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NEWS
October 29, 1992 | By Gail Gibson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a mock convention where fifth graders acted as delegates and ninth graders as presidential candidates, there was a lot of talk about the future: A future in which Friday's participants will be old enough to vote. A future in which the changes talked about so much in this year's campaigns will have trickled down to affect these students as they start trying to find jobs or secure college loans. A future in which convention halls are larger than the Oak Park Elementary gymnasium in Lansdale and delegates don't bring bologna sandwiches to snack on between speeches.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | By E. J. DIONNE JR
The big deal is not that Democrats shoved their politicians off center stage on their convention's first night and replaced them with nonpoliticians. The real news is that the nonpols, actor Christopher Reeve, and Jim and Sarah Brady, delivered what will stand as among the most pointed political messages of this convention. They neither fuzzed up the issues nor shrank from their main points. Reeve, paralyzed in a horse-riding accident last year, spoke slowly but resonantly.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
We always knew we could throw a party. But at the Presidents' Summit for America's Future two weeks ago, Philadelphia hosted presidents and ex-presidents, untold numbers of mayors, governors, and senators, along with thousands of delegates and newspeople. They had to be moved all over town from party to meeting to ceremony to neighborhood cleanup. There was a mix of show-biz, serious meetings, indoor and outdoor pomp, all with lots of suited security. Kind of reminds you of a dress rehearsal for - dare we say it - a national political convention?
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | By Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has been off the city payroll for less than a week, but former mayoral chief of staff David L. Cohen already has accepted a new job from his old boss - that of co-chairing an effort to bag one of the major political parties' conventions in 2000. Mayor Rendell announced yesterday that he had picked Cohen and Brian Roberts, the 37-year-old president of Comcast Corp., to co-chair the nonprofit Philadelphia 2000. Cohen was the mayor's most trusted aide until he resigned last week to run his old law firm, Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll.
NEWS
May 26, 1998
As a wagering proposition, Philadelphia's bid for a political convention in 2000 may be a long shot: Too few electoral votes in play. Too little sun-splashed glamour. Too long (50 years) since it hosted a major-party convention. Now that the obligatory Philly self-deprecation is out of the way, let's look at the good stuff. A full-court press by city, state and civic leaders is shortening the odds. Call it Philadelphia's effort to redefine the "conventional" wisdom. It will flower over the next few weeks, as the city's power to please is put on display for the Republican and Democratic site-selection teams.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
"Look at that headline," Fred Sainz says with pride. It's from the New Hampshire Sunday News. It reads, "San Diego Has Much to Offer. " "That's the kind of coverage a national political convention gets you. " Sainz, a deputy mayor in San Diego, is flipping through an oversize book of newspaper clippings, half an inch thick and bulging with superlatives, published in papers across America during the week of the 1996 Republican convention....
BUSINESS
February 10, 2000 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia spent just over a million dollars in its campaign to bring a national political convention to the city, according to tax records filed with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Records filed by Philadelphia 2000, the local convention host committee, show that $1.06 million was spent in 1998 to "attract the next Democratic or Republican national convention to be held in 2000. " The group spent $111,261 in 1997. The records said that Philadelphia 2000 used the money for "meetings with executives from both parties," for "travel to party caucus sites to determine each party's needs and wants," and "to showcase the city of Philadelphia and surrounding region and facilities to the Democratic and Republican site-selection committee.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the nation's second-largest city hosts the Democratic National Convention in August, television cameras from across the world will focus on this sprawling metropolis, just two weeks after zooming in on the Republicans in Philadelphia. But when Democrats try to woo American voters from this 470-square-mile expanse of freeways, mini-malls and beaches, they won't have the luxury of such patriotic props as Independence Hall or the Liberty Bell. Instead, convention organizers want to send a different message: one of diversity.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ed Rendell was dancing with Mark Segal, one of the leading voices in the gay community, at Woody's Bar & Restaurant in Center City last month when the mayor popped the question: Would Segal make a contribution to a forthcoming Democratic fund-raiser? The occasion was a party for the Democratic National Committee, in town last month to scout Philadelphia as a possible site for the party's presidential nominating convention in 2000. Segal was host. Rendell made an appearance and used his playful dance with the publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News as yet another opportunity to seek out a donation for the DNC fund-raiser.
