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Political Asylum

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NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Kay Johnson, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - More Afghans fled the country and sought asylum abroad in 2011 than in any other year since the start of the decadelong war, suggesting that many are looking for their own exit strategy as international troops prepare to withdraw. From January to November, more than 30,000 Afghans applied for political asylum worldwide, a 25 percent increase over the same period the previous year and more than triple the level of just four years ago, according to U.N. statistics obtained by the Associated Press ahead of their scheduled publication later this year.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The continuing political unrest in the Soviet Union and now the overthrow of Mikhail Gorbachev have created a sense of urgency among three Soviet citizens visiting in Philadelphia. More than ever, they want to stay in the United States. Sunday's coup has helped change a once-in-a-lifetime visit to the U.S. into a desperate search for political asylum for the three Soviets who are currently staying on Malta Street near Van Kirk. "We had planned to stay only a few weeks," Stanislav Kushnirov said in a heavy Russian accent last night.
SPORTS
April 1, 1999 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Enkeleida Shkoza, a native of Albania who helped Temple capture its second straight Atlantic Ten volleyball championship last fall, is seeking political asylum in America. Shkoza's lawyer, Bill Stock, said that neither he nor his client would comment on the matter. "It's private," Stock said. It was not known when Shkoza initiated the process that, if successful, would allow her to remain in the United States, but her move preceded the NATO bombing campaign in Yugoslavia, which has sent thousands of ethnic Albanian refugees from Kosovo streaming into her homeland.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alexander Hamer, a former Pennsylvania deputy attorney general, was convicted yesterday by a Manhattan federal court jury of conspiring to file hundreds of false applications to federal authorities on behalf of immigrants seeking political asylum. Hamer, 46, of Berwyn, was convicted of conspiracy in connection with the hundreds of applications but acquitted of the substantive fraud charge. He was found guilty of fraud for making false statements in an unrelated application for asylum.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | BY LARS-ERIK NELSON
A door burst open at the First Congregational Church. Two immigration officers walked in, looking for America Sosa, a 49-year-old widow from El Salvador. They tried to slap handcuffs on her, but she went along quietly to a cell in northern Virginia under threat of deportation. Sosa is a widow because her husband, Joaquin, was abducted and beaten to death by El Salvadoran security forces in 1981. Two of her sons were imprisoned for opposing the government whose security forces have killed an estimated 70,000 civilians over the past eight years.
NEWS
November 1, 1996
The 104th Congress is history, most of its members now working hard back home to be part of the 105th Congress. That means boasting of their victories on bills dear to constituents' hearts and avoiding ques tions about bonehead bills they supported. Exhibit No. 1 in the latter cat egory . . . has to be the Immigration Responsibility Act of 1996. This laughably named law was supposed to be a corrective to the 1986 and 1990 "reforms," which opened the door to immigration abuse on an unprecedented scale.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. immigration officials in Philadelphia agreed yesterday to grant temporary asylum to a Haitian who fled his country in 1983, admitting that political freedoms had not improved in the two years since Haiti's dictator fled. "Haiti, by certainly any American standards, is not a country of free choices, and individuals even today are still subject to human-rights abuses," Immigration Judge John F. Gossart Jr. said in extending temporary political asylum to Jean Baptiste Pierre, 43, who had been a social activist in a Christian organization before fleeing Haiti.
NEWS
July 6, 1986
"Give me your tired, your poor," so they can be sent to a crowded detention center with minimal chance of gaining political asylum. This seems to be the message of a program operated by the administration to hold refugees while the courts decide their fates. From 1954 to 1981, nearly all immigrants of questionable status were released on parole, sometimes on bond, until the courts resolved their cases. Only those who seemed likely to flee or threaten national security were held.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
A Cuban family and the son of a Nicaraguan government employee found freedom unexpectedly when a disabled jet bound for Madrid made an emergency landing here. They stayed behind with only their carry-on luggage when the repaired Iberia Airlines DC-10 resumed its flight early yesterday. "In Cuba there is no freedom," Sergio Betancourt-Henriquez said through a translator. "It has always been a hope that we could live in the United States. " After the jet's safe emergency landing Tuesday night at Miami International Airport, the 238 passengers and crew waited in a lounge on the ground floor of the terminal.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | BY JUAN GONZALEZ
It is a fight virtually without sounds. Yes, you can just make out the rustling of pages in the federal register, that trusted artillery that our octopus of officialdom uses to discharge its edicts. And, yes, there are the faint, virtually impotent outcries of opponents who mute their anger in a shroud of legalese. But above the din of rockets and mines in The Gulf, or of bullets in the upteenth Coup of Manila, or of howls in the tug of War over Bork, this small bit of bureaucratic rulemaking has been lost to the ears of the American people.
