, a police band. It was a day to celebrate - for all concerned.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
David Wurzburg of Hainesport said his father had been trying for years to get him to cut his shoulder-length hair. "I had never had short hair before, and I was always afraid to get it cut, sir!" said the 18-year-old, who now sports a high-and-tight buzz cut. For the last week, Wurzburg, a heavy cigarette smoker, has been waking up each morning at 5:30, performing strenuous calisthenics and running 1.5 miles each day. He's also started addressing people he doesn't know as "Sir.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
The Camden County Prosecutor's Office and Camden County College have created a partnership to keep the county's police academy functioning, officials said Monday. Earl Coxson, who ran the academy as an employee of the Prosecutor's Office, was laid off this year, possibly jeopardizing the operations of the academy. Under the agreement, effective July 1, the college will assume Coxson's annual salary of about $60,000, according to the Camden County Board of Freeholders. The Prosecutor's Office will continue to assign an investigator and a clerical employee to staff the academy, which will not accept new recruits until January.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Officer Gerald Gallagher was like a proud parent. For the past five months he had helped guide 72 men and women through the rigors of Police Academy training. Yesterday, as they lined up to receive their diplomas, Gallagher reached out to shake their hands, slap their backs, and wish them "godspeed. " When it was Officer Franklin Steed's turn to thank Gallagher, he ignored his outstretched hand, threw his arms around the veteran cop, and hugged him instead. "He was like a father to me," said Steed, 30. If making it through the academy was a strain, it did not show on the faces of the 49 men and 23 women who graduated yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol," a comedy starring Steve Guttenberg, Bubba Smith, G.W. Bailey, Bobcat Goldthwait and George Gaynes. Directed by Jim Drake. Screenplay by Gene Quintano. Running time: 87 minutes. A Warner Brothers release. "Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol" has jokes about bodily (and birds') functions, a pompous guy whose pants rip and who gets a bullhorn Krazy-glued to his face, some excellent skateboarding, rock music, a joke about Mace deodorant, a guy (Michael Winslow)
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This week, the school board placed a 17-year-old male student on a year's homebound instruction for his role in a shooting incident at the high school. The student, investigators said, fired a series of shots from a .38-caliber pistol into the air, apparently to impress his friends. For some, that incident just last month was the latest example of why some sort of police presence is needed in Willingboro schools. And so audience members applauded Monday night when the school board, in a 6-3 vote, approved setting up a version of campus police at the district's secondary schools.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
One week after an alarming report about Chester's finances was presented to the public, Mayor Thaddeus Kirkland and his top finance official said Monday that the town would not be laying off members of the Police or Fire Departments - for now, at least. Kirkland's assurances, made during an interview at Chester City Hall on Monday, came after a team of state-appointed consultants called for "extreme measures" to close the city's $16.3 million deficit. Among its most controversial recommendations, the report, prepared by Philadelphia economic consulting firm Econsult Solutions, called for reducing police and fire staffs, including closing one of the city's two fire stations.
NEWS
August 1, 2016
Liz Dow is CEO of Leadership Philadelphia It's a late afternoon on a warm spring day. I stand watching passersby on a crowded downtown street. As I take in the normal ebb and flow of activity, in my left peripheral vision I notice a man slowly opening a door in a curious crouching position. He continues to crouch as he emerges, with one hand behind him. I yell, "Stop!" He keeps moving. I yell it again, much louder, but still he does not. My adrenaline surges as his arm moves.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA POLICE Recruit harder for educated candidates Former Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey was headed in a positive direction when he required more-educated, less-violence-prone Philadelphia officers. Now, because a 60-college-credit (or two years in the military) requirement poses a recruitment challenge, new Commissioner Richard Ross sadly wants to ditch it ("Police recruiting woes may end college credit requirement," Tuesday). What's needed is more-aggressive recruiting, including of recruits of color, not backsliding on standards that are important to the public's interests.
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Patrolling the streets of her hometown has benefits for CaBria Davis. Sometimes the 31-year-old police officer runs into childhood friends who are living or working in Camden. She is often struck by the changes that have come to the city's neighborhoods. Occasionally, in moments that always catch her off guard, she crosses paths with someone who knew her father. "I never knew him - only from pictures," said Davis, who was 9 when her father was murdered. "So it's nice, sometimes, to hear someone tell me they remember him. " Davis, who grew up in South Camden with her mother and younger brother, became a member of the Camden County Metro police force a little more than two years ago. Her mother no longer lives in the city, and with no departmental residency requirement in place, Davis doesn't have to live in Camden.
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Fifteen new graduates of the Philadelphia Police Academy were sworn in as officers on Friday, the smallest graduating class in recent memory, officials said. Although enrollment in the academy has been declining for years, Police Commissioner Richard Ross and police spokesman Lt. John Stanford each said he could not remember a class with fewer members. In years past, graduating classes regularly topped 100 members. Stanford said police departments across the country have been experiencing challenges in recruiting in recent years.
NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Kenney said Wednesay that he will seek funding for 800 police body cameras and the equipment needed to manage the cameras. In a radio interview Wednesday morning, Kenney spilled the beans on some budget initiatives he plans to announce during his budget address to Council on Thursday. The 800 cameras and equipment will be paid for through the city budget and some grant money. A total budget amount was not immediately available. "This is an important step forward in Philadelphia's police-community relations," Kenney said.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth R. Rocks Sr., 65, an Army paratrooper and Philadelphia city patrolman who rose to become a vice president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, died Saturday, Nov. 21, of lung cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center. A longtime Philadelphian, he had retired to Lewes, Del., in 2010. "The world lost a great man yesterday," a niece, Claire Rocks, wrote on Facebook. "Protect and serve: It was not just a job, it was a way of being. This wasn't just for his family but also for the rest of the country, as he served in the Vietnam War, and as a Philadelphia police officer and FOP leader.
SPORTS
September 14, 2015 | BY JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
ONE OF MANNY Folly's earliest recollections of Kip Street in North Philly, where he grew up, is peering out of his house with the weathered, brown door at a teenager he knew who had just been shot lying in the middle of the street. Seconds later, a car ran over the kid. At the end of the street is a church, and on the steps of that church sit the drug dealers during the day - just as they did back then. Returning recently to Kip Street, Folly's eyes narrow like a hovering hawk as he glares down the small stretch of pocked asphalt devoid of hope - where, in a good year, only two or three homicides occur.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Ben Finley and Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Wolf on Monday nominated a retired state police major who grew up in North Philadelphia and lives in Chester County to be Pennsylvania's next police commissioner. Tyree C. Blocker, whose assignments included director of the state police's bureau of drug law enforcement, is Wolf's second choice for the job, following his controversial and politically costly nomination of Marcus Brown. Brown, a former head of the Maryland State Police, withdrew his name from consideration in mid-June after Wolf failed to get enough support among Republican lawmakers in Harrisburg.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
KELVIN NANCE thought he'd be the ideal Philadelphia police officer. After all, his parents are officers in the department. He has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Kutztown University, whereas the department merely requires applicants to have 60 college-credit hours. And although applicants must pass a basic physical-fitness test, Nance is fit enough to have won this year's Pennsylvania Golden Gloves boxing tournament in the 165-pound novice class division. But Nance, 25, was rejected for entrance into the Police Academy in September after completing the yearlong application process.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|