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Police Protection

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NEWS
May 14, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Sharon Hill Borough Council is preparing an amendment to the borough code that would require organizations holding special events to pay for police protection at those events. Councilman John Scully said at council's regular meeting Thursday, that the amendment to the borough code section requiring permits for public assemblies would be presented at next month's regular meeting. Scully said at the May 4 caucus that he decided to introduce the amendment after a fight broke out on April 28 at a carnival sponsored by the borough athletic association.
NEWS
March 10, 1986 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
John Hall, an Ivyland Borough Council member, has asked that borough officials look into the possibility of obtaining police protection from neighboring Warminster Township. Hall told the council at its Wednesday night meeting that he was concerned about the rising costs of providing police protection on a part-time basis to the borough, which has a population of 620. "For the amount of time that we have a formal patrol, it has taken an exceptionally large portion of our budget," Hall added in a telephone interview Friday.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
Philadelphia police are now keeping watch over the homes of two central figures in the ongoing shake-up of the city Sheriff's Office. Deputy Commissioner Richard Ross said last night that district cops are "periodically" checking on the houses of City Controller Alan Butkovitz and acting Sheriff Barbara Deeley, as a precaution. Ross said that neither official asked for any police protection, but he said that the move seemed prudent given all the recent and dramatic upheaval of the office.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | By Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer
About 75 residents of several Northeast Philadelphia neighborhoods braved bitter cold this morning to decry what they consider a lack of police protection. Several said a catalyst for the protest was last week's baseball-bat beating of a Mayfair teen-ager who was trying to break up a fight outside a St. Hubert's Catholic High School for Girls. The condition of the victim, James Schmitt Jr., 19, of St. Vincent Street near Crispin, improved to fair this morning at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | By Martha Woodall and Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia police and school district security officers have been providing round-the-clock protection for Schools Superintendent Constance E. Clayton since she received about a dozen harassing phone calls late last week. Police said none of the callers had threatened Clayton. According to police sources, school district security officers are being stationed overnight at her house in Mount Airy and are providing extra protection at the School Administration Building, 21st Street and the Parkway.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Kurt Heine contributed to this report
Schools Superintendent Constance E. Clayton has been given round-the-clock protection after receiving about a dozen telephone calls last week that police described as "harassment. " The Police Department has assigned two detectives to Clayton when she makes public appearances, and School District security officers have been watching her home at night as a result of the phone calls. District officials had little to say about the calls. Police said one was made to Clayton's Mount Airy home, while others were made to her office.
NEWS
August 29, 1986
In regards to a judge's ruling that we do not have a constitutional right to police protection, how interesting that suspected criminals have a right not to be beaten by the police and that they have a constitutional right not to incriminate themselves. But an innocent woman being raped does not have a constitutional right to police protection. How paradoxical! How illogical! How sick! Kristine Strickler Willow Grove.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Melinda Deanna Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
The possibility of forming a regional police department is under discussion in Wallace Township, where a public meeting on the issue has been scheduled for Oct. 7. John Miller, chairman of the Wallace Township Board of Supervisors, said at a meeting Wednesday that the supervisors had met with officials from West Brandywine and had discussed the possibility of joining their part-time police departments to oversee the two townships with one full-time...
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
A campaign issue in West Brandywine - the cost of police protection - has spilled into Wallace. The two townships share a police force and the costs of police enforcement. At a supervisors' meeting Wednesday night, Wallace Supervisor William Moore complained about a campaign letter distributed by Ronald A. Rambo in his quest for a third term on the West Brandywine Board of Supervisors. Rambo, a Democrat, lost Tuesday to Josef G. Obernier, a Republican, by 30 votes, 641 to 671. According to Moore, Rambo's letter to his West Brandywine constituents stated that as of January 1991 they were paying $36.13 an hour for police salaries and benefits while Wallace residents were paying $12.79.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Marjorie Keen and Michele Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Valley Township, in the throes of a police funding crisis, this week trimmed the work week of its five full-time police officers and laid off its four part-time officers. Full-time officers were informed that, effective last Monday, their hours were being cut back from 40 hours to 36 hours per week, according to Valley officials, who added that the part-time officers had been working only a few hours anyway. As of Aug. 31, Valley police had used all but $38,000 of the $219,000 budgeted for police work for 1991.
