CollectionsPolice Code
IN THE NEWS

Police Code

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Sharon Hill firehouse and the municipal building will get new curbs and sidewalks, at a cost of $11,980. The Borough Council on Thursday awarded a contract for the work to Alexander Pastuszek Contractors of Swarthmore. The vote was 6-0. Councilwoman Mary Schraepfer was absent. The contract was awarded to Pastuszek subject to review by the borough engineer. "We're coming into the cold weather. If we wait until the spring, we might not have it done in time for (next year's)
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | By Claire Furia, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Newtown Township Board of Supervisors on Tuesday dropped the firm that has been performing its traffic signal maintenance for 15 years and signed on with Lobec Inc. of Broomall for a one-year pact. The supervisors chose Lobec, whose bid was $3,900, over Signal Service Inc. of Exton, the township's long-term provider whose bid was $6,300. "I thought it was time to put it out to bid," said Township Manager Larry M. Comunale, who added that Lobec had been lauded by area townships.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
THE PHILADELPHIA Parking Authority is spotlighted in an A&E cable TV show titled "Parking Wars. " If A&E were to do one on the Philadelphia Police Department, I suggest the title "Fireproof. " Just what do you have to do to get yourself fired, if you're a Philadelphia cop? Just how bad to the bone must you be? The latest awful example is Officer Michael Paige, 45, driving a patrol car marked with the words "Honor, Service, Integrity" — the Philly cops motto — but his honor is besmirched, his service suspect, his integrity questioned.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Newtown Township police officers facing disciplinary action will have 10 days to seek a hearing before the Board of Supervisors under an amendment to the police code approved by the board at its Monday meeting. The change is a procedural one, according to Township Manager Larry M. Comunale. Previously, the board could suspend an officer and then hear the officer's appeal, Comunale said before the meeting. "The courts have said that . . . it denies due process if the same body that makes the decision hears the appeal.
NEWS
January 30, 1986 | By Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
An Atlantic City police officer was arrested yesterday for allegedly aiding in the theft of jewelry and furs. Dan J. Neville, 33, was charged with misconduct in office, burglary, theft and conspiracy to commit burglary in the theft last week of more than $10,700 worth of fox and nutria furs and jewelry, said Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey Blitz. Neville, who surrendered to police at his attorney's office, was later released from custody and ordered to appear at an arraignment at 9 a.m. today in Superior Court in Mays Landing.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Newtown Township supervisors are considering amendments to the police code that would allow the township manager in an emergency to suspend a police officer without revoking his or her pay. Normally, Township Solicitor Robert J. Sugarman said at the board's meeting Monday, an officer cannot be suspended without a hearing from the board. The proposed amendments would allow for an emergency suspension with pay. "That is the major change," he said. "The officer has the right to a hearing before a suspension," Sugarman said.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors yesterday recommended that five former Upper Darby police officers be jailed for at least nine years for civil rights violations and an attempted cover-up of their crimes. "The defendants' crimes are appalling - the stuff of a police state," wrote Assistant U.S. Attorneys Ronald H. Levine and James J. Eisenhower III, the case prosecutors. The recommendation to U.S. District Judge James McGirr Kelly stems from the defendants' convictions earlier this year for violating the civil rights of an 18-year-old township resident and his father in 1988.
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was a time about 15 months ago when it seemed the four-year investigation of corruption by Philadelphia police was nearing an end. "The investigation is running its course," U.S. Attorney Edward S. G. Dennis Jr. said in February 1987 of the federal government probe. But now it seems that a new vein of corruption may have been found by local investigators. Yesterday's indictment by a Philadelphia investigating grand jury of seven current and former police officers on racketeering and corruption charges continues a general scouring of the department that has resulted in the convictions of 34 police officers in the last five years - the first in May 1983, the most recent a year ago next week.
NEWS
February 6, 1988 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer Staff Writer Kit Konolige contributed to this report
Thomas J. Gibbons, who worked his way through the ranks to become the first man to hold the title of Philadelphia police commissioner, died yesterday in a convalescent home in Hallandale, Fla. He was 83 and lived in Hollywood, Fla. Gibbons was the stereotype of the Irish cop of old reruns on the late, late show. Only, he was the real thing: big, jovial, witty, but no-nonsense. In fact, it was Gibbons' size - a burly 6-foot-3 - that got him his start in law enforcement. Seeking municipal employment in either engineering or accounting (he attended evening classes at the Wharton School)
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
THE PHILADELPHIA Parking Authority is spotlighted in an A&E cable TV show titled "Parking Wars. " If A&E were to do one on the Philadelphia Police Department, I suggest the title "Fireproof. " Just what do you have to do to get yourself fired, if you're a Philadelphia cop? Just how bad to the bone must you be? The latest awful example is Officer Michael Paige, 45, driving a patrol car marked with the words "Honor, Service, Integrity" — the Philly cops motto — but his honor is besmirched, his service suspect, his integrity questioned.
