CollectionsPolitical Contributions
IN THE NEWS

Political Contributions

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011 | By JULIE CARR SMYTH, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - The directors of media conglomerate News Corp., the owner of Fox News Channel, have quietly put in place a policy to disclose corporate political donations on the company's website. The decision was made April 12, according to a notice posted without fanfare by the company. A News Corp. spokeswoman declined telephone and email requests by the Associated Press to discuss the new policy. The policy calls for the company - which also owns 20th Century Fox movie studio and The Wall Street Journal - to disclose political contributions made between January and June on July 15. Annual postings would follow each January.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
How much money do public companies spend on politicians, and what do they disclose? An index offers a peek at the juicy details. For the first time, the 2015 CPA-Zicklin Index gives a breakdown of every company in the S&P 500: which policies each company maintains on political contributions; if the company even has a policy; and links to how much moolah it donates. The index, started in 2009, shows the largest publicly held U.S. companies' political activity in a high-spending era marked by an unprecedented flood of dark money, said Bruce Freed, president of the Center for Political Accountability in Washington, which partnered with the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania to create CPA-Zicklin.
NEWS
October 7, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday ruled unconstitutional a provision of the 51-year-old Philadelphia Home Rule Charter that prohibits firefighters from making political contributions. "When so many other public employees freely contribute to candidates and causes they support," wrote U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell, "we fail to see how the city can show that prohibiting uniformed Fire Department employees from making political contributions rationally relates to the preservation of public confidence in the city's government.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2010 federal law bars private money managers who invest state and local pension funds from making political contributions to state and local officials who hire private money managers. But wealthy hedge, buyout, and real estate investment magnates still can and do finance Congress members and national political committees closely tied to state and local politicians while also collecting fat fees from state and local pension funds. Last week, New Jersey and Philadelphia both acted on legislation that attempts to curb these conflicts of interest.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
If anybody should avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest, it should be members of the state Ethics Commission, right? Well, maybe. There's a debate going on about that right now in the Capitol, where regulations devised by members of the Ethics Commission to govern themselves are being opposed by some key lawmakers and the Independent Regulatory Review Commission (IRRC). The chief disagreement is over a provision that would bar not only Ethics Commission members but also members of the commissioners' immediate families who reside with them from participating in or contributing to a political campaign.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Redevelopment Authority has adopted rules that will force firms to compete over the agency's bond work. The change would require lawyers to disclose all political contributions. "The RDA continues to take a leadership role in making our city's government more accessible, transparent, fair and ethical," John J. Dougherty, chairman of the authority board, said in a statement released yesterday. Zachary Stalberg, president of the Committee of Seventy, said the new ethics standards at the authority were a good thing.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2005 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commerce Bancorp Inc. has offered to pay $600,000 for allegedly violating bond-industry rules restricting political contributions by firms that do business with states, cities and towns. The Cherry Hill bank's Commerce Capital Markets unit has signed a proposed letter of consent to settle alleged unspecified violations of Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board Rule G-37, according to a statement that Commerce filed yesterday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The NASD, formerly the National Association of Securities Dealers, which enforces the rule, has not announced any settlement.
NEWS
December 6, 2003 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commerce Bancorp, known for its extensive political ties, announced in a filing this week that it would suspend all political contributions while it evaluated the "reputation risks" of such activity. The suspension does not apply to individual Commerce employees, bank spokesman David Flaherty said. "We don't dictate what employees do," Flaherty said. In April, Commerce announced that it was suspending political contributions in New Jersey. The suspension now applies to federal candidates as well as campaigns in other states.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Casino Control Act makes it clear that Donald J. Trump and other gaming executives in town are prohibited from making political contributions in the state. Not so clear, regulators say, is what is meant when the act says any agent acting "on behalf of" casino operators and their executives is also banned from such political activity. The Casino Control Commission is going to attempt to clarify that, spurred on by a request from a longtime state senator who is up for reelection in November.
