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Police Brutality

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NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A coalition of 30 civic, religious and political groups this week sounded a public alarm about police brutality, an issue that has not been in the forefront of public debate since department reforms six years ago. The coalition charged there is a "widespread perception in many of our communities . . . that routine abuse and harassment of citizens by the police has been increasing and becoming more violent in recent years. " The standard measure of police abuse - the number of complaints filed by citizens with the department - would appear to contradict the coalition's contention.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
It was the start of the 2016 ESPY Awards and there were four superstars onstage - LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade and Chris Paul - standing extra tall as they spoke out against police brutality and called on their fellow athletes to do the same. It was a powerful moment. All those multi-millionaire athletes. Each his own mega-brand. Standing up for something besides just getting richer and winning NBA championships. My favorite part was when James, dressed in a classic black tuxedo, gazed into a camera and said, "It's time to look in the mirror and ask ourselves, 'what are we doing to bring about change?
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By ST. JOHN BARNED-SMITH, sbarned-smith@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Considering the size of the crowd that filled South Street Saturday night, police say that things didn't turn out all that bad. But four teenagers charged with assaulting police officers are alleging that they were victims of excessive force. Police said that five officers were injured and 19 revelers were arrested Saturday after thousands of young people swarmed South Street. Cops had bulked up patrols on the street after "flash mobs" appeared on at least two weekends earlier this year.
NEWS
October 17, 2015
ISSUE | CRIME AND RACE Stop the violence and police brutality Less-than-thoughtful conversations about crime and policing that lack a racial-justice lens only serve to perpetuate stereotypes of black criminality and enable acts of police criminality ("Race, crime, and police: A closer look," Sunday). When opponents of justice reform and the Black Lives Matter movement raise the specter of "black-on-black" crime, they hope to end discussions of police brutality. They would justify heavy-handed policing and deadly use of force against unarmed black people by claiming that their race is a criminal element.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Jessica Parks and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Staring into the clear, cold sky Sunday night, Danielle Duncan joined a group of about 30 who lay silent on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, surrounded by hundreds of fellow demonstrators. "I'm kind of flustered," Duncan, 21, said after standing up, her voice catching with emotion. "I feel like we're just not seeing equally. I don't feel like it's the fault of anyone, but we have to adjust to it. " Duncan was one of almost 1,000 people who marched from LOVE Park to the museum in yet another protest over what they perceive to be police brutality and racial tension across the country.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker yesterday rejected a call for an independent investigatory panel with Hispanic community membership to look into allegations that police officers used unnecessary force while arresting three North Philadelphia residents - two of them pregnant women - on Feb. 12. Tucker said that he hoped the normal 45-day Internal Affairs Division investigation could be accelerated and end in 30 days. "I left the meeting with mixed feelings," said David Sambolin, an attorney and spokesman for the local chapter of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | by Julie Amparano Lopez and Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writers
AIDS activists lambasted the police commissioner yesterday for appointing a panel to review a department probe of allegations that police brutalized protesters in Center City last week, claiming that its job is merely to cover up the truth. But a member of the panel said that based on TV news footage he's seen, it appears that police used excessive force in quelling a protest by ACT UP, a militant AIDS group. "It looked like a police riot," said Larry Gross, one of the panelists.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
BALTIMORE. Ferguson. Detroit. Watts. Harlem. Philadelphia. The through line for the protests sparked in these and other cities, in a history that spans well over 50 years, is not civil rights, or racial tensions. It's police brutality. Questionable arrests, mistreatment or killing of blacks in the past year by police officers in Ferguson, New York and Baltimore were the same sparks that launched the seminal protests of 50 years ago in Detroit, Watts and other places, which fed the larger civil-rights movement.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
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NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
The U.S. Attorney's Office on Monday declined to file criminal charges against a former Bridgeton, Cumberland County, police officer who fatally shot the unarmed passenger in a vehicle during a car stop in December 2014. After a review of the case by the FBI and federal prosecutors, the office determined that former Officer Braheme Days - who told investigators he feared for his life before he shot Jerame Reid, 36 - used justified force. "Allowance must be made for the fact that law enforcement officials are often forced to make split-second judgments in circumstances that are tense, uncertain, and rapidly evolving," the U.S. Attorney's Office said in a statement released Monday afternoon.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
It's all about respect, according to Amir Miller, who pulled his business out of Cherry Hill Mall last month after he was told to stop selling T-shirts calling for an end to police brutality. Since then, Miller has received a corporate apology. He was invited to bring his business, Teary Eyez, back to the mall to sell a variety of T-shirts again, including the ones that raised the controversy. He also is planning to open a shop in Newport News, Va., where the same corporation owns another mall, Miller said.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Mayor Kenney and Police Commissioner Richard Ross made it clear before the Democratic National Convention began that Philadelphia wouldn't be a "lock-'em-up" city. The resulting restraint paid off big in presenting to the world what one would expect of the City of Brotherly Love. Kenney and Ross were determined to break from the harsher approach that the Police Department took during the 2000 Republican National Convention, which resulted in more than 400 arrests. The majority of those cases were dismissed.