NEWS
August 29, 2003 | By Alfred Lubrano, Joseph A. Gambardello and Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Transcripts of a relentless chorus of confused police radio dispatches and desperate phone calls from dying workers during the attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, reveal an extraordinary record of a hellish day. Released yesterday in Manhattan on a judge's order, the 2,000 pages of documents from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey chronicle events beginning just after 8:45 a.m. - when American Airlines Flight 11 slammed into the North Tower. The documents depict the extreme disorder caused by the attacks, the scope of which people were slow to comprehend: two plane crashes guided by suicide attackers; jet fuel melting structural steel; two landmark giant buildings, anchors to the New York skyline, about to collapse.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Christopher Cooper
The videotaped beating of Thomas Jones by Philadelphia police officers is yet another incident that calls attention to the nationwide, systematic problems of police brutality and racially discriminatory policing. I am a former U.S. Marine and police officer who has come under gunfire and confronted many fleeing suspects both armed and unarmed. Regardless of the severity of Jones' alleged actions, his having been set upon by a mob composed of law-enforcement agents indicates cowardice and a lack of professionalism by the officers involved.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Borough Council is seeking applicants for the town's top four administrative positions, including police chief, though all the jobs are now filled. In addition to police chief, the jobs of borough manager and code-enforcement director were advertised Sunday in The Inquirer, and the position of borough solicitor was recently advertised in the Legal Intelligencer. Borough Council President Jacquelynn Puriefoy-Brinkley stated at the end of the council meeting Thursday that the jobs would be advertised.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Newtown Township police officers facing disciplinary action will have 10 days to seek a hearing before the Board of Supervisors under an amendment to the police code approved by the board at its Monday meeting. The change is a procedural one, according to Township Manager Larry M. Comunale. Previously, the board could suspend an officer and then hear the officer's appeal, Comunale said before the meeting. "The courts have said that . . . it denies due process if the same body that makes the decision hears the appeal.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Newtown Township supervisors are considering amendments to the police code that would allow the township manager in an emergency to suspend a police officer without revoking his or her pay. Normally, Township Solicitor Robert J. Sugarman said at the board's meeting Monday, an officer cannot be suspended without a hearing from the board. The proposed amendments would allow for an emergency suspension with pay. "That is the major change," he said. "The officer has the right to a hearing before a suspension," Sugarman said.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | By Claire Furia, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Newtown Township Board of Supervisors on Tuesday dropped the firm that has been performing its traffic signal maintenance for 15 years and signed on with Lobec Inc. of Broomall for a one-year pact. The supervisors chose Lobec, whose bid was $3,900, over Signal Service Inc. of Exton, the township's long-term provider whose bid was $6,300. "I thought it was time to put it out to bid," said Township Manager Larry M. Comunale, who added that Lobec had been lauded by area townships.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors yesterday recommended that five former Upper Darby police officers be jailed for at least nine years for civil rights violations and an attempted cover-up of their crimes. "The defendants' crimes are appalling - the stuff of a police state," wrote Assistant U.S. Attorneys Ronald H. Levine and James J. Eisenhower III, the case prosecutors. The recommendation to U.S. District Judge James McGirr Kelly stems from the defendants' convictions earlier this year for violating the civil rights of an 18-year-old township resident and his father in 1988.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Sharon Hill firehouse and the municipal building will get new curbs and sidewalks, at a cost of $11,980. The Borough Council on Thursday awarded a contract for the work to Alexander Pastuszek Contractors of Swarthmore. The vote was 6-0. Councilwoman Mary Schraepfer was absent. The contract was awarded to Pastuszek subject to review by the borough engineer. "We're coming into the cold weather. If we wait until the spring, we might not have it done in time for (next year's)
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was a time about 15 months ago when it seemed the four-year investigation of corruption by Philadelphia police was nearing an end. "The investigation is running its course," U.S. Attorney Edward S. G. Dennis Jr. said in February 1987 of the federal government probe. But now it seems that a new vein of corruption may have been found by local investigators. Yesterday's indictment by a Philadelphia investigating grand jury of seven current and former police officers on racketeering and corruption charges continues a general scouring of the department that has resulted in the convictions of 34 police officers in the last five years - the first in May 1983, the most recent a year ago next week.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|