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NEWS
August 19, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
Ronnie Polaneczky talks about a port authority board member, with a 180k salary, who gave his daughter an easy pass across bridges. A political culture in which leadership keeps sticking their hands in the public cookie jar, Page 2 - Story Page 6
NEWS
November 3, 2002 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania has never had a woman governor, but after the polls close Tuesday night it is certain to be one step closer. Both major political parties nominated women for lieutenant governor this year. That means that either former State Treasurer Catherine Baker Knoll, the Democrat, or Republican State Sen. Jane Earll will be one heartbeat away from the governor's residence. Experts say Pennsylvania has not had a woman governor for many of the reasons most states have not: a thin "bench" of women in lesser political jobs that are stepping-stones to the office; few women in business leadership; and political parties controlled by men. State legislatures are common training grounds for future governors, and just 14.2 percent of the members of the Pennsylvania House and Senate are women, according to a survey last year by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.
NEWS
April 13, 2005
The field is where the players belong. Let the boxes belong to the people. Unfortunately, under Mayor Street, the city's boxes, or luxury suites, at the two new stadiums in South Philadelphia have become the province of Philadelphia's "players". "Players" - as in political honchos, campaign cash rainmakers, union bosses, and Democratic Party hacks. An analysis by Inquirer staff writer Marcia Gelbart found that 95 percent of the tickets for the city's boxes at Lincoln Financial Field and Citizens Bank Park in 2003 and 2004 went to people in the "player" category.
NEWS
February 2, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was almost like the idle wish of someone on the way to Traffic Court to face yet another $30-a-month levy on top of existing now-to-eternity payment plans: What if, just for today, all of the judges got arrested? Indeed, on a day when nine current or former judges were appearing before judges, most courtrooms were empty in the Traffic Court building at Eighth and Spring Garden Streets. "We're down a fair number of judges due to suspensions, retirements, and indictments," said Administrative Judge Gary S. Glazer, brought in a year ago to change the culture at the now-hobbled Traffic Court.
NEWS
January 13, 2006 | By Harry Pozycki
As a new governor prepares to take office, New Jersey has begun to make progress in combating the political corruption that wastes tax dollars, distorts our politics, and hurts our state's image. New Jersey now has significant pay-to-play protections on the state level - protections that reduce the link between political contributions and lucrative state contracts. Further, a law giving municipalities and counties clear and broad enabling authority to continue to adopt their own strong pay-to-play reforms cleared the Legislature, and Gov. Codey signed it this week.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
It was refreshing to see primary voters in two Philadelphia legislative districts say no to politics as usual by rejecting an old-guard Democratic House member and turning away a newcomer who pinned her hopes on being the namesake daughter of the man who had held that office. The apparent defeat in the 182d District of State Rep. Babette Josephs, 71, not only paves the way for the election of Pennsylvania's first openly gay state lawmaker, but also served as savvy Center City voters' rejection of unsavory — not to mention silly — campaign tactics.
NEWS
December 19, 1995
So Bennett Levin's excellent adventure comes to an end at the city's always-exciting Department of Licenses and Inspections. He departs the commissioner's post in a snarling match with the mayor's office over perceived slights that he has recorded in a four-inch-thick binder, but with Mayor Rendell's public tribute still ringing in his ears. L&I reaches out and touches people where they live in Philadelphia - merchants who want to put up new signs, rowhouse dwellers who want to build decks, neighborhoods that want something done about vacant houses or slumlords.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
Here's the key question in the so-called race for Pennsylvania's First Senate District, a territory also known as FumoWorld: Why is it a contest in name only? Why is it that, term after term in Philadelphia, no serious people with impressive credentials ever challenge an incumbent as deeply flawed as Democratic State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo? The Editorial Board cannot in good conscience endorse him again, though it did in the May primary. Since then, Fumo has shown zero remorse over publicized dealings that law enforcement authorities are scrutinizing.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | Freelance
Five men are arrested at 2:30 in the morning trying to break into a sixth-floor office suite. The initial Washington Post story says there was "no immediate explanation as to why the five suspects would want to bug the Democratic National Committee offices or whether or not they were working for any other individuals or organizations. " The White House press secretary describes it as "a third-rate burglary. "   Forty years ago today, the greatest political scandal of the 20th century began to unfold, an episode that would change American politics, transform the way journalism is practiced, alter the relationship between government and the public around the globe, and reshape the English language.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WANTED: AN AMERICAN STATESMAN. Bipartisan credentials required, to mediate serious dispute between two warring camps. Must be willing to travel, and to seek compromise solutions in the national interest. The job has been open for the last 11 days. Amid all the partisan strife that is marring the struggle for supremacy between Al Gore and George W. Bush, there isn't a single dispassionate player on the horizon who qualifies as a Wise Man (an old Washington term), someone who could play shuttle diplomacy between the camps, lance the wounds, and speak for the good of the country.
