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Police Brutality

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NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A coalition of 30 civic, religious and political groups this week sounded a public alarm about police brutality, an issue that has not been in the forefront of public debate since department reforms six years ago. The coalition charged there is a "widespread perception in many of our communities . . . that routine abuse and harassment of citizens by the police has been increasing and becoming more violent in recent years. " The standard measure of police abuse - the number of complaints filed by citizens with the department - would appear to contradict the coalition's contention.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By ST. JOHN BARNED-SMITH, sbarned-smith@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Considering the size of the crowd that filled South Street Saturday night, police say that things didn't turn out all that bad. But four teenagers charged with assaulting police officers are alleging that they were victims of excessive force. Police said that five officers were injured and 19 revelers were arrested Saturday after thousands of young people swarmed South Street. Cops had bulked up patrols on the street after "flash mobs" appeared on at least two weekends earlier this year.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker yesterday rejected a call for an independent investigatory panel with Hispanic community membership to look into allegations that police officers used unnecessary force while arresting three North Philadelphia residents - two of them pregnant women - on Feb. 12. Tucker said that he hoped the normal 45-day Internal Affairs Division investigation could be accelerated and end in 30 days. "I left the meeting with mixed feelings," said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman for the local chapter of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
BALTIMORE. Ferguson. Detroit. Watts. Harlem. Philadelphia. The through line for the protests sparked in these and other cities, in a history that spans well over 50 years, is not civil rights, or racial tensions. It's police brutality. Questionable arrests, mistreatment or killing of blacks in the past year by police officers in Ferguson, New York and Baltimore were the same sparks that launched the seminal protests of 50 years ago in Detroit, Watts and other places, which fed the larger civil-rights movement.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Jessica Parks and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Staring into the clear, cold sky Sunday night, Danielle Duncan joined a group of about 30 who lay silent on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, surrounded by hundreds of fellow demonstrators. "I'm kind of flustered," Duncan, 21, said after standing up, her voice catching with emotion. "I feel like we're just not seeing equally. I don't feel like it's the fault of anyone, but we have to adjust to it. " Duncan was one of almost 1,000 people who marched from LOVE Park to the museum in yet another protest over what they perceive to be police brutality and racial tension across the country.
NEWS
October 17, 2015
ISSUE | CRIME AND RACE Stop the violence and police brutality Less-than-thoughtful conversations about crime and policing that lack a racial-justice lens only serve to perpetuate stereotypes of black criminality and enable acts of police criminality ("Race, crime, and police: A closer look," Sunday). When opponents of justice reform and the Black Lives Matter movement raise the specter of "black-on-black" crime, they hope to end discussions of police brutality. They would justify heavy-handed policing and deadly use of force against unarmed black people by claiming that their race is a criminal element.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | by Julie Amparano Lopez and Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writers
AIDS activists lambasted the police commissioner yesterday for appointing a panel to review a department probe of allegations that police brutalized protesters in Center City last week, claiming that its job is merely to cover up the truth. But a member of the panel said that based on TV news footage he's seen, it appears that police used excessive force in quelling a protest by ACT UP, a militant AIDS group. "It looked like a police riot," said Larry Gross, one of the panelists.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Anthony McCartney, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - His beating stunned the nation, left Los Angeles smoldering and helped reshape race relations and police tactics. And in a quavering voice on national television, Rodney King pleaded for peace while the city burned. But peace never quite came for King - not after the fires died down, after two of the officers who broke his skull multiple times were punished, after Los Angeles and its flawed police department moved forward. His life, which ended Sunday at age 47 after he was pulled from the bottom of his swimming pool, was a continual struggle even as the city he helped change moved on. The images - preserved on an infamous grainy video - of the black driver curled up on the ground while four white officers clubbed him - became a national symbol of police brutality in 1991.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
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NEWS
June 7, 2016
YOUR RECENT editorial, " Charter Schools Office rightly exercising its power ," (May 23) demands a response in the interests of fairness. ASPIRA acknowledges the legitimate concerns of the School Reform Commission and the Charter Schools Office in taking all necessary steps to ensure renewed confidence in ASPIRA's business model and practices going forward. But these concerns have no bearing on ASPIRA's success in educating our community's students. Ours is a record of outstanding achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin and Stephan Salisbury, STAFF WRITERS
It has been a little more than four years since the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., and the resulting bubbling-over of U.S. racial and political tensions for all the world to see. "It was the shot heard around the world," playwright Thomas Soto says. At the time, he and Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj - who was recently appointed guest artistic director for the 49th season of New Freedom Theatre in Philadelphia - were in New York. "We were trying to find ways to [channel]
NEWS
May 3, 2016
I'M WHITE; college educated, grew up in NE Philly, started and sold two businesses, and I'm a Republican. My mother left El Salvador with a seventh-grade education and made sure we learned how to fit in and work hard. My brother graduated from West Point. I've worked all my life since the age of 10. I read Solomon Jones' article - "White liberals can't abandon the issues that impact blacks" - and felt both sad and angry. I rarely read the Daily News. So Republicans are responsible for police brutality in urban environments?
