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Police Vehicles

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NEWS
February 3, 2010 | By Darran Simon INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden Police Department has corrected inspection problems involving 25 of its vehicles, most of them Ford Crown Victoria cruisers, police and state officials said yesterday. The Department of Labor and Workforce Development cited the department in November for maintaining a hazardous workplace by failing to have the vehicles properly inspected as required by state law. Some had stickers that showed they had failed inspection. Others had expired stickers or none at all. One Ford van was overdue for an inspection that should have been performed in September 2002.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Mark de la Vina, Inquirer Staff Writer
With an average of 53,000 to 58,000 miles on their odometers, Caln police cars will have to be replaced within the next few years. Police Chief James Franciscus had asked the township Board of Commissioners earlier for backups. "The earliest we can place an order (for a new car) is in November, and we won't get it until March, so it looks like the kind of situation where we'll have to go out and bid," Vice President Alan Jarvis said at Thursday's commissioners meeting. The board said it would accommodate Franciscus' request.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | By Clea Benson and Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A shooting at a basketball game in Southwest Center City last night wounded four young people and set off a chain of events that led to a collision between police vehicles that sent four officers to the hospital. Authorities said three of the shooting victims were in critical condition early today: a 20-year-old man and two girls, 16 and 17. The man, who was shot in the head, was clinging to life at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The 16-year-old, who was hit in the chest, was taken to the same hospital.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
When Deputy Fire Chief Anthony Sneidar arrived at the scene of the fatal Amtrak derailment last year, he was blocked by a swarm of police vehicles. It had been 15 minutes since Train 188 had crashed rounding the Frankford Curve in the city's Port Richmond section. Despite the live wires on the tracks, Philadelphia police officers were extricating the wounded from the wreckage. Sneidar was there to bring order to the chaos by seeing that victims were rapidly assessed and taken by ambulance to the right trauma center for their needs.
NEWS
March 17, 2004 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police were pursuing a Williamstown man last fall at speeds of more than 110 m.p.h. before the driver - high on cocaine - crashed into another car, killing a Gloucester Township man and himself, Camden County Prosecutor Vincent P. Sarubbi said yesterday. Sarubbi said no criminal charges would be brought against the Bellmawr officer who initiated the Nov. 25 chase that climaxed in a Haddonfield neighborhood. "This chase, however, certainly raises issues of potential violations of the state guidelines that the local chiefs of police need to review," Sarubbi said.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
Voorhees Township is planning to maintain its police vehicles itself instead of using private garages. On Monday, the Voorhees Township Committee hired Milton White, a mechanic who will work out of the public-works department, and awarded a $17,264 bid to the Sun Electric Corp. of Mount Laurel for an engine analyzer. The township already repairs its public-works vehicles but receives bids from private garages to its repair police cars, township administrator Charles F. Mann said.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mental-health worker was hospitalized in stable condition yesterday after going on a rampage that included stabbing his supervisor in an Upper Roxborough group home and later crashing a stolen car into several federal government police vehicles in Center City. Benjamin Gay, 28, was captured in front of the federal courthouse in the 600 block of Market Street after a struggle with police. He was admitted to Hahnemann University Hospital and later charged with a string of offenses that included attempted murder, auto theft, driving under the influence of drugs, and criminal mischief.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
A plan to reduce maintenance costs on police vehicles by replacing them each year with new cars has been presented to the Sharon Hill Borough Council. During a caucus meeting Thursday night, council member Bernard Foster said the plan would save the borough about $8,000 in repair costs each year. In addition, Foster estimated that the proposal would reduce police radio maintenance costs by about $1,000 each year. He said two new vehicles would cost about $28,000, and that the two older vehicles would be worth $5,000 apiece when they were traded in. Police Chief William Hanna said that borough police put about 45,000 miles on each of the cars yearly.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
A six-mile chase that involved 15 police vehicles ended with the arrest of a 21-year-old Clifton Heights man on a drunken-driving charge. The chase began after a two-vehicle accident near the intersection of Church Lane and Pembroke Avenue, East Lansdowne, about 7 p.m. Sunday. Police gave this account: An officer saw a van driven by Francis J. MacNeil, 21, of the 200 block of West Baltimore Avenue, Clifton Heights, hit a Plymouth sedan and leave the scene. The officer pursued the van through five municipalities.
