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Political Advertising

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NEWS
November 16, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
There used to be liquor commercials on TV. Not only for beer or wine but genuine 86-proof, skull-popper hootch. Now, you don't see them. There used to be cigarette commercials on TV with macho guys and sexy women filling the air with smoke. They're gone, too. At the time the decisions to outlaw such commercials were made, there was a lot of wailing about how they infringed on free speech, private enterprise and freedom of choice. They didn't. Any American adult who chooses to can still drink or smoke himself into an early grave.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
TO AVOID HEADACHES over potentially offensive advertisements, SEPTA officials are set to further tighten advertising criteria. Today, the transit agency's board will consider requiring that advertisers be liable for any legal fees incurred from an advertisement. That includes lawsuits or "any adverse actions such as damage to our vehicles that could be caused by the ad," SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams said. The amendment on the table includes highly specific criteria like banning ads for the sale of tobacco or firearms.
NEWS
November 3, 2006 | By MARK R. HOROWITZ
THE MID-TERM campaigns have offered up perhaps the most venomous volleys of political advertising in U.S. history. Everything from race, sexual appetite, corruption and patriotism has been fodder for mudslinging and nastiness. And the many modes of transmitting the negative words and pictures, from broadcast and print to the Internet, ensure that Americans will be inundated with personal attacks on opponents right up to the election, day and night. Yet as Americans ponder how much of it is true and how much pure vindictive blather, we might note that we're rather backward compared to the pointed, frank and refreshingly honest political ads of the Romans more than 1,900 years ago. True, there were no TV sets or print ads. But the citizens were fairly literate and involved in daily life.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, a new kind of political ad is hitting the nation's television screens: ads featuring celebrity crime victims. President Clinton has issued two in the last week, and Rep. Dick Zimmer is using one in the vituperative U.S. Senate race in New Jersey. The Clinton ads feature Marc Klaas, the father of 12-year-old murder victim Polly Klaas, and James Brady, Ronald Reagan's former press secretary who was shot and paralyzed during the 1981 assassination attempt on Reagan.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Bereft of financial support from Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and other consumer giants avoiding this year's presidential conventions for fear that poisonous politics could taint their brands, the Democratic National Convention Committee is unveiling deals with tech firms it says will help reach voters later this month. On Monday, the Democrats said they will use Philadelphia-based Curalate to weed through social-media images and videos posted from the convention, and link them to cause-related websites for Democrats and favorite groups such as Planned Parenthood.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Bill Bradley is finding out that there is life after the Senate. He has been spending his days as a visiting professor at Stanford University, giving occasional lectures and traveling around the country. Those trips and his work as a guest commentator for CBS have furthered speculation about a possible presidential run in 2000. Yesterday, Bradley made his first high-profile appearance in Washington since stepping down from his seat as a senator from New Jersey in January 1997.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Maureen Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stick this one in the category of "with friends like these . . . " Some allegedly well-intentioned supporters recently rented a 20-by-40-foot billboard on the Black Horse Pike in Monroe Township that urged voters to re- elect Democrat Maggie Smith to the Gloucester County Board of Freeholders. Trouble was, they never told Smith. The star-studded, red, white and blue billboard irritated Smith's running mate, Monroe resident James Agnesino. His name was conspicuously absent.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | by Reginald K. Brack Jr., New York Times
Politics has always been a contact sport in America, but in the 1994 campaign, negative messages, groundless attacks on character, outright lying and distorted images dragged political advertising to a new low. The cutthroat ads followed a disturbing formula. In clipped, agitated tones, attack your opponent's character. Distort his record. Associate her with extremists. Work in a between-the-lines racist message. And by all means, steer clear of substance. Examples abound.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
On the same day voters cast ballots in South Carolina's presidential primary, a related but even more influential milestone will pass. Saturday is also the second anniversary of the Supreme Court's poisonous Citizens United decision, which allows billionaires, corporations, unions, and other special-interest groups to brazenly spend obscenely unlimited amounts on political advertising. The two-year-old decision turned back decades of campaign-finance reforms aimed at reducing the influence of elites over the government.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Second chances aren't guaranteed in life, but the U.S. Supreme Court is being given one to reverse its catastrophic decision allowing unfettered corporate political spending. All the court needs to do is take up a case involving an organization that's trying to undermine Montana's 100-year-old ban on direct corporate political giving. A century ago, Montana decided to break the choke hold that the "copper kings" who ran mining companies had over state government. It enacted a tough law prohibiting corporate financing of political campaigns.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Bereft of financial support from Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and other consumer giants avoiding this year's presidential conventions for fear that poisonous politics could taint their brands, the Democratic National Convention Committee is unveiling deals with tech firms it says will help reach voters later this month. On Monday, the Democrats said they will use Philadelphia-based Curalate to weed through social-media images and videos posted from the convention, and link them to cause-related websites for Democrats and favorite groups such as Planned Parenthood.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