NEWS
May 1, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani, Angela Couloumbis and Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The state Supreme Court yesterday ruled that a blanket ban on political contributions by gaming interests was unconstitutional, striking down a key provision of Pennsylvania's 2004 law designed to keep corruption out of the fledgling slots industry. In a case involving a Blue Bell developer, the justices found that such a ban "clearly, palpably, and plainly" violated free-speech provisions. The ban restricts "a constitutionally protected form of expression that is no less legitimate or important than other forms of expression," Chief Justice Ronald Castille wrote on behalf of the 5-1 majority.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
How much money do public companies spend on politicians, and what do they disclose? An index offers a peek at the juicy details. For the first time, the 2015 CPA-Zicklin Index gives a breakdown of every company in the S&P 500: which policies each company maintains on political contributions; if the company even has a policy; and links to how much moolah it donates. The index, started in 2009, shows the largest publicly held U.S. companies' political activity in a high-spending era marked by an unprecedented flood of dark money, said Bruce Freed, president of the Center for Political Accountability in Washington, which partnered with the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania to create CPA-Zicklin.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
TODAY IS Super Tuesday, and, by day's end, we could know the respective presidential nominees from each major party. But for Philadelphians, that news pales in comparison with Mayor Kenney's intention to embark on a $600 million plan to remake the city's parks and recreation centers. All politics, after all, are local. And here's our local political reality. The largely white Electrical Workers Union and its equally white counterpart, the Carpenters Union, have dominated taxpayer-funded construction work for years.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Reading's former city council president was ordered Monday to serve two years in prison, becoming the first public official sentenced as part of a bribery investigation that has also implicated mayors in two Pennsylvania cities. Francisco Acosta, 40, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy in August, admitting that he accepted a $1,800 bribe meant to buy his support to repeal the city's anticorruption ordinance, which put caps on political contributions and barred government contractors from donating to campaigns.
NEWS
October 13, 2015
ISSUE | FORFEITURE LAW Drug dealers should not be protected Although State Rep. Jim Cox's legislation is well-intentioned and is not intended to hurt law enforcement, it would protect drug dealers and their illegally gotten profits ("Forfeiture law needs reform," Sept. 30). Under this bill, a drug dealer who becomes a fugitive keeps his illegal drug money. When a dealer dies before trial, the illegal money goes to his next of kin. When he thwarts a conviction by intimidating a witness, he keeps his drug money and property.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a supporter of City Councilman David Oh offered to give beyond what the city's campaign finance laws allowed to his reelection bid, Oh didn't turn the man away. Instead, the city's ethics board said Monday, Oh told him to give to another political committee, which then funneled the money to Oh's coffers. Oh, an at-large Republican councilman seeking reelection, agreed to give the city $4,600 of the excess contribution and pay a $2,000 fine. In an interview, Oh said the mistake was unintentional and that what he did was legal before campaign finance laws changed.
NEWS
April 18, 2015
A story Thursday on Pennsylvania Supreme Court races gave incorrect titles for candidates Anne Lazarus and David Wecht. They are Superior Court judges. The story also should have noted that Inquirer news staffers are represented collectively by the Newspaper Guild, a sector of the Communications Workers of America. While the CWA has made contributions in the race, the Guild does not have a political action committee and does not make political contributions.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
IF YOU CAN do a decent Michael Buffer impersonation, now might be a good time to bust out a hearty, "Let's get ready to rumble!" The reason: Three of the city's Democratic mayoral candidates threw some jabs at each other yesterday, making this mayor's race feel for the first time like a living, breathing competition. Former City Councilman Jim Kenney's campaign got things started by lambasting state Sen. Anthony Williams, who suggested Monday that the School District of Philadelphia should consider accepting a $25 million donation from the Philadelphia School Partnership, an education advocacy group.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - Mitchell Rubin, the onetime chairman of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, pleaded guilty Thursday to commercial bribery and will serve no jail time for his role in the pay-to-play scheme involving the agency. Rubin appeared in Dauphin County Court to enter a plea to one count of commercial bribery, a misdemeanor charge that carries a maximum penalty of two years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Under the terms of the plea deal with the state Attorney General's Office, Rubin will receive 24 months of probation, serve 100 hours of community service, and pay a $2,500 fine.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2010 federal law bars private money managers who invest state and local pension funds from making political contributions to state and local officials who hire private money managers. But wealthy hedge, buyout, and real estate investment magnates still can and do finance Congress members and national political committees closely tied to state and local politicians while also collecting fat fees from state and local pension funds. Last week, New Jersey and Philadelphia both acted on legislation that attempts to curb these conflicts of interest.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official cloak of secrecy on political contributions made by companies working for the Delaware River Port Authority may soon be a thing of the past. The DRPA's audit committee on Wednesday approved a proposal to restore public access to vendors' political contributions. The full DRPA board will vote on the proposal, made by Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, later this month. "It's just common sense," DePasquale said Wednesday. "The public has a right to know who's donating to me. " "The idea of not letting this stuff become public is just silly.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|