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Police Brutality

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NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A coalition of 30 civic, religious and political groups this week sounded a public alarm about police brutality, an issue that has not been in the forefront of public debate since department reforms six years ago. The coalition charged there is a "widespread perception in many of our communities . . . that routine abuse and harassment of citizens by the police has been increasing and becoming more violent in recent years. " The standard measure of police abuse - the number of complaints filed by citizens with the department - would appear to contradict the coalition's contention.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By ST. JOHN BARNED-SMITH, sbarned-smith@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Considering the size of the crowd that filled South Street Saturday night, police say that things didn't turn out all that bad. But four teenagers charged with assaulting police officers are alleging that they were victims of excessive force. Police said that five officers were injured and 19 revelers were arrested Saturday after thousands of young people swarmed South Street. Cops had bulked up patrols on the street after "flash mobs" appeared on at least two weekends earlier this year.
NEWS
October 17, 2015
ISSUE | CRIME AND RACE Stop the violence and police brutality Less-than-thoughtful conversations about crime and policing that lack a racial-justice lens only serve to perpetuate stereotypes of black criminality and enable acts of police criminality ("Race, crime, and police: A closer look," Sunday). When opponents of justice reform and the Black Lives Matter movement raise the specter of "black-on-black" crime, they hope to end discussions of police brutality. They would justify heavy-handed policing and deadly use of force against unarmed black people by claiming that their race is a criminal element.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
BALTIMORE. Ferguson. Detroit. Watts. Harlem. Philadelphia. The through line for the protests sparked in these and other cities, in a history that spans well over 50 years, is not civil rights, or racial tensions. It's police brutality. Questionable arrests, mistreatment or killing of blacks in the past year by police officers in Ferguson, New York and Baltimore were the same sparks that launched the seminal protests of 50 years ago in Detroit, Watts and other places, which fed the larger civil-rights movement.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker yesterday rejected a call for an independent investigatory panel with Hispanic community membership to look into allegations that police officers used unnecessary force while arresting three North Philadelphia residents - two of them pregnant women - on Feb. 12. Tucker said that he hoped the normal 45-day Internal Affairs Division investigation could be accelerated and end in 30 days. "I left the meeting with mixed feelings," said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman for the local chapter of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Jessica Parks and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Staring into the clear, cold sky Sunday night, Danielle Duncan joined a group of about 30 who lay silent on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, surrounded by hundreds of fellow demonstrators. "I'm kind of flustered," Duncan, 21, said after standing up, her voice catching with emotion. "I feel like we're just not seeing equally. I don't feel like it's the fault of anyone, but we have to adjust to it. " Duncan was one of almost 1,000 people who marched from LOVE Park to the museum in yet another protest over what they perceive to be police brutality and racial tension across the country.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | by Julie Amparano Lopez and Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writers
AIDS activists lambasted the police commissioner yesterday for appointing a panel to review a department probe of allegations that police brutalized protesters in Center City last week, claiming that its job is merely to cover up the truth. But a member of the panel said that based on TV news footage he's seen, it appears that police used excessive force in quelling a protest by ACT UP, a militant AIDS group. "It looked like a police riot," said Larry Gross, one of the panelists.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Anthony McCartney, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - His beating stunned the nation, left Los Angeles smoldering and helped reshape race relations and police tactics. And in a quavering voice on national television, Rodney King pleaded for peace while the city burned. But peace never quite came for King - not after the fires died down, after two of the officers who broke his skull multiple times were punished, after Los Angeles and its flawed police department moved forward. His life, which ended Sunday at age 47 after he was pulled from the bottom of his swimming pool, was a continual struggle even as the city he helped change moved on. The images - preserved on an infamous grainy video - of the black driver curled up on the ground while four white officers clubbed him - became a national symbol of police brutality in 1991.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
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NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
