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Political Contributions

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011 | By JULIE CARR SMYTH, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - The directors of media conglomerate News Corp., the owner of Fox News Channel, have quietly put in place a policy to disclose corporate political donations on the company's website. The decision was made April 12, according to a notice posted without fanfare by the company. A News Corp. spokeswoman declined telephone and email requests by the Associated Press to discuss the new policy. The policy calls for the company - which also owns 20th Century Fox movie studio and The Wall Street Journal - to disclose political contributions made between January and June on July 15. Annual postings would follow each January.
NEWS
October 7, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday ruled unconstitutional a provision of the 51-year-old Philadelphia Home Rule Charter that prohibits firefighters from making political contributions. "When so many other public employees freely contribute to candidates and causes they support," wrote U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell, "we fail to see how the city can show that prohibiting uniformed Fire Department employees from making political contributions rationally relates to the preservation of public confidence in the city's government.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2010 federal law bars private money managers who invest state and local pension funds from making political contributions to state and local officials who hire private money managers. But wealthy hedge, buyout, and real estate investment magnates still can and do finance Congress members and national political committees closely tied to state and local politicians while also collecting fat fees from state and local pension funds. Last week, New Jersey and Philadelphia both acted on legislation that attempts to curb these conflicts of interest.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
If anybody should avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest, it should be members of the state Ethics Commission, right? Well, maybe. There's a debate going on about that right now in the Capitol, where regulations devised by members of the Ethics Commission to govern themselves are being opposed by some key lawmakers and the Independent Regulatory Review Commission (IRRC). The chief disagreement is over a provision that would bar not only Ethics Commission members but also members of the commissioners' immediate families who reside with them from participating in or contributing to a political campaign.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Redevelopment Authority has adopted rules that will force firms to compete over the agency's bond work. The change would require lawyers to disclose all political contributions. "The RDA continues to take a leadership role in making our city's government more accessible, transparent, fair and ethical," John J. Dougherty, chairman of the authority board, said in a statement released yesterday. Zachary Stalberg, president of the Committee of Seventy, said the new ethics standards at the authority were a good thing.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2005 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commerce Bancorp Inc. has offered to pay $600,000 for allegedly violating bond-industry rules restricting political contributions by firms that do business with states, cities and towns. The Cherry Hill bank's Commerce Capital Markets unit has signed a proposed letter of consent to settle alleged unspecified violations of Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board Rule G-37, according to a statement that Commerce filed yesterday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The NASD, formerly the National Association of Securities Dealers, which enforces the rule, has not announced any settlement.
NEWS
December 6, 2003 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commerce Bancorp, known for its extensive political ties, announced in a filing this week that it would suspend all political contributions while it evaluated the "reputation risks" of such activity. The suspension does not apply to individual Commerce employees, bank spokesman David Flaherty said. "We don't dictate what employees do," Flaherty said. In April, Commerce announced that it was suspending political contributions in New Jersey. The suspension now applies to federal candidates as well as campaigns in other states.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Casino Control Act makes it clear that Donald J. Trump and other gaming executives in town are prohibited from making political contributions in the state. Not so clear, regulators say, is what is meant when the act says any agent acting "on behalf of" casino operators and their executives is also banned from such political activity. The Casino Control Commission is going to attempt to clarify that, spurred on by a request from a longtime state senator who is up for reelection in November.
NEWS
May 1, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani, Angela Couloumbis and Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The state Supreme Court yesterday ruled that a blanket ban on political contributions by gaming interests was unconstitutional, striking down a key provision of Pennsylvania's 2004 law designed to keep corruption out of the fledgling slots industry. In a case involving a Blue Bell developer, the justices found that such a ban "clearly, palpably, and plainly" violated free-speech provisions. The ban restricts "a constitutionally protected form of expression that is no less legitimate or important than other forms of expression," Chief Justice Ronald Castille wrote on behalf of the 5-1 majority.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Frank Greve and Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A maritime union saw President Clinton scuttle a proposal that would have hurt the maritime industry. A casino-dependent Indian tribe heard the President endorse the right of Indians to run their own gaming operations. America's leading ethanol producer secured a big new market through a revised regulation. Brewers and America's biggest winery ducked sin taxes once considered by the White House to pay for health-care reform. Their link? Each gave $100,000 or more to the Democratic National Committee.