NEWS
July 30, 2016
Barbara Snyder, 62, a homemaker from North Plainfield N.J., was so excited to receive last-minute word that she had a ticket for Thursday's acceptance speech by Hillary Clinton, it took her just three hours - door to door - to get from her house to the Wells Fargo Center. "To be here tonight to see Hillary accept the nomination is the culmination of a lot of hope," she said. Snyder said she was still hearing echoes of Clinton's 1969 Wellesley College commencement speech - five years after Clinton had left Wellesley, and Snyder started there as a freshman.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, STAFF WRITER
When Depelsha McGruder, 43, of Brooklyn, started a Facebook group called "M.O.B.B. - Mothers of Black Boys" earlier this month, she didn't expect that by the end of July it would grow to include almost 117,000 moms from all over the country, all concerned for their black sons in their interactions with police. She also didn't expect that she'd get to meet some of these women for the first time at the Democratic National Convention here. On Thursday afternoon, McGruder, who has two sons, ages 7 and 4, gathered with about a dozen women outside City Hall . She carried a bag of T-shirts that read: "I Can't Keep Calm, I Have a Black Son. " McGruder said her goal for the group, which changed its name to Moms of Black Boys United, is to create a sustained effort to end police brutality and change society's perceptions of black men and boys . "We don't want our sons to be a hashtag," she said.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
When the lights came up, revealing nine African American women standing in a circle, as if in prayer, delegates and guests at the Democratic National Convention broke into a chant: "Black Lives Matter! Black Lives Matter! Black Lives Matter!" Then the crowd quieted to listen to the Mothers of the Movement, women whose children died at the hands of police or in bursts of gun violence. They were there to testify for presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. "She knows that when a young black life is cut short, it's not just a personal loss, it's . . . a loss that diminishes all of us," said Geneva Reed-Veal, whose daughter, Sandra Bland, was found hanged by a twisted plastic garbage back in a Texas jail in 2015.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
It was the start of the 2016 ESPY Awards and there were four superstars onstage - LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade and Chris Paul - standing extra tall as they spoke out against police brutality and called on their fellow athletes to do the same. It was a powerful moment. All those multi-millionaire athletes. Each his own mega-brand. Standing up for something besides just getting richer and winning NBA championships. My favorite part was when James, dressed in a classic black tuxedo, gazed into a camera and said, "It's time to look in the mirror and ask ourselves, 'what are we doing to bring about change?
NEWS
July 21, 2016
ISSUE | VIOLENCE End police bias, economic injustice The Opportunities Industrialization Center of America (OICA) mourns the senseless deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and the officers killed in Dallas ("Obama: Don't despair," July 13). The issues of police brutality, most notably against African Americans, and attacks on police are serious issues that our country must address while also working to put an end to racial discrimination. OICA stands with those who are working to root out injustices.
NEWS
July 20, 2016
Four violent July days have pushed the country deeper into a state of what the French sociologist Émile Durkheim called anomie - turmoil born of a breakdown of societal standards. On July 5, Baton Rouge, La., police fatally shot Alton Sterling after tackling him in a convenience store parking lot where he was selling CDs. On July 6, a St. Anthony, Minn., police officer stopped Philando Castile for a busted taillight and ended up killing him in front of his girlfriend and her daughter.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel and Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITERS
Several dozen demonstrators walked six miles on North Broad Street on Sunday night, marching to keep their message that Black Lives Matter in the public eye. "Black Lives Matter just wants justice," said A.J. Jenkins, 21. "We just want equality. We don't hate cops; we hate police brutality. " Jenkins was among about 50 people who walked from Broad Street and Olney Avenue to City Hall, escorted by police, who directed traffic. The protest was part of a national movement seeking to draw attention to police brutality directed toward African Americans, including instances when officers have shot unarmed black men. The march was subdued compared with the heated confrontations between protesters and police in Philadelphia a week ago. When Sunday's demonstrators arrived at City Hall, they sat on the building's steps or talked in small groups.
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