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Solomon Jones
THE LEVEL of animosity that has developed around this presidential election is troubling, but it is not unexpected. We should have known there would be backlash after the election in 2008 of the first black president. We should have foreseen Republican efforts to benefit from racist resentment of Barack Obama. But I don't think we could have predicted the anger on the left; a resentment born of the idealistic belief that America's conservatism could be reversed in less than a decade.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
In a land that's known as freedom how can such a thing be fair Won't you please come to Chicago for the help that we can bring We can change the world Rearrange the world It's dying. - Graham Nash, "Chicago" OF COURSE, it was Chicago. It had to be. And I'm not even talking about the tumultuous events that Graham Nash is referencing in 1971 hit, "Chicago" - the police riot at the 1968 Democratic Convention, the 1969 "Days of Rage," or the trail of the Chicago 8 (then 7)
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Norristown's Theatre Horizon on Thursday opens Lobby Hero , Kenneth Lonergan's 2001 drama. Director Matthew Decker and cast will be unspooling a provocative comedy of errors embracing hot-button topics (racial profiling, police brutality, gender politics). Lonergan, 53, is the bluntly lyrical author of the Oscar-nominated scripts for 2002's Gangs of New York and 2000's You Can Count on Me (the latter of which he directed), as well the critically acclaimed 1996 Off-Broadway hit This Is Our Youth . In January, Lonergan's newest cinematic effort, Manchester by the Sea , which he wrote and directed, screened at the Sundance Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2016
Beyoncé's naughty politics Have a wardrobe malfunction at the Super Bowl and you'll live to see another day. But woe unto the artist who comes onto the field with a political message. Woe to Beyoncé , whose Super Bowl 50 performance apparently was saturated with a pro-black power and anti-cop political subtext that has angered many a football fan and quite a few politicos, including former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani . Giuliani told Fox & Friends on Monday that Bey's performance of her new song "Formation," which was released Saturday, was anti-police.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
WITH ALL the bluster and grandstanding of the GOP presidential nominees, Tattle was almost beginning to miss the common-sense pragmatism of former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani . And then he opened his mouth. Until Giuliani, all we had heard about Beyonce 's Super Bowl halftime performance was how great it was - she "won" the Super Bowl, she "slayed," she empowered, she was truly Queen B. Not to Rudy. "This is football, not Hollywood," Rudy told Fox News about how he was troubled by Beyonce's show (and clearly clueless about the NFL)
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
The shooting of a police officer the night before did not deter protesters from marching through North Philadelphia on Friday in a demonstration against police brutality and economic inequities in the African American community. Dozens of police on foot, on bicycles, and in squad cars followed scores of predominantly college-age marchers on their peaceful, two-mile walk from Broad Street and Erie Avenue to Temple University. The demonstration, planned several weeks earlier, took place as the nation's attention was focused on the shooting of a Philadelphia police officer by a man who detectives said had pledged allegiance to the Islamic State.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Days before the Martin Luther King holiday, and against a national backdrop of fatal police shootings of young black men, some of the nation's most prominent African American activists are coming to Philadelphia to call for change. "It's an incredible, incredible moment," said the Rev. Mark Tyler of Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church in Society Hill. "The needs of the black community have been put on the back burner for far too long. " The organizers, known as the Black Radical Organizing Collective, issued a "Call to Action" that decried society's "return to the most rabid forms of racism," and a government that represses immigrants and Muslims while unleashing "a reign of racist police terror against people of color.
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