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Police Brutality

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NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A coalition of 30 civic, religious and political groups this week sounded a public alarm about police brutality, an issue that has not been in the forefront of public debate since department reforms six years ago. The coalition charged there is a "widespread perception in many of our communities . . . that routine abuse and harassment of citizens by the police has been increasing and becoming more violent in recent years. " The standard measure of police abuse - the number of complaints filed by citizens with the department - would appear to contradict the coalition's contention.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By ST. JOHN BARNED-SMITH, sbarned-smith@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Considering the size of the crowd that filled South Street Saturday night, police say that things didn't turn out all that bad. But four teenagers charged with assaulting police officers are alleging that they were victims of excessive force. Police said that five officers were injured and 19 revelers were arrested Saturday after thousands of young people swarmed South Street. Cops had bulked up patrols on the street after "flash mobs" appeared on at least two weekends earlier this year.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Jessica Parks and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Staring into the clear, cold sky Sunday night, Danielle Duncan joined a group of about 30 who lay silent on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, surrounded by hundreds of fellow demonstrators. "I'm kind of flustered," Duncan, 21, said after standing up, her voice catching with emotion. "I feel like we're just not seeing equally. I don't feel like it's the fault of anyone, but we have to adjust to it. " Duncan was one of almost 1,000 people who marched from LOVE Park to the museum in yet another protest over what they perceive to be police brutality and racial tension across the country.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker yesterday rejected a call for an independent investigatory panel with Hispanic community membership to look into allegations that police officers used unnecessary force while arresting three North Philadelphia residents - two of them pregnant women - on Feb. 12. Tucker said that he hoped the normal 45-day Internal Affairs Division investigation could be accelerated and end in 30 days. "I left the meeting with mixed feelings," said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman for the local chapter of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | by Julie Amparano Lopez and Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writers
AIDS activists lambasted the police commissioner yesterday for appointing a panel to review a department probe of allegations that police brutalized protesters in Center City last week, claiming that its job is merely to cover up the truth. But a member of the panel said that based on TV news footage he's seen, it appears that police used excessive force in quelling a protest by ACT UP, a militant AIDS group. "It looked like a police riot," said Larry Gross, one of the panelists.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Anthony McCartney, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - His beating stunned the nation, left Los Angeles smoldering and helped reshape race relations and police tactics. And in a quavering voice on national television, Rodney King pleaded for peace while the city burned. But peace never quite came for King - not after the fires died down, after two of the officers who broke his skull multiple times were punished, after Los Angeles and its flawed police department moved forward. His life, which ended Sunday at age 47 after he was pulled from the bottom of his swimming pool, was a continual struggle even as the city he helped change moved on. The images - preserved on an infamous grainy video - of the black driver curled up on the ground while four white officers clubbed him - became a national symbol of police brutality in 1991.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city yesterday agreed to pay $325,000 to a brain-damaged North Philadelphia youth to settle a hotly-contested case alleging police brutality. "It certainly doesn't admit any wrongdoing. Frankly, we don't believe there was any," said City Solicitor Stephanie Franklin-Suber. The settlement between the city and Kareem Glass, 18, ended a jury trial that had been in progress before U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno. The city's top lawyer said she agreed to settle the case to avoid a risk of the jury awarding much more to Glass, who had been seeking several million dollars in damages, according to court records.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | BY CAL THOMAS
The outrage was immediate and the response of government was swift to the widely viewed videotape of the police mini-riot by white Los Angeles Police Department officers against a black suspect they had stopped after a high- speed chase. The amateur photographer's pictures of Rodney King writhing on the ground while being clubbed with police batons and shocked with a stun gun were powerful symbols that the LA district attorney, federal officials and opinion writers, liberal and conservative, could not ignore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2015