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NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University will expand its police patrol borders by about 25 percent to improve coverage for students who live in off-campus housing, the university announced Wednesday. The expansion encompasses about 20 square blocks around the university's North Philadelphia campus, increasing its total coverage area to about 100 square blocks, said Charles J. Leone, executive director of Campus Safety Services. The move follows a string of violent attacks on Temple students that occurred one day last March in an area just beyond the Temple police patrol boundaries.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DONNY SMITH, president of the Mayfair Civic Association, wants to split the sprawling 15th Police District into two districts, with a guaranteed number of officers patrolling each neighborhood. Right now, Smith said, the quieter neighborhoods like his suffer quality-of-life crimes, such as theft when cops are busy responding to the 15th's high-crime areas. "We're a blue-collar neighborhood," Smith said. "People are at work all day. They don't want to come home to find their house was broken into because there aren't enough police patrolling the streets here.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG The Pennsylvania State Police has agreed to cut its round-the-clock security for the wife of Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley after it became apparent the agency was spending more on travel costs this year to protect her than it was to protect him. From July through the end of September, the state police paid $81,000 in travel expenses to protect Suzanne Cawley, or $20,000 more than for her husband's detail. The reason: Suzanne Cawley resumed working in May as a full-time real estate agent in New York City, a job that required her to spend several days at a time out of state.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN 1986, when the smoke from the MOVE cataclysm still stained the air over Powelton Village, Patrick Artur and his family had to seek police protection. Artur, longtime lawyer for the Fraternal Order of Police, represented police officers who were called before the commission investigating the disaster but refused to incriminate themselves. There was never any real danger to the Arturs, and, in fact, Patrick later became friendly with Ramona Africa, who, with Birdie Africa, were the only survivors of the May 13, 1985, holocaust when police dropped a bomb on the roof of the headquarters of the back-to-nature group, killing 11 people, including five children, and destroying a neighborhood.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 30 years ago, as Charles J. Kocher and fellow officer Raymond Garrison patrolled the streets of Camden, the two got the idea of creating a city police museum, and they did, one item at a time. Officers and family members fetched old uniforms, batons, and badges from attics and lent photos dating to the 1920s. In 1981, the display opened in the lobby of the department's new Federal Street headquarters. Among the exhibits were a microphone from a two-way 1930s radio and snapshots of "potato sacks" - wool, below-the-knee police coats - and of green police wagons from the 1950s.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration announced Friday that it would not appeal an arbitration award to Philadelphia's police force, providing raises of 3 percent, retroactive to July 1, and an additional 4 percent next July 1. The package is projected to cost $15.5 million this year and about $150 million over the next five years. The 3 percent retroactive raise will add about $1,800 to the average police officer salary of $61,000. Despite the costs, the administration says its five-year contract with the Fraternal Order of Police provided significant structural improvements, the biggest a self-insurance plan for health benefits that will save taxpayers millions of dollars.
NEWS
January 6, 2013
With a date certain now set for the Camden Police Department to go out of business, it becomes even more crucial to avoid any reduction in public safety in one of America's deadliest cities. The plan to shut down the department cleared a final hurdle last week when the New Jersey Civil Service Commission gave its approval to lay off the entire 270-member force by April 30. That gives Mayor Dana L. Redd the green light to replace the force with one run by Camden County. Now Redd must master a smooth transition that ensures no lapse in police protection for Camden's 79,000 residents.
NEWS
February 25, 2012 | By Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - One of Egypt's top presidential contenders demanded police protection Friday after masked men stopped his car on the way back from a campaign event, beat him with the butt of an automatic rifle, and stole his vehicle - an attack that many of his supporters fear may not have been random. A lawmaker from the country's most powerful political party, the Muslim Brotherhood, also was wounded in a hit-and-run Friday. The two events demonstrate the disintegration of security in the country since the uprising a year ago that toppled former president Hosni Mubarak.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Veselin Toshkov, Associated Press
SOFIA, Bulgaria - Gays and lesbians marched in several Eastern European capitals Saturday protected by hundreds of riot police after some extremist groups urged members to stop the gay-pride rallies. Nearly 1,000 people joined the fourth Gay Pride rally in the Bulgarian capital of Sofia, organizers said. Twice as many paraded through the Croatian capital of Zagreb under rainbow arches of balloons and banners for that city's 10th Gay Pride March. Hungarian gay-rights activists also took to the streets in Budapest, flanked by police in full riot gear.
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