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NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Thirty-five years after she broke out of a New Jersey prison, Joanne Chesimard is at the center of the debate over President Obama's move to reestablish relations with Cuba. Chesimard, who was convicted of fatally shooting a state trooper following a traffic stop on the New Jersey Turnpike in 1973, turned up in Cuba in the 1980s after escaping from a women's correctional facility where she was serving a life sentence. A Black Liberation Army member who now is known as Assata Shakur and is said to be the step-aunt and godmother of the slain rapper Tupac Shakur, Chesimard, now 67, is thought to be living in Cuba, according to the FBI, which put her on its Most Wanted Terrorists list in 2013.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden on Tuesday submitted a request for temporary asylum in Russia, his lawyer said, claiming he faces persecution from the U.S. government and could face torture or death. WikiLeaks, the secret-spilling site that has been advising Snowden, and Russia's Federal Migration Service both confirmed the application request. The service is required by law to consider the application within three months, but could do it faster. Snowden, who revealed details of a U.S. intelligence program to monitor Internet activity, argued in his application that the reason he needs asylum is "he faces persecution by the U.S. government and he fears for his life and safety, fears that he could be subjected to torture and capital punishment," lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said on Rossiya 24 television.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - Ecuador's embassy in London said Saturday that ambassador Anna Alban was traveling to her country's capital to brief President Rafael Correa on the bizarre request for political asylum made by Wikileaks chief Julian Assange. Assange took refuge inside the embassy on Tuesday and remains camped out in an office there after his legal options ran out for avoiding extradition from Britain to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning for alleged sex crimes. Correa, Ecuador's leftist president, has said his government is considering Assange's request, but has not indicated when a decision will be made.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Ecuador: Assange seeking asylum QUITO, Ecuador - Embattled WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange took refuge Tuesday in Ecuador's embassy in London and is seeking political asylum, the South American nation's foreign minister said. Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino said the government of President Rafael Correa was weighing the request. He did not indicate when a decision might be made. The move comes less than a week after Britain's Supreme Court rejected Assange's bid to reopen his attempts to block extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning after two women accused him of sexual misconduct during a visit to the country in mid-2010.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Kay Johnson, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - More Afghans fled the country and sought asylum abroad in 2011 than in any other year since the start of the decadelong war, suggesting that many are looking for their own exit strategy as international troops prepare to withdraw. From January to November, more than 30,000 Afghans applied for political asylum worldwide, a 25 percent increase over the same period the previous year and more than triple the level of just four years ago, according to U.N. statistics obtained by the Associated Press ahead of their scheduled publication later this year.
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is engaged in an intensive effort with embattled Yemeni strongman Ali Abdullah Saleh to find him a new home, preferably not in the United States, U.S. officials say, so that his violence-wracked homeland can proceed with a transition to democracy. President Obama's counterterrorism adviser, John Brennan, is leading the diplomatic effort, which appeared to gain steam this week when Saleh sought out U.S. Ambassador Gerald Feierstein in the capital, San'a, to discuss where he could go. The meeting was held shortly after Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called out Saleh for not living up to his commitments to leave Yemen and allow elections to end his 34-year dictatorship, the officials said Thursday.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mother was arrested and charged with stabbing her son and daughter to death in the city's Point Breeze section late Wednesday afternoon, police said. An 8-year-old boy and a 12-year-old girl were pronounced dead by medics at 5:25 inside a first-floor apartment in the 1700 block of South 18th Street, police said. Police took the mother, whose name was not released, to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for a psychiatric evaluation, said Chief Inspector Scott Small.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman who allegedly stabbed her 8-year-old son and 12-year-old daughter to death was released from a hospital this morning and turned over to police to face murder charges. Police identified her as Chanthy Mao, 27, a recent immigrant from Cambodia. Mao was taken to Police Headquarters this morning after undergoing a psychiatric evaluation at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She was ordered held without bail this afternoon at a preliminary hearing on two counts of murder in the slayings of her son Savann and daughter Savanna inside their home on the 1700 block of South 18th Street in South Philadelphia's Point Breeze section.
SPORTS
May 26, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
While wondering whether the Flyers can complete their improbable run, it's time to empty out the mailbag . . .   - Frank Frank, Agreed. Some fans get upset when people are late to the party or end up crashing the event. That sort of attitude ruins everyone's good time - including those who showed up early. The Flyers have treated the city to quite a bash, and it's not over yet. People should relax and enjoy the scene. (I think I saw Ed Snider in the other room with a plate of pigs in a blanket.
NEWS
November 1, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the day she died, Lisa Baird, an immigration lawyer, called an immigration officer. Though weak and woozy, she left a detailed message carefully spelling out her client's name. When her brother Jonathan protested that she shouldn't exert herself, she said: "You don't understand. If this guy gets deported, his life is over. " Ms. Baird, 56, of Mount Airy, died of breast cancer Oct. 21. at her mother's home in Wynnewood. "Lisa used her expertise to the great benefit of a marginalized and often despised group," said Jonathan Baird, also a lawyer.
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