The American Beverage Association poured $1.5 million into the fight against Mayor Kenney's proposed sugary-drinks tax during the month after the plan was introduced in early March, lobbying reports released Tuesday show. And that was before the association took its message to television. "We have and will continue to take the steps necessary to inform Philadelphians about the truth of this grocery-tax proposal," said Anthony Campisi, spokesman for the No Philly Grocery Tax Coalition, using the opposition's shorthand for Kenney's tax on sugary drinks.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Robert Maranto
By Robert Maranto In 2004, Donald Trump proclaimed, "I probably identify more as a Democrat. " Back then, his massive political donations went mainly to Democrats. He gave a lot to the Clintons. As National Public Radio reports, this New Yorker backed drug legalization, single-payer health care, and gun control. He shows little knowledge of his own religion and downright hostility to other faiths. He loves families so much he's had three wives. He opposes free trade and immigration, but imports hired help for his own businesses.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
TO AVOID HEADACHES over potentially offensive advertisements, SEPTA officials are set to further tighten advertising criteria. Today, the transit agency's board will consider requiring that advertisers be liable for any legal fees incurred from an advertisement. That includes lawsuits or "any adverse actions such as damage to our vehicles that could be caused by the ad," SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams said. The amendment on the table includes highly specific criteria like banning ads for the sale of tobacco or firearms.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colin Hanna , who runs the national conservative advocacy and fund-raising network Let Freedom Ring in West Chester, used to buy millions in ads on TV and news and political websites. But not this year. "We're doing it the opposite way: We're buying the audience," Hanna said. Hanna and his group are following voters from dozens of targeted social groups and tracking them by their online habits. Then they send the voters targeted ads, not visible to others, at hundreds of popular sites - Comcast's Infinity, MTV.com, Pandora, Yahoo , and magazine and game websites - says Hanna, a former Chester County commissioner.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Second chances aren't guaranteed in life, but the U.S. Supreme Court is being given one to reverse its catastrophic decision allowing unfettered corporate political spending. All the court needs to do is take up a case involving an organization that's trying to undermine Montana's 100-year-old ban on direct corporate political giving. A century ago, Montana decided to break the choke hold that the "copper kings" who ran mining companies had over state government. It enacted a tough law prohibiting corporate financing of political campaigns.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
The price for "pre-roll" political advertising — the short ads you have to watch before featured videos on Web news sites — has nearly doubled, to $45 to $50 per 1,000 online views, from about $25 six months ago, said Rick Masterson, cofounder of CampaignGrid L.L.C., the Fort Washington-based, Republican-oriented online advertising consultant. The new price is five times 2010 levels. Thank (or blame) the spread of Internet-by-smartphone, the social-media personal-data explosion, and especially the Supreme Court and its partisan Citizens United decision that eased campaign-spending limits, inflating political ads and rates.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Election seasons can serve as a reminder of just how deeply mysterious the human mind remains. Particularly puzzling is the fact that people are heavily influenced by political advertising on television. Our rational sides tell us that these ads are unlikely to serve as unbiased sources of information. And yet, in states where the bulk of negative ads focused on Mitt Romney's rivals, Romney won. In states where Rick Santorum or Newt Gingrich ran the most negative ads, they surged.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHARLESTON, S.C. - The biggest political rally of the primary season was hosted Friday by a fake Republican who is running for president even though he's not on the ballot and a real Republican who is not running for president even though he is on the ballot. And that pretty much tells you everything you need to know about how the masses - the cynical masses - view the American political system in the winter of 2012. Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert, a South Carolina native and one of the most influential American satirists of modern times, drew thousands to a 45-minute performance on the College of Charleston campus billed as the Rock Me Like a Herman Cain South Cain-Olina Primary Rally.
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHARLESTON, S.C. - The biggest political rally of the primary season was hosted Friday by a fake Republican who is running for president even though he's not on the ballot and a real Republican who is not running for president even though he is on the ballot. And that pretty much tells you everything you need to know about how the masses - the cynical masses - view the American political system in the winter of 2012. Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert, a South Carolina native and one of the most influential American satirists of modern times, drew thousands to a 45-minute performance on the College of Charleston campus billed as the Rock Me Like a Herman Cain South Cain-Olina Primary Rally.
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