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NEWS
April 18, 2015
A story Thursday on Pennsylvania Supreme Court races gave incorrect titles for candidates Anne Lazarus and David Wecht. They are Superior Court judges. The story also should have noted that Inquirer news staffers are represented collectively by the Newspaper Guild, a sector of the Communications Workers of America. While the CWA has made contributions in the race, the Guild does not have a political action committee and does not make political contributions.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
IF YOU CAN do a decent Michael Buffer impersonation, now might be a good time to bust out a hearty, "Let's get ready to rumble!" The reason: Three of the city's Democratic mayoral candidates threw some jabs at each other yesterday, making this mayor's race feel for the first time like a living, breathing competition. Former City Councilman Jim Kenney's campaign got things started by lambasting state Sen. Anthony Williams, who suggested Monday that the School District of Philadelphia should consider accepting a $25 million donation from the Philadelphia School Partnership, an education advocacy group.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - Mitchell Rubin, the onetime chairman of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, pleaded guilty Thursday to commercial bribery and will serve no jail time for his role in the pay-to-play scheme involving the agency. Rubin appeared in Dauphin County Court to enter a plea to one count of commercial bribery, a misdemeanor charge that carries a maximum penalty of two years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Under the terms of the plea deal with the state Attorney General's Office, Rubin will receive 24 months of probation, serve 100 hours of community service, and pay a $2,500 fine.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2010 federal law bars private money managers who invest state and local pension funds from making political contributions to state and local officials who hire private money managers. But wealthy hedge, buyout, and real estate investment magnates still can and do finance Congress members and national political committees closely tied to state and local politicians while also collecting fat fees from state and local pension funds. Last week, New Jersey and Philadelphia both acted on legislation that attempts to curb these conflicts of interest.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official cloak of secrecy on political contributions made by companies working for the Delaware River Port Authority may soon be a thing of the past. The DRPA's audit committee on Wednesday approved a proposal to restore public access to vendors' political contributions. The full DRPA board will vote on the proposal, made by Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, later this month. "It's just common sense," DePasquale said Wednesday. "The public has a right to know who's donating to me. " "The idea of not letting this stuff become public is just silly.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Mark Fazlollah, and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
A longtime aide and political adviser to U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) pleaded guilty Wednesday to concealing the misuse of $622,000 in campaign contributions and federal grant funds, in a case that appears to have led investigators straight to the congressman's door. Gregory Naylor, 66, admitted that he conspired with his boss - identified in court filings only as "Elected Official A" - to pay off a series of debts, including an unreported $1 million campaign donation, with grant funds and political contributions funneled through a series of nonprofits and consulting firms.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's 95-year ban on political contributions by police officers has been overturned by a federal appeals court, which found that the prohibition violated the officers' First Amendment rights. The ruling Monday by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit came in response to an appeal by the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, which argued that the ban emasculated the union politically by greatly reducing the funds available to its political action committee, known as COPPAC.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lead prosecutor in the looming corruption and bribery trial of former top turnpike officials and vendors - a signature case for the office of Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane - plans to leave her position ahead of trial. Senior Deputy Attorney General Laurel Brandstetter is expected to handle pretrial arguments in hearing next week, but then depart from the Attorney's General's Office Aug. 29, according to people familiar with her plans. The Attorney General's Office declined to comment on the reports of Brandstetter's resignation.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The secrecy surrounding political contributions made by companies working for the Delaware River Port Authority may soon be lifted. The DRPA's audit committee on Wednesday reviewed a proposal to restore public access to vendors' political contributions. The proposal, by Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, will get another hearing by the audit committee next month. If approved by the panel, it will be sent to the full DRPA board for a vote. Under the DRPA's current rules, adopted in November 2012, contractors doing or seeking business with DRPA must disclose to the agency any political contributions made in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
A LIBERAL political group yesterday accused a billionaire casino investor of making an illegal campaign contribution to Gov. Corbett. Keystone Progress filed a complaint with the state Gaming Control Board against Sheldon Adelson, a Republican mega-donor and CEO of the Las Vegas Sands Corp. The group claims that an Adelson contribution of nearly $1 million ended up in Corbett's campaign account, in violation of the state gaming law's prohibition of casino owners giving political contributions in Pennsylvania.
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