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NEWS
December 24, 1986
I was misquoted in staff writer John Corr's Dec. 18 article, "To Joe Z being Polish is more than ethnicity. " At no time did I say that the "Z" in Zazyczny could also stand for zippy. The effort to save the Kosciuszko house went on from the late 1960s through the 1970s with the financial help of Edward Piszek and under the leadership of Henry Wyszynski, then president of the Polish American Congress in eastern Pennsylvania. The Polish American Congress and its more than 100 member organizations, along with chapters and divisions across the nation, joined to help establish the Kosciuszko house as a national memorial.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
Over opposition by the Goode administration and one Republican Councilman, a City Council committee yesterday approved $350,000 to help a Polish-American group meet its mortgage on an Old City office building and begin building a museum on its first floor. The group, the Polish American Cultural Center, purchased the building last year with a $2.1 million city-backed loan, which representatives of the group said they would repay through private fund-raising efforts. However, Michael Blichasz, the center's president, said that shortly after the loan was approved, members of the city Polish community argued that he should try to seek more government funds to retire it, rather than rely on donations.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there's one thing Stephanie Zawislak, Diane Hlywiak and Aimee Zakrzewski like, it's their seventh grade teachers at the St. Josaphat's Parish School in Manayunk. "All of them know exactly how to pronounce our last names - even on the first day of school," Hlywiak said. That's just one of the advantages of attending a school founded for students of Polish ancestry. The other advantage, of course, is the annual march in the Pulaski Day Parade in Philadelphia. The three 12-year-olds, along with dozens of their classmates, joined an estimated 20,000 other participants on a march from 18th Street and the Parkway to Independence Hall yesterday.
NEWS
June 19, 2011
In 1902, Polish immigrant Stephan Nowaczyk began publishing Gwiazda (meaning "Star" in Polish), which would become one of the longest-running Polish American newspapers in Philadelphia. Nowaczyk was born in Poznan, Poland, in 1869 and immigrated to the United States with his family in the 1870s. They settled in Port Richmond, a predominantly Polish section of Philadelphia. Like his father, Nowaczyk was trained as a printer. He purchased secondhand printing equipment from his employer in 1902 to begin publishing Gwiazda from his home.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Danuta Walesa cradled a bouquet of red roses with her left hand and grasped small Polish and American flags in her right. A few yards away, Barbara Kulikoski, a Polish-American who had traveled from New York for yesterday's ceremony, poked a large Solidarity banner into the air. "She (Walesa) is the first lady of our country," Kulikoski said, as she observed the ceremony that capped four days of Freedom Festival activities. Danuta Walesa was accepting the city's first Philadelphia Freedom Medal for her husband, Lech Walesa, founder of the Solidarity labor movement in Poland.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Walter Szmid, who committed his life to Polish-American community work, died Thursday. He was 80 and lived in Port Richmond. After the Nazi invasion of Poland in September 1939, Szmid was instrumental in forming the Committee for Relief of Poland, dedicated to raising funds and supporting the Polish underground. That followed his involvement in 1938 helping to establish the General Orlicz-Dresher Chapter of the Sea League in America for young adult Polish immigrants who needed help to get adjusted in the United States.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maryanna Struzinska Liszewski, 95, a leader in the city's Polish community who helped translate for immigrants, find scholarships for children, campaign for Polish-American politicians and honor the customs of her motherland, died Saturday at Germantown Hospital. Hard-working and independent, Mrs. Liszewski became a leader in the Polish community in the 1930s, when she took over as president of the Polish National Alliance, Lodge No. 2261, located near her Frankford home. During four decades of leadership, she also went on to become a regional director and a delegate to national conventions for the alliance, while also becoming active in the Polish American Congress and the Polish-American Citizen's League of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a "strong possibility" that Lech Walesa will visit Philadelphia sometime in November during the Polish labor leader's eight-day visit to the United States, a Polish-American leader said today. In addition to his trip to America, Walesa also may visit Moscow before the end of the year to meet Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, according to a Polish Solidarity leader. If Walesa does stop in Philadelphia, he will finally have the opportunity pick up the city's Freedom Medal that was presented to him in absentia in 1981 by former Mayor William Green.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | By Charles Pukanecz, Special to The Inquirer
Ed Jakubowicz's arms were sore from chopping the cabbage and stirring the 120 gallons of kapusta, or sauerkraut, he made during the first two days of the 28th Annual Polish American Festival. He took a break after filling his sixth 20-gallon crock with cabbage and salt and using a thick wooden mallet to crush the cabbage. "There's only one trick," said Jakubowicz, a second generation Polish American living in Levittown. "You have to get it mashed, so you break it up and let the juices out. Then you let the bacteria do the work and after two weeks you have the finished product.