The shooting of a police officer the night before did not deter protesters from marching through North Philadelphia on Friday in a demonstration against police brutality and economic inequities in the African American community. Dozens of police on foot, on bicycles, and in squad cars followed scores of predominantly college-age marchers on their peaceful, two-mile walk from Broad Street and Erie Avenue to Temple University. The demonstration, planned several weeks earlier, took place as the nation's attention was focused on the shooting of a Philadelphia police officer by a man who detectives said had pledged allegiance to the Islamic State.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Days before the Martin Luther King holiday, and against a national backdrop of fatal police shootings of young black men, some of the nation's most prominent African American activists are coming to Philadelphia to call for change. "It's an incredible, incredible moment," said the Rev. Mark Tyler of Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church in Society Hill. "The needs of the black community have been put on the back burner for far too long. " The organizers, known as the Black Radical Organizing Collective, issued a "Call to Action" that decried society's "return to the most rabid forms of racism," and a government that represses immigrants and Muslims while unleashing "a reign of racist police terror against people of color.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Two months ago, Philadelphia's new mayor asked Philadelphia's new police commissioner where he would like to take the oath of office. "I'm not that conventional," Jim Kenney told Richard Ross. They could skip a staid ceremony at City Hall, he said. Instead, Kenney asked, "Is there a place that's important to you?" And so, on Tuesday afternoon, dozens of police officers and politicians and preachers piled into the seats in Central High School's auditorium. The school's entire graduating class filled in the seats behind them and gave a son of Central a standing ovation when he was sworn in as the city's 30th police commissioner.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robin Williams had DLB In her first interview in more than a year, Robin Williams ' widow says the comic's August 2014 suicide wasn't caused by depression, but by Diffuse Lewy Body Dementia, or DLB. "Depression was one of let's call it 50 symptoms and it was a small one," Susan Williams tells People. DLB is the second-most common form of neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer's and is often misdiagnosed. Susan Williams said her husband began exhibiting symptoms a year before his death, including anxiety, delusions, and impaired movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even if you've been only a sporadic follower of the Black Lives Matter movement, you've probably read one of DeRay Mckesson's tweets. The 30-year-old Minneapolis school administrator-turned protester is cofounder of We the Protesters and Campaign Zero, which work to improve community-police relations. He's become one of the faces at the movement's forefront. After the shooting of Michael Brown in August 2014, Mckesson drove to Ferguson, Mo., and began tweeting updates. Soon he was doing it in New York for Eric Garner; Baltimore for Freddie Gray; McKinney, Texas, where black teens were harassed by police at a party; and other cities.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
PHILADELPHIA police union leaders jumped on the boycott bandwagon of filmmaker Quentin Tarantino, a few days after the New York and Los Angeles police unions announced a similar boycott, because Tarantino attended a rally against police brutality last weekend. "Mr. Tarantino has made a good living through his films, projecting into society at large violence and respect for criminals; he, it turns out, also hates cops," read a statement from Philly's Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, which represents about 6,500 officers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Once upon a time, you could take the measure of a Philadelphian by his or her reaction to the name Frank Rizzo . As Bruce Graham's Theatre Exile world-premiere play Rizzo makes abundantly clear, you were with him or against him. He was a skull-cracking peacekeeper and the only politician brave enough to stand up for the working class, or he was a skull-cracking, gay-bashing, racist bully and the leader of a ring of cronies and thugs who held...
NEWS
October 17, 2015
ISSUE | CRIME AND RACE Stop the violence and police brutality Less-than-thoughtful conversations about crime and policing that lack a racial-justice lens only serve to perpetuate stereotypes of black criminality and enable acts of police criminality ("Race, crime, and police: A closer look," Sunday). When opponents of justice reform and the Black Lives Matter movement raise the specter of "black-on-black" crime, they hope to end discussions of police brutality. They would justify heavy-handed policing and deadly use of force against unarmed black people by claiming that their race is a criminal element.
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey addressed the controversial topics of criminal justice reform and police brutality at a barber shop recently, and a brief video of his comments has been shared hundreds of times on Facebook. Ramsey took questions from visitors to Hewitts Barbershop in the West Oak Lane neighborhood as he sat in the barber's seat getting a haircut Wednesday . "Yeah, I got bad cops, no doubt about that," Ramsey said after noting that African Americans killed by police represent a minuscule fraction of African American homicide victims.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2015 | By Gary Thompson, DAILY NEWS MOVIE CRITIC
On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Black Panther Party, founded in 1966, comes a new documentary to recount the movement's lively history. While children of the '60s and '70s may find much that is familiar in Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution , most will also find something to discover in the film, assembled by veteran PBS documentarian Stanley Nelson. He uses vintage photos and music to place the movie in time, and finds insiders and eyewitnesses to explain the unique excitement created by the Panther "brand" - from the outset, so much more ferocious than the mainstream Civil Rights movement.
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