NEWS
November 6, 1998
Philadelphia Republican no longer sounds like a contradiction in terms. Two years from now thousands of GOP faithful will converge on the city - the result of yesterday's exciting and, yes, stunning announcement that the 2000 Republican National Convention is headed here. The party of Lincoln, long in remission in City Hall, will make a roaring six-day comeback. And that should be just fine with this old Democratic town. Winning this prize, pursued doggedly by Mayor Rendell, with the help of Gov. Ridge and other political and business leaders, will be worth millions of dollars in business for the city.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2012
By Dusty Nix Brace for the fire and brimstone, Democrats. You didn't invite the Big Guy to your party in Charlotte. Sodom and Gomorrah were a carnival compared to what you're in for. No need for a recap of the whole silly flap over the Dems' decision to remove the word God from their platform statement, then put it back in. But you can say this for the Democrats: They're consistent in their stunning political tone-deafness. From a purely practical standpoint, not invoking the name of the Almighty is a nonissue.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Voters, those with proper ID and otherwise, did you know that there are U.S. Senate races in our region this year? True, in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, even adorable Delaware. Understandably, you may be distracted by the presidential campaign. You may be wondering why, during the dog days of summer, the political parties decided to hold their national conventions in the charmless sweatboxes of Charlotte and Tampa. Not so long ago, potentates chose these quadrennial locations with their stomachs, opting for such gustatory playgrounds as San Francisco and New Orleans where, if you ask me, conventions should be held in perpetuity.
NEWS
August 22, 2004 | By Max Boot
Max Boot is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations Bush supporters are furious that some liberals have the temerity to accuse the President of misusing terrorism alerts for political purposes. Kerry supporters are equally steamed that some conservatives are questioning whether Kerry really performed all those heroic acts in Vietnam. Charges of negative campaigning fill the air like confetti at a political convention. Much of this, of course, is nakedly self-serving.
NEWS
July 26, 2004 | By Martin Merzer INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
Jet fighters thundered and helicopters thumped over the convention center yesterday. Sand-filled dump trucks blocked most approaches. Black-uniformed state officers and camouflage-uniformed military police clutched automatic weapons. At one point, three guards and two bomb-sniffing dogs sat in the otherwise empty Louisiana section of the FleetCenter. The dogs' names? "Can't tell you," an officer replied. "We're trying to keep the dogs on a low profile. " This is what it's come to as the Democratic Party prepares to open its four-day convention today inside fortresses encircled by eight-foot-high black iron fences.
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Worried that terrorists have been emboldened by the recent train bombings in Spain, Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge warned yesterday of possible strikes against Americans at coming events, from the debut of the World War II Memorial to the national political conventions. "With so many symbolic gatherings in the next few months, we must be aggressive," Ridge told radio and television broadcasters in Las Vegas. Other "targets of opportunity" that terrorists might be eyeing, Ridge said, are the Summer Olympics in Athens, the U.S. presidential election, the International Monetary Fund meeting in Washington, the June economic summit of wealthy nations in Sea Island, Ga., the July 4 holiday, and the 2005 presidential inauguration.
NEWS
January 18, 2003 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Now appearing at the Convention Center for an extended run: smash-mouth mayoral politics. Republican candidate Sam Katz floated a proposal for the troubled building earlier in the week, with a twist. He said Democratic City Councilman Michael Nutter - one of Mayor Street's harshest critics - should become chairman of the Convention Center's board. Reacting quickly, Street vowed a suit to overturn the state law that recently seized control of the center from the city. Then, two trade unions allied with the mayor said they would pull out of an agreement aimed at ending the labor disputes there.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2002 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the close of the Republican convention in 2000, Mayor Street exuberantly vowed that the city would bid for the Democrats' convention in 2004. But with a crucial Democratic deadline weeks away, city leaders have yet to decide whether the region wants to assemble enough players to orchestrate another political convention. "It's the mayor's call," said David L. Cohen, a politically connected city lawyer who helped direct the region's effort to land and manage the 2000 Republican National Convention.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2001 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last summer, a jubilant Mayor Street, buoyed by the city's success in hosting the Republican presidential convention, vowed that he'd bring the Democrats to town in 2004. "The moment it's over," Street told the Philadelphia Daily News, "we're going to start gearing up to go for the Democratic convention four years from now. " So far, that convention drive hasn't gotten out of neutral. This summer, while other cities - most of them past convention bidders - are already clamoring to put their names in the running for both 2004 political conventions, Philadelphia's voice is nowhere to be heard.
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You could see from a block away that something big was happening at the Grand Hyatt Hotel. A police car flashed its lights on the corner. Stretch limousines and SUVs poked their noses into the drop-off area, which was aglow with light. An excited crowd, held in check by yellow plastic tape, strained for a look at disembarking celebrities. "I saw Mike Tyson; I saw Mike Tyson," squealed Shonda Pender, 29, who, with her 6-year-old son, Shaunbrdrk, had squeezed to the front. Only marginally impressed with the former heavyweight champ, the boy was watching for a bigger star in his mind - a wrestler.
NEWS
December 31, 2000
CONVENTION LEAVES PHILA. LOOKING GOOD, MOSTLY When Edward G. Rendell returned from the Democratic National Convention in Chicago 1996, the mayor wanted to give Philadelphia the same chance to shine. He put his sidekick, David L. Cohen, on the case and appointed Karen Dougherty Buchholz, a top-notch saleswoman, to make a strong pitch for a political convention. Either party would do. As usual, no one thought Philadelphia had a chance. But an aggressive, thorough and well-researched sales effort combined with state-of-the-art facilities at the First Union Center and a major hotel-building program to bring the Republicans to Philadelphia.
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