PHILLY-BASED actor Christopher Mann has landed what could be the role of a lifetime - portraying legendary civil-rights activist Cecil B. Moore in Tigre Hill's upcoming film, "American Zealot. " A movie about Moore's life would be timely, given all the buzz around the new movie "Selma" and nationwide protests about police brutality following the untimely deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. "I know he'd have a problem with the way things are," Mann, 50, said of Moore - a Philadelphia lawyer and politician who headed up the local NAACP and led the fight to integrate Girard College.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two hundred people turned out for a "Pro-Blue Rally" Saturday on Independence Mall, shivering in the cold and cheering as speakers urged the public to appreciate the dangerous work that police do every day. Protesters at recent rallies against perceived police brutality in New York and Ferguson, Mo., "don't speak for America," Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) told the crowd. Noting that 115 police officers died in the line of duty in the United States in 2014 - and that 10 have already been shot this year - Toomey called it a "great day to be standing up for our law enforcement officers" who "protect us day in and day out. " With a theme that "All Lives Matter," the rally was in response to numerous recent demonstrations around the country protesting the deaths of unarmed black men by white police officers.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Invoking the life and legacy of Muslim activist leader Malcolm X and others, scores of demonstrators are expected at noon Saturday to join a rally organized by the Muslims Mobilized Against Police Brutality. The march, set to begin at LOVE Park, is the latest in weeks of demonstrations sparked by the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, unarmed black men, at the hands of police. Kameelah Rashad, the lead organizer of the event, said the event has particular importance because black Muslims, who have a tradition of activism, can face injustice on multiple fronts.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Jessica Parks and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Staring into the clear, cold sky Sunday night, Danielle Duncan joined a group of about 30 who lay silent on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, surrounded by hundreds of fellow demonstrators. "I'm kind of flustered," Duncan, 21, said after standing up, her voice catching with emotion. "I feel like we're just not seeing equally. I don't feel like it's the fault of anyone, but we have to adjust to it. " Duncan was one of almost 1,000 people who marched from LOVE Park to the museum in yet another protest over what they perceive to be police brutality and racial tension across the country.
NEWS
December 23, 2014
IF YOU SAY something loudly enough, with just the right amount of conviction, the odds are that people will begin to listen. They might not agree with you, but they'll listen, and then move on. Sometimes, though, there will be people who listen too closely and then, out of a skewed sense of reality or priorities, or simply as a convenient excuse for their own twisted motives, turn your passion and conviction into a criminal act. You will say...
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anger and anguish over police killings in Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y., continue to bubble up across the region, with city school students, teachers, and the teachers' union president speaking out Friday. At three Philadelphia schools, students staged a "die-in" as a statement against police brutality and racism. At midmorning, 100 students at Masterman High School assembled in a first-floor hallway during their lunch period. They sat or lay down silently, some holding "Black Lives Matter" signs, others closing their eyes or staring straight ahead.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
One veteran Philadelphia civil rights lawyer found the evidence exonerating Officer Darren Wilson murky. There were no accounts of Michael Brown's appearing to reach for a gun, no flash of something silver, the lawyer said. Another defense lawyer said he was both bemused and surprised to see all the attention paid by the grand jury to exculpatory evidence. "Did that happen because it was [about] a police officer?" the lawyer asked. "I think the answer is probably yes. " But a former prosecutor who won convictions against Philadelphia police for brutality was won over.
NEWS
November 24, 2014
IN 2012, Philadelphia Police Lt. Jonathan Josey became a national symbol of police brutality after a cellphone video went viral of him hitting a woman in the aftermath of the Puerto Rican Day Parade. He was charged with simple assault and fired - only to be exonerated the following year. Josey, at the time a decorated, 19-year-veteran of the police force, also got his job back - complete with back pay. Fast-forward to 2014 and Josey is not only a vindicated man but a wiser one. The incident, which made national headlines, helped him reorder his priorities about what's really important, a message he shares in his new play, "What If Heaven Was Black.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer for a Camden man who was paralyzed during an encounter with police called Friday for authorities to release more video of the incident, repeating claims of police brutality and cover-up made in a suit. The Camden County Police Department has denied the claims, and a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said Friday that it stood by statements made in June, after an initial review, that surveillance video did not show excessive force or police misconduct. Xavier Ingram, 21, was paralyzed after he fell while running from officers across Seventh Street near Chestnut Street around 10 p.m. June 12, police said.
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