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Polio Vaccine

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NEWS
October 23, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
There is little likelihood that a vaccine developed by former Wistar Institute director Dr. Hilary Koprowski 35 years ago helped start the AIDS epidemic, a panel of scientists concluded yesterday. The panel's report, presented at New York University Medical Center, was sparked by a March Rolling Stone magazine article which held that the AIDS virus could have mutated from a monkey virus contaminating the vaccine tested in the Congo in 1957, touching off the current world epidemic.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at the Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a dispute with an air of déjà vu, Hilary Koprowski - the brilliant and feisty 93-year-old researcher who developed the first oral polio vaccine - is suing Thomas Jefferson University, where he moved in 1992 after being ousted as director of the Wistar Institute. In legal papers filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, Koprowski claims Jefferson has violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by refusing to let him retain - at his own expense - five employees who help him deal with age-related infirmities that "affect his ability to sit, stand, walk, and hear.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A world-renowned Philadelphia scientist has sued the Associated Press for libel, claiming the wire service maliciously accused him of "being responsible for the introduction and spread of AIDS in human beings. " The scientist is Dr. Hilary Koprowski, one of the developers of the first oral polio vaccine and the man who built the Wistar Institute into an internationally respected biomedical research facility. In a lawsuit filed by attorney Richard A. Sprague in Common Pleas Court, Koprowski contends the AP libeled him by reporting that a still-existing sample of the polio vaccine he helped develop in the late 1950s had tested positive for "a type of AIDS virus found in monkeys.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Frozen deep in a locked refrigerator in University City, a remnant of decades-old vaccine has become the center of a medical mystery: Could the deadly AIDS epidemic have been spawned in a Philadelphia lab? A new book by a British journalist has revived theories of a possible link between an early polio vaccine and the growth of AIDS in central Africa, the area known as a launch-pad for the immunity-crippling disease that has killed more than 16 million people worldwide. This time, the prestigious Wistar Institute and two of its former scientists vow to have independent tests done on what's left of the vaccine, even though it's not clear whether the tests - or the scientists' repeated denials - will put speculation to rest.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Was a monumental effort to conquer polio responsible for unleashing the world AIDS pandemic? That is the question that will be addressed tomorrow and Tuesday at an extraordinary meeting of the Royal Society of London, one of the world's most distinguished scientific bodies. At issue is whether a massive trial of an oral polio vaccine developed by Hilary Koprowski, former director of Philadelphia's Wistar Institute, inadvertently triggered the AIDS epidemic, which has stricken 53 million people, most of them in Africa.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to examine a claim against the government for compensation for a child stricken with polio after receiving a dose of government-licensed vaccine. At issue is a 1946 federal law that allows citizens to seek damages for careless government conduct - unless it involved a failure to perform "a discretionary function or duty. " In a key interpretation of what that means, the court unanimously ruled in a Varig Airlines case in 1984 that the Federal Aviation Administration could not be sued for negligently failing to find a defect that caused a commercial air disaster.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Wistar Institute is moving ahead with plans to test a sample of a 40-year-old polio vaccine to see if it was contaminated with an early form of the AIDS virus from a chimpanzee. A controversial new book, The River, has renewed concerns that the oral vaccine, developed at Wistar and tested on one million children in central Africa from 1957 to 1960, may have accidentally triggered the AIDS pandemic, which has now stricken 33 million people around the world. Many scientists regard the book's hypothesis as far-fetched.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory panel yesterday recommended a major change in the way children are immunized against polio, noting that the oral polio vaccine now in routine use is the sole cause of polio in this country. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended replacing the first two doses of the oral vaccine - which is made from a weakened form of a live virus - with two doses of an injectable vaccine made from a killed virus. Eight to 10 cases of polio are blamed each year in this country on the oral vaccine, but there have been no cases of naturally occurring polio in the United States since 1979.
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NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
GAZIANTEP, Turkey - Just when you thought you had the measure of the war crimes in Syria, the Assad regime goes one worse. The Syrian government is blocking efforts to distribute polio vaccine to children in opposition-controlled areas, who are the most endangered after an outbreak in October. More shocking, the United Nations and the international community are bowing to Assad and failing to get the vaccine to the children. This timidity could spark a polio epidemic throughout the Mideast.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at the Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Jamal Khan, Associated Press
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - The United Nations suspended its polio vaccination drive in Pakistan on Wednesday after eight people involved in the effort were shot dead in the past two days, a U.N. official said. The suspension was a grave blow to the drive to bring an end to the scourge of polio in Pakistan, one of only three countries where the crippling disease still survives. On Wednesday, gunmen shot at a woman working on the campaign in northwest Pakistan, killing her and her driver, one of five attacks during the day on polio workers.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a dispute with an air of déjà vu, Hilary Koprowski - the brilliant and feisty 93-year-old researcher who developed the first oral polio vaccine - is suing Thomas Jefferson University, where he moved in 1992 after being ousted as director of the Wistar Institute. In legal papers filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, Koprowski claims Jefferson has violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by refusing to let him retain - at his own expense - five employees who help him deal with age-related infirmities that "affect his ability to sit, stand, walk, and hear.
NEWS
April 12, 2005 | By Julian Lob-Levyt and Ciro A. de Quadros
Fifty years ago today, we were introduced to the polio vaccine, an invention that transformed the nation and eventually the world. It is hard to imagine what it must have been like to be a parent in 1954, unable to protect your child from a disease indiscriminately snatching futures and lives. Thanks to this vaccine, today's parents don't have to. With the polio vaccine, and many others now routine in pediatric care, American children are now protected from diseases that 50 years ago terrorized their grandparents.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just two weeks after the world heard the Salk polio vaccine was safe and effective, children started dying from it. In a little-remembered chapter of polio history, about 40,000 children in the United States developed temporary symptoms of the crippling disease after being injected with vaccine that inadvertently contained live polio virus. Five children died and 51 were permanently paralyzed by the faulty vaccine, which was pulled off the market, according to Paul Offit, an infectious disease doctor who has researched the case.
NEWS
April 4, 2005 | By Mitchell Warren, David Metzger and Lora Pearson
This month marks the 50th anniversary of one of the greatest achievements of the last century: Jonas Salk's polio vaccine. Few people now can recall the decades-long search for this vaccine, and how it involved many unsuccessful attempts and relied on the help of thousands of volunteers. But ultimately, the search was successful and the vaccine was proved effective. Today, the great scientific and public-health challenge is the search for a vaccine against AIDS, and just like half a century ago, volunteers in clinical trials can play a critical role in those efforts - including some in our region.
NEWS
September 13, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the Al Aelaam district of Baghdad, two women carrying a cooler full of polio vaccine and pieces of blue chalk go house to house, knocking on doors and squeezing two drops of the slightly bitter liquid into the mouth of each child under 5 years old. Though most of the children wail, mothers and fathers smile as they watch vaccination teams put a mark on the front gate of each home, noting who has been immunized and who hasn't. For the parents, it's the return of a welcome tradition that assures their children are safe from at least one threat in dangerous post-invasion Iraq.
NEWS
October 14, 2003 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The nation's top scientists have confirmed the adage that everybody talks about the weather but nobody can do much about it - even though states, cities and utilities are spending millions of dollars trying. Attempts to make it rain by seeding clouds are increasing worldwide, with 66 efforts underway in America, mostly in the parched West, but there's no scientific evidence that it works, the National Academy of Sciences concluded yesterday. In 10 states and two dozen countries, meteorologists are seeding clouds, usually with silver iodide, in an effort to unleash more rain and snow.
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