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NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
They came to Camden decades ago for the American dream, and they refuse to leave. They are the Whitman Park stalwarts - elderly Polish immigrants living in one of the most dangerous and dilapidated neighborhoods in the city. But they remain Camden cheerleaders, held together by their church - St. Joseph's - and the spirit of the diverse residents who now populate a neighborhood once full of Polish bakeries, delicatessens, and other businesses that dominated the Mount Ephraim Avenue strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Enjoy fireworks and fountains and Longwood Gardens this weekend. On Saturday night at 8:15, watch Festive Fireworks set to the music of celebrated Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich - his Festival Overture and Jazz Suite No. 2. Also check out Festival of Fountains through Monday and see "Secrets of Victoria: Waterlily Queen" on view in the music room through Sept. 29.   Festive Fireworks, 8:15 p.m. Saturday at Longwood Gardens, 1001 Longwood Rd., Route 1 and Route 52, Kennett Square.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
String Bands Division Club Totals Club Points 1. Fralinger . . . 96.70 2. Quaker City . . . 96.10 3. Woodland . . . 94.60 4. South Philadelphia . . . 92.05 5. Ferko . . . 91.25 6. Hegerman . . . 91.10 6 tie. Avalon . . . 91.10 8. Aqua . . . 82.75 9. Polish American . . . 81.05 10. Uptown . . . 79.80 11. Pennsport . . . 75.90 12. Duffy . . . 73.35 13. Broomall . . . 72.85 14. Durning ....
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | BY FELICIA D'AMBROSIO, For the Daily News
FOR 47 YEARS, the Polish American Family Festival and Country Fair has been the main fundraiser keeping Our Lady of Czestochowa in Doylestown - sister church to the Monastery of Jasna Gora in Czestochowa, Poland - alive and welcoming pilgrims to the shrine. The volunteer-run, two-weekend event combines country fair standards such as carnival rides and games with cultural entertainment: performances of polka and modern Polish music and dance, traditional crafts, how-to demonstrations of favorites like kapusta (sauerkraut)
NEWS
June 19, 2011
In 1902, Polish immigrant Stephan Nowaczyk began publishing Gwiazda (meaning "Star" in Polish), which would become one of the longest-running Polish American newspapers in Philadelphia. Nowaczyk was born in Poznan, Poland, in 1869 and immigrated to the United States with his family in the 1870s. They settled in Port Richmond, a predominantly Polish section of Philadelphia. Like his father, Nowaczyk was trained as a printer. He purchased secondhand printing equipment from his employer in 1902 to begin publishing Gwiazda from his home.
NEWS
April 16, 2004
Minority recruitment In his April 11 commentary "Army drums rapping to hip-hop beat," Ed Morales echoes a tried and true argument from the liberal left that the military sends a higher percentage of minorities into combat. He uses outdated statistics from the Vietnam conflict. Morales claims that blacks and Latinos "consistently show participation and casualty rates higher than their proportion of the population. " According to the Long Way Home Project, a documentary film series which has conducted the most recent statistical research on the Vietnam conflict, 86.8 percent of the men killed as a result of hostile action were Caucasian and 12.1 percent were African American.
NEWS
July 19, 2002 | By Ira Porter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While their husbands, President Bush and Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski, spent the day shaking hands and giving speeches in Michigan, the wives visited Philadelphia doing the same. Laura Bush hosted Jolanta Kwasniewska, taking her on a tour of the Polish American Cultural Center, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the house at Third and Pine Streets that was home to Thaddeus Kosciuszko, a Polish-born military engineer who came to the United States in 1776 to help in the Revolutionary War. "Our countries, despite a different geography and history, share the same respect for freedom and liberty," Bush said.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There was one question the tour guide could not answer about the Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa: Of all places, how did it end up here? Built in the space-age style of the 1960s, the shrine is a boxy church whose 200-foot spire sticks the sky like a cross-tipped needle. It's a most holy site for Polish American Catholics, home to a consecrated version of the Black Madonna, a portrait of the Virgin Mary and Christ thought to be painted by St. Luke the Evangelist himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Andrzej Sitarz once talked with me about the role food played in carrying on Polish tradition, particularly at Easter. And I remember him stressing that one of those subtleties was that food be shared. Sitarz, originally from a small town near Lublin, and his wife, Jadwiga, from Warsaw, have been sharing their knowledge of food for 15 years - their anniversary was yesterday - at Syrenka, in the city's Port Richmond section, one of the few Polish restaurants in the region. Prior to the Sitarz, its name was Sabrina, and it was the center of what had been Philadelphia's Polish neighborhood.
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