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Police Brutality

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NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A coalition of 30 civic, religious and political groups this week sounded a public alarm about police brutality, an issue that has not been in the forefront of public debate since department reforms six years ago. The coalition charged there is a "widespread perception in many of our communities . . . that routine abuse and harassment of citizens by the police has been increasing and becoming more violent in recent years. " The standard measure of police abuse - the number of complaints filed by citizens with the department - would appear to contradict the coalition's contention.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By ST. JOHN BARNED-SMITH, sbarned-smith@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Considering the size of the crowd that filled South Street Saturday night, police say that things didn't turn out all that bad. But four teenagers charged with assaulting police officers are alleging that they were victims of excessive force. Police said that five officers were injured and 19 revelers were arrested Saturday after thousands of young people swarmed South Street. Cops had bulked up patrols on the street after "flash mobs" appeared on at least two weekends earlier this year.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker yesterday rejected a call for an independent investigatory panel with Hispanic community membership to look into allegations that police officers used unnecessary force while arresting three North Philadelphia residents - two of them pregnant women - on Feb. 12. Tucker said that he hoped the normal 45-day Internal Affairs Division investigation could be accelerated and end in 30 days. "I left the meeting with mixed feelings," said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman for the local chapter of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | by Julie Amparano Lopez and Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writers
AIDS activists lambasted the police commissioner yesterday for appointing a panel to review a department probe of allegations that police brutalized protesters in Center City last week, claiming that its job is merely to cover up the truth. But a member of the panel said that based on TV news footage he's seen, it appears that police used excessive force in quelling a protest by ACT UP, a militant AIDS group. "It looked like a police riot," said Larry Gross, one of the panelists.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Anthony McCartney, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - His beating stunned the nation, left Los Angeles smoldering and helped reshape race relations and police tactics. And in a quavering voice on national television, Rodney King pleaded for peace while the city burned. But peace never quite came for King - not after the fires died down, after two of the officers who broke his skull multiple times were punished, after Los Angeles and its flawed police department moved forward. His life, which ended Sunday at age 47 after he was pulled from the bottom of his swimming pool, was a continual struggle even as the city he helped change moved on. The images - preserved on an infamous grainy video - of the black driver curled up on the ground while four white officers clubbed him - became a national symbol of police brutality in 1991.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city yesterday agreed to pay $325,000 to a brain-damaged North Philadelphia youth to settle a hotly-contested case alleging police brutality. "It certainly doesn't admit any wrongdoing. Frankly, we don't believe there was any," said City Solicitor Stephanie Franklin-Suber. The settlement between the city and Kareem Glass, 18, ended a jury trial that had been in progress before U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno. The city's top lawyer said she agreed to settle the case to avoid a risk of the jury awarding much more to Glass, who had been seeking several million dollars in damages, according to court records.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | BY CAL THOMAS
The outrage was immediate and the response of government was swift to the widely viewed videotape of the police mini-riot by white Los Angeles Police Department officers against a black suspect they had stopped after a high- speed chase. The amateur photographer's pictures of Rodney King writhing on the ground while being clubbed with police batons and shocked with a stun gun were powerful symbols that the LA district attorney, federal officials and opinion writers, liberal and conservative, could not ignore.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | By MARK KRIEGEL and DON GENTILE, New York Daily News
The Rev. Al Sharpton and 15 others were arrested yesterday when they attempted to cross the East River Drive during a march protesting local injustices to blacks. The arrests came about 5:20 p.m. as Sharpton, along with lawyers Alton Maddox Jr. and C. Vernon Mason, led about 500 people on a march from Harlem to a rally outside Gracie Mansion, the mayor's residence. After his arrest, Sharpton vowed to "agitate every week until we get (Mayor Edward) Koch out. " Sharpton announced he would take Tawana Brawley to Washington today to meet with Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
Nearly three weeks ago in New York City, 30-year-old Haitian immigrant Abner Louima was ensnared in a confrontation with police that even Los Angeles' Rodney King could never have imagined. Two officers at Brooklyn's 70th Police Precinct were accused of the physical and sexual abuse of Louima, a married security guard with no prior arrests, after a skirmish outside a nightclub. He was allegedly beaten by police on the way to the precinct. He was taken to the men's room, he said, where 25-year-old officer Justin Volpe allegedly used the handle of a toilet plunger to sodomize him, then jammed the stick into his mouth, breaking a few of Louima's teeth.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer for a Camden man who was paralyzed during an encounter with police called Friday for authorities to release more video of the incident, repeating claims of police brutality and cover-up made in a suit. The Camden County Police Department has denied the claims, and a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said Friday that it stood by statements made in June, after an initial review, that surveillance video did not show excessive force or police misconduct. Xavier Ingram, 21, was paralyzed after he fell while running from officers across Seventh Street near Chestnut Street around 10 p.m. June 12, police said.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