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NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It may not surprise many people in Philadelphia-area politics that Zack Stalberg is leaving the helm of the Committee of Seventy to live out a Western fantasy. The 67-year-old former newspaper editor who took over the nonprofit watchdog group in 2005 has been a kind of ethics sheriff ever since. Stalberg announced Tuesday that he would step down as chief executive of the Committee of Seventy later this month. It is his second retirement and likely not his last. He and his wife are moving to New Mexico, where Stalberg hopes to ride horses and land a non-government-related job. "I want to do something that's different, that gets me outdoors," the former editor of the Philadelphia Daily News said Thursday.
NEWS
February 2, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was almost like the idle wish of someone on the way to Traffic Court to face yet another $30-a-month levy on top of existing now-to-eternity payment plans: What if, just for today, all of the judges got arrested? Indeed, on a day when nine current or former judges were appearing before judges, most courtrooms were empty in the Traffic Court building at Eighth and Spring Garden Streets. "We're down a fair number of judges due to suspensions, retirements, and indictments," said Administrative Judge Gary S. Glazer, brought in a year ago to change the culture at the now-hobbled Traffic Court.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
By Neal Gabler As we edged closer to the "fiscal cliff," some observers said we should take a page from Steven Spielberg's Lincoln . The film tells the story of how the president managed to steer the 13th Amendment - which outlawed slavery, finishing what was started by the Emancipation Proclamation 150 years ago today - through an inhospitable House of Representatives. On one side were Democrats who opposed outlawing slavery on the grounds that it would confer an equality that blacks should not have.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
As you wake up this morning and open your Sunday paper - or, more likely, check your mobile phone for news updates - rest assured that your city is in good hands. One hundred miles up the turnpike, your elected officials, business leaders, lobbyists, enablers, and media mavens are waking, bleary-eyed, after the weekend party-a-thon that is Pennsylvania Society. It's been going on since 1899, this swanky soiree of our state's power elite, in which the same few hundred usual suspects shuttle from one Waldorf-Astoria ballroom to another, from the Cozen O'Connor to the Duane Morris parties.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Larry Platt, For The Inquirer
It seems as if we just had a mayoral election, but that hasn't stopped the band of usual suspects — the lawyers, lobbyists, union bosses, and political hacks who run this town — from beginning to buzz about the 2015 race. They're up to their usual machinations, discussing who's in, who's out, who's a pretender, and how the black vote will split among the assortment of presumed black candidates. We've seen this movie before. If this crowd were as passionate about governing as it is about seizing power, maybe Philadelphia wouldn't be the most violent, least educated, and highly taxed big city in America.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | Freelance
Five men are arrested at 2:30 in the morning trying to break into a sixth-floor office suite. The initial Washington Post story says there was "no immediate explanation as to why the five suspects would want to bug the Democratic National Committee offices or whether or not they were working for any other individuals or organizations. " The White House press secretary describes it as "a third-rate burglary. "   Forty years ago today, the greatest political scandal of the 20th century began to unfold, an episode that would change American politics, transform the way journalism is practiced, alter the relationship between government and the public around the globe, and reshape the English language.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
It was refreshing to see primary voters in two Philadelphia legislative districts say no to politics as usual by rejecting an old-guard Democratic House member and turning away a newcomer who pinned her hopes on being the namesake daughter of the man who had held that office. The apparent defeat in the 182d District of State Rep. Babette Josephs, 71, not only paves the way for the election of Pennsylvania's first openly gay state lawmaker, but also served as savvy Center City voters' rejection of unsavory — not to mention silly — campaign tactics.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Earlier this year, Trenton-based Republican consultant Rich Ambrosino's phone started ringing off the hook. It had just become public that one of New Jersey's most powerful political figures, George E. Norcross III, was part of an investor group looking to buy Philadelphia Media Network, the parent company of The Inquirer, and other politicians were worried, Ambrosino said. "The political culture being what it is, there's always going to be Republicans saying, 'He's doing it to influence public policy outcomes,' " he said.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
JEROME J. SHESTACK was a prominent Philadelphia lawyer, a former president of the American Bar Association, a mover and shaker in law, politics and culture. But he might like to be remembered chiefly for his record on human rights. Shestack, who died yesterday at age 86, was appalled by the violence that people heap upon each other in the world, sometimes seeing it with his own eyes, and ached to do something about it. As chairman of the International League for Human Rights and the U.S. representative on the United Nations Human Rights Council, Shestack often gave voice to his feelings.
NEWS
March 27, 2011
HARRISBURG - Behind the mahogany doors of a state Capitol meeting room, witnesses wilted under an inquisition about the massive federal health-care law. "Can you explain to us in further detail how [the law] imposes a financial and administrative burden on the states?" Rep. Joe Pitts (R., Pa.), chairman of a U.S. House subcommittee, asked state Acting Insurance Commissioner Michael F. Consedine. What he meant was: Just how awful is Obamacare? Democratic protesters and labor activists outside the room Wednesday were chanting "We won't go back!"
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