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NEWS
April 12, 2005 | By William P. Barber Sr
April 12 seems like an ordinary date, doesn't it? Just another spring day. But April 12 should be remembered with gratitude. Fifty years ago today, scientists announced that Jonas Salk's vaccine for a dreaded disease - poliomyelitis, better known as polio or infantile paralysis - was safe and effective. Polio! Every year, that word struck quiet terror into the hearts of parents everywhere, especially as summer drew near. That cruel disease, for which there was no cure, was responsible as so many boys and girls traded their once-strong bodies for prone positions in noisy iron lungs or for iron leg braces.
NEWS
November 18, 2002
It's easy to forget the United Nations does more than joust over Security Council resolutions about weapons inspections and going to war. The United Nations' system includes 15 agencies grappling with life-and-death issues that know no borders. One of those is eradicating polio, and one of the organizations is UNICEF. UNICEF reported last week the start of a campaign to vaccinate 60 million children under age 5 in 16 West African nations. It is part of a global effort to vanquish polio, a disease many Americans thought already had been beaten.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Sebastian Abbot, Associated Press
LAHORE, Pakistan - Under police guard, thousands of health workers pressed on with a polio immunization program Thursday after nine were killed elsewhere in Pakistan by suspected militants opposed to the vaccination campaign. Immunizations were halted in parts of Pakistan and the U.N. suspended its field participation everywhere until better security was arranged for its workers. The violence risks reversing recent progress fighting polio in Pakistan, one of three countries where the disease is endemic.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOROTHY ANN Richardson was not about to let a childhood bout with polio keep her from a fulfilling life. Although she was not as quick on her feet as her contemporaries, Dorothy held numerous jobs, raised three children, was a pillar of her church and was famous for her cheerful disposition and love of a good joke. She died July 24 of heart disease at the age of 74. She lived in Southwest Philadelphia. Dorothy was a daughter of the South and brought her talent for soul-food cooking with her when she moved to Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Robert M. Reinish, 79, of Holland, an engineer who had been disabled by polio while in the Army, died Sunday of bone cancer at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township. During World War II, while serving with the Army in Italy, he contracted what was later diagnosed as polio. "He was paralyzed from the neck down and discharged on disability," said his wife of many years, Betty Hummel Reinish. "I was his nurse at the Army hospital in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., which [was and]
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frances J. Calvert Wolfe, 74, of Collingdale, who with her faith and the support of her husband was able to care for her home and children despite living most of her adult life with polio, died Wednesday at home. Since just before her 30th birthday, Mrs. Wolfe lived with the effects of polio, which robbed her of 75 percent of her mobility and forced her to use a wheelchair. She also survived cancer, undergoing a hysterectomy and mastectomy in the 1950s, as well as many other illnesses.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Actress Mia Farrow's new job as a special representative for the U.N. Children's Fund has personal meaning when it comes to speaking out about the need to eradicate polio. Farrow herself was infected with polio as a 9-year-old but recovered. Her 12-year-old son, Thaddeus, who contracted the disease in a Calcutta orphanage, wasn't so lucky and is paralyzed from the waist down. "I live with the effects of polio every single day," Farrow said last week. "So I feel doubly motivated to see the end of polio.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | By Acel Moore
Earlier this month I got a telephone call from a man whom I have known for 35 years. The call was from Arnold Snyder, 76, a retired pharmacist and a decorated Second World War veteran. Whenever he calls me, it is to talk about his efforts to help others. He is an advocate for the disabled and is currently in the middle of raising funds and support for a veterans' memorial in Cheltenham Township. He has petitioned the township and the school board to name Cheltenham High School's football field after Wallace Triplett, a 1945 graduate and one of the school's great athletes.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frances Calvert was the comely girl on the corner of Pembroke Avenue, tall and slender, with a face as bright and round as the moon, and eyes the palest blue. When Richard Wolfe and his family moved to East Lansdowne, just two doors down the block, it took him three months to ask her out for a sundae and three years to marry her, but no time at all, perhaps seconds, to fall in love, and for good. "I mean, look at her, did I have a choice?" he says, now three months shy of 75, gazing at his wife across the room.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
Polio's persistence is all too visible in the Third World. In India, thousands of polio survivors cannot afford braces, a wheelchair or rehabilitation. Health workers call them "crawlers. " They skitter like crabs across intersections. Some fashion pieces of wood into skateboards to push themselves along. Others turn bicycle wheels into tricycles, using their arms to pedal. They are people like Noorhussain, who crawls out of the Old Delhi rag shop where he lives, crosses a busy street, and spends the day begging.