As darkness fell in Center City on Wednesday, about 20 young people in pale white masks and dark clothing milled around quietly as police gathered nearby. The group was made up of members of the worldwide "hacktivist" group Anonymous. They had assembled at Eighth and Market Streets before marching to City Hall to protest corruption and other societal ills. "Our goal is to hopefully instate a government that works by the people, for the people," said one protester who, like almost all his companions, wore a Guy Fawkes mask and declined to state his name.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even before 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. - before Eric Garner died after New York City police officers put him in a choke hold - civil rights advocates were calling for police officers to wear cameras that record their interactions with the public. It's a policy, they say, that would protect people against police brutality and exonerate officers wrongfully accused of misconduct. It's a policy already in place in at least three major departments, and in the aftermath of Brown's and Garner's high-profile cases, calls for the cameras are gaining momentum.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
TULLYTOWN She made national headlines last year, alleging police brutality after officers used a Taser on her handcuffed son, 14, who fled from police and fell. The image of his bloodied face went viral. Now, Marissa Sargeant is said to have shoplifted from the same Bucks County Walmart where her son was arrested for shoplifting and subsequently injured. Sargeant and a relative allegedly took $100 worth of unnamed items from the store in Tullytown on Thursday and were arrested after a Walmart employee called police.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Created by the playwright/director/theorist Peter Brook, with his longtime collaborator Marie-Helene Estienne, The Suit is a touching musical play about life in South Africa under the tyranny of apartheid. Now at the Prince Music Theater, the show has been on tour, first in London, then New York, and is on its way to Washington. It stars the beautiful Nonhlanhla Kheswa as a young wife who longs for "more" in her life. Her husband (Ivanno Jeremiah) learns she has been cheating on him, and when he comes home unexpectedly one morning, he scares off her lover, who leaves behind his suit.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY DIANA DAVID, Daily News Staff Writer davidd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
THE RAIN, ice and lingering snow yesterday did not stop Ulana Mazurkevich. "We are here to show solidarity," Mazurkevich said. With about 20 cohorts, Mazurkevich - president of the Ukrainian Human Rights Committee, a Philly-area group - held a candlelight vigil on Independence Mall in support of rebels in Kiev who have been defying the Ukrainian government. They held signs: "Sanctions; No Going Back to the Gulag!" and "President Obama - Do Not Let Putin Dictate U.S. Foreign Policy.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WHEN THE district attorney and the police commissioner held a news conference last week about the Philly teen who says he was abused by cops, I figured that was that. Police would say they investigated as best they could, given the lack of cooperation, but found no evidence of wrongdoing. Blah, blah. Case closed. Instead, Commissioner Charles Ramsey and D.A. Seth Williams announced a joint investigation into 16-year-old Darrin Manning's allegations of police brutality. Well, I'll be . . . "We don't normally confirm ongoing investigations, but given the nature of this case, we felt it was important to let the public know that we have been vigorously investigating this case since it occurred," Williams said.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CLARENCE FARMER SR. had a knack for survival. How many political appointees could keep their job through four very different mayors? He did it by being a likable guy who had no enemies, and being exceptionally good at what his position as chairman of the Commission on Human Relations called for: the ability to bring peace to warring segments of city society. He even met with leaders of the back-to-nature cult MOVE at a time when any self-respecting political leader would tiptoe around the controversial band of countercultural rebels.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 2008 election of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States symbolized for some Americans an end to the 500-year history of subjugation that has defined the African American experience. It was the last river that African Americans had to cross before achieving true historical liberty. "Yes . . . and no," said Harvard University literary critic and scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr., the writer, executive producer, and narrator of African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross . The magisterial, six-hour documentary traces the history of African Americans since the first slaves landed in the Americas in the 16th century.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
CATALYST FOR CHANGE ministries occupies a towering old church on the corner of 38th and Baring streets. Last Friday night, it was filled with more than 100 people gathered for a two-hour discussion about the alleged police brutality against 16-year-old Darrin Manning. The conversation was spirited and sometimes angry. But it was mostly measured and sometimes surprisingly hopeful. Too bad no one from the city or the Police Department was there to hear it - unless they came undercover and chose not to tell organizers they were there.
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