NEWS
December 19, 1986 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The parents of Sam Agresta Jr., who was fatally shot by police a year ago in South Philadelphia, filed suit yesterday in federal court, asserting that the Police Department wrongfully killed Agresta and concealed the circumstances of his death. The suit was brought by Samuel Agresta Sr. and Tina Agresta of Cherry Hill and their business, Holiday Creations. It seeks $80 million in damages and the abolishment of the department's stakeout unit. Named as defendants are the Police Department, former Police Commissioner Gregore J. Sambor, Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker, police Officers Daniel Baker, Al Doman, Thomas Fitzpatrick, James Gillespie and "several unknown police officers.
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NEWS
August 18, 2016
No officers were hurt when two police vehicles crashed into each other Tuesday night in the city's Logan section, police said. About 6:45 p.m., police were responding to a report of gunfire in the area of Broad Street and Olney Avenue when a SWAT vehicle collided with a 35th District vehicle in the 1300 block of Tabor Road, police said. The vehicles suffered moderate damage. The shooting turned out to be people shooting fireworks. One person was apprehended after a foot chase, police said.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A man was taken into custody Friday following a two-hour standoff with police in North Philadelphia after he allegedly stole an SUV, fled from the authorities, and pointed what looked like a real gun at an officer, police said Saturday. The 48-year-old man, whose name was not released, was spotted by patrol officers in North Philadelphia around 6 p.m. Friday driving a stolen 2013 Ford Escape, police said. The officers, in police vehicles, stopped the driver at 16th Street and Allegheny Avenue, police said, and the man then got out of the SUV and pushed an officer aside, almost knocking her to the ground.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
When Deputy Fire Chief Anthony Sneidar arrived at the scene of the fatal Amtrak derailment last year, he was blocked by a swarm of police vehicles. It had been 15 minutes since Train 188 had crashed rounding the Frankford Curve in the city's Port Richmond section. Despite the live wires on the tracks, Philadelphia police officers were extricating the wounded from the wreckage. Sneidar was there to bring order to the chaos by seeing that victims were rapidly assessed and taken by ambulance to the right trauma center for their needs.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attempted drug arrest sparked a wild chase Tuesday night in Northeast Philadelphia as a car rammed two police vehicles while speeding through several neighborhoods trying to get away, police said. Police captured the driver and passenger of the Mercury Grand Marquis and planned to charge them, Chief Inspector Scott Small said. Only the driver was injured. The sequence of events began around 9 p.m., when narcotics officers approached the Mercury in a parking lot at Cottman and Torresdale Avenues to announce a drug arrest, Small said.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The vehicle in the crash that killed one Pennsylvania State University student and injured six others Sunday swerved before it overturned, state police said Monday. The sport utility vehicle carrying the students home from a fund-raising trip was traveling west on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Charlestown Township, Chester County, when it swerved from the right lane onto the shoulder around 1:50 p.m. Sunday, police said. The 2004 Envoy then abruptly turned back onto the road. Then it swerved to the right again and overturned, police said.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Washington Township police officer charged in connection with what prosecutors deemed an illegitimate arrest of an assemblyman in 2012 has been found not guilty on all counts. A 12-member jury cleared Joseph DiBuonaventura on 14 charges early Tuesday, the second day of deliberations. DiBuonaventura's charges - which included tampering with records, falsifying records, and official misconduct - stemmed from the July 2012 afternoon traffic stop and arrest of Assemblyman Paul D. Moriarty (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the last nine years, the $52,000 camera system in West Deptford's police cruisers functioned well. It recorded intoxicated drivers swerving through lanes or later stumbling on their feet. Sometimes the footage helped prevent lengthy drags through the court system, because, as West Deptford Prosecutor John Moustakas said, "You really don't have a defense. " But in the last year, the cameras began begging for repairs, much like an outdated laptop. Some recorded audio but no video, or vice versa.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A retired Camden City police officer working as a civilian employee for the new county force is accused of posing as a police officer and robbing a pedestrian while on the job, authorities said Wednesday. Richard Dayton, 45, of Haddon Township, was charged Wednesday with second-degree robbery and official misconduct. He was being held in the Camden County Jail on $50,000 bail, said the Camden County Prosecutor's Office and Camden County Police. Dayton joined the city force in 1997 and retired on a disability pension in 2005 after he was hit by a state trooper while on duty in 2004.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
Cameras have become so common in public places that motorists might assume they are headed straight to video any time police make a traffic stop. That's not always true, but perhaps it should be. A video record of what took place could be good for the motorist, as well as the officer, to combat false accusations. That's why a bill that would make video-recording devices standard equipment for all municipal police patrol cars in New Jersey makes sense. The legislation, sponsored by Assemblyman Paul Moriarty (D., Gloucester)
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