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NEWS
January 1, 2016
By Steve Young Huzzah! The long, dark night that was 2015 is almost over. The past year produced as much delight as former Eagles coach Chip Kelly might get from finding out his new roommate is sports radio talker Angelo Cataldi. Yet despite the mass shootings, the bombings, and the possible banning of 5-year-old Muslims from entering the country, take heart and a deep breath. Before Muslim countries threaten to ban all Republicans, we can grow from 2015's difficulties. Adversity can be a stepping stone to something better.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eleanor "Pattie" Burns, 94, a longtime resident of Center City who devoted her life to caring for children after her own childhood was sidelined by polio, died Wednesday, Aug. 5, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She had been living at St. Monica Manor in Philadelphia. During the 1970s and 1980s, Miss Burns was a familiar figure in Rittenhouse Square, where she could be seen in animated conversation with a child as she wheeled a stroller or led a toddler through the park.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AL FERGUSON was an exuberant and excitable sports fan. During one of the Flyers' runs for the Stanley Cup in the 1970s, he got so excited watching a game on TV that he leaped up and knocked a tile out of the ceiling. It's not recorded what his wife thought of that mishap, but Al treated it with his usual good humor. "That didn't stop the excitement of the game," his family said. "Instead, it was something to laugh about. " Alfred F. Ferguson, who overcame polio as a child; a lifelong civil servant, holding important positions in state and federal agencies; a devotee of the Jersey Shore and all its delights; and a loyal family man, died Dec. 13 after a long battle with cancer.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* THE ROOSEVELTS: AN INTIMATE HISTORY. 8 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 20, WHYY12.   GEOFFREY C. Ward went into his interview with filmmaker Ken Burns determined to hold it together on camera. But as the biographer and longtime Burns collaborator speaks about Franklin D. Roosevelt being stricken with polio in 1921, for the fourth installment of PBS' "The Roosevelts: An Intimate History," he appears a bit choked up. "It produces terror," says Ward in one of the most moving passages of the series, which premieres Sunday and runs for 14 hours over seven nights.
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caroline Anderson Burnett, 97, formerly of Swarthmore, a polio survivor who defied doctors' predictions that she would never walk again or have a child, died Monday, Aug. 25, of causes related to aging at her home at Kendal at Longwood. "My mom faced life's challenges with bravery, dignity, tenacity, and good humor," said her daughter, Betsy Burnett. Mrs. Burnett grew up during the Great Depression, attended Douglass College on a full scholarship, and married in 1946 when Lucian Burnett returned from World War II. In 1953, tragedy struck.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SPRINTER MEL PATTON, who set the world record of 9.3 seconds in the 100-yard dash in 1948, told Sports Illustrated that the man who would beat it would be "tall and strong and quick, a young giant with the reflexes of a cat. " Along came Frank Budd of Villanova University, hardly a giant at 5-10, 172 pounds. He may have been quick, but you could have fooled the coaches. He never seemed to be in a hurry, and had a "who, me worry?" approach to life. "He just hustles along," a Sports Illustrated columnist wrote in 1961.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
GAZIANTEP, Turkey - Just when you thought you had the measure of the war crimes in Syria, the Assad regime goes one worse. The Syrian government is blocking efforts to distribute polio vaccine to children in opposition-controlled areas, who are the most endangered after an outbreak in October. More shocking, the United Nations and the international community are bowing to Assad and failing to get the vaccine to the children. This timidity could spark a polio epidemic throughout the Mideast.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOROTHY ANN Richardson was not about to let a childhood bout with polio keep her from a fulfilling life. Although she was not as quick on her feet as her contemporaries, Dorothy held numerous jobs, raised three children, was a pillar of her church and was famous for her cheerful disposition and love of a good joke. She died July 24 of heart disease at the age of 74. She lived in Southwest Philadelphia. Dorothy was a daughter of the South and brought her talent for soul-food cooking with her when she moved to Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at the Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
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