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NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
So much for the idea that geography is destiny. The old ironclad rule that a political ticket ought to look like a Triptik for a party that travels north to south, east to west, was just torn into as many pieces as a used airline stub. When Bill Clinton picked Al Gore for the second spot, he barely stretched from one Southern state to another. Not a lot of frequent-flier miles from Hope, Ark., to Carthage, Tenn. By the traditional political map, the Tennarkana ticket looks lopsided.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like it or not, thousands of voters in the suburbs will almost certainly be represented in Congress soon by Philadelphia politicians. That change looms as political cartographers overhaul Philadelphia's political map - along with the rest of Pennsylvania's - to reflect the 1990 census. The changes could be sweeping, particularly in former U.S. Rep. William H. Gray 3d's old terrain, the sprawling Second Congressional District, which could see its black population fall from 82 percent to about 67 percent.
NEWS
February 5, 2004 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since the commissioners redrew the boundaries of Haverford Township's wards, Gary Bogossian has been living on the wrong side of the street. Now, the aspiring politician has joined a chorus that accuses five Republican commissioners of strategically cutting them out of their voting districts for crass political purposes. "They want to get anybody out - Democrat, independent or Republican - who's not toeing their line," said Bogossian, an independent who said he planned to run against incumbent Sixth Ward Republican George Twardy in 2005.
NEWS
October 23, 1991
No doubt about it, Mayor Goode and a handful of out-of-power City Council members grabbed the attention of Council's powerbrokers last week. They scuttled a proposed political map that failed to accommodate the vast growth of Philadelphia's Latino population. But there was an added twist: As long as Council members dally over drawing new boundaries for the 10 district seats, they won't be able to draw their pay. Obviously, this will focus the minds of many on Council. The question is, upon what?
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | By MORTIMER SELLERS
Nothing is stranger than a frankly gerrymandered political map - or uglier than blatant political corruption. Pennsylvanians are facing both in the final reapportionment plan filed by the Legislative Reapportionment Commission on Nov. 15. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has an opportunity to correct the gerrymander when it comes before the court this month. The justices should exercise their judicial power to bring Pennsylvania's new legislative districts to conformity with the U.S. and Pennsylvania Constitutions.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Rather than find a compromise, Democrats and Republicans spent yesterday castigating one another's congressional reapportionment plans, a week after the legislature was supposed to complete the once-a-decade job. House Democrats took little time to denounce the political map approved Monday by the Republican-controlled Senate. That proposal, which passed 26-24 along strict party lines, would achieve the necessary reduction of two congressional seats by eliminating the district of retiring U.S. Rep. Gus Yatron, a Berks County Democrat, and by merging the districts of U.S. Reps.
NEWS
December 22, 2001
The last thing Philadelphia needs for Christmas is for the chill between Mayor Street and City Council to deepen. That's just one of several good reasons for the mayor to sign, not veto, the Council redistricting plan on his desk. Until the plan is approved, Council members don't get paid. They haven't been since Oct. 1 - as the City Charter demands. But sympathy for pols with bills to pay isn't the main reason the mayor should sign. For one thing, the plan passed 15-2, after it was adjusted to meet most of the mayor's objections, so a veto would be hard to sustain.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By Emily Tartanella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Throughout Europe and the Middle East, Mira Awad is a celebrated entertainer. But when she's in the home of fellow singer Achinoam Nini, who goes by the stage name Noa, she's a musical partner and a friend. And Mira, 34, who is an Israeli Arab, and Noa, 40, who is an Israeli Jew, make a statement about unity every time they appear together onstage. Though they're highly acclaimed in their home country, representing Israel at the 2009 Eurovision song contest in Moscow, they are only now about to embark on their first American tour.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Joel Greenberg, Washington Post
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu emerged weakened and facing a redrawn political map Tuesday after Israeli television projections showed a surge for a new centrist party, Yesh Atid, in Israel's elections, making it a key element of a future coalition. Netanyahu's ticket combining his rightist Likud party with the ultranationalist Yisrael Beiteinu faction won 31 parliamentary seats, according to the projections, a sharp decline from the combined 42 seats held by the two parties in the outgoing 120-member legislature.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
More than 86,600 Philadelphians left town one way or another between 1990 and 1995, according to mid-decade census figures. City planners and the U.S. Census Bureau don't know who these people are or why they left. But politicians know exactly what it will mean if it keeps up until the year 2000. It means the city could lose a congressional seat, a couple of state representative seats and possibly one state senate seat. For city-dwellers, it means a loss of clout in Harrisburg and Washington.
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NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey Democrats are moving to change the process by which the state's legislative districts are drawn, advancing a bill that would put the high-stakes political issue to voters through a constitutional amendment. Their plan, opposed vociferously by Republicans, would change the composition of the Apportionment Commission and use data from all statewide general elections - for governor, U.S. Senate, and president - held in the previous decade to draw the political map. The wonky, math-intensive matter of redistricting helps shape the balance of power in Trenton and in statehouses across the country.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Joel Greenberg, Washington Post
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu emerged weakened and facing a redrawn political map Tuesday after Israeli television projections showed a surge for a new centrist party, Yesh Atid, in Israel's elections, making it a key element of a future coalition. Netanyahu's ticket combining his rightist Likud party with the ultranationalist Yisrael Beiteinu faction won 31 parliamentary seats, according to the projections, a sharp decline from the combined 42 seats held by the two parties in the outgoing 120-member legislature.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the increasingly polarized political map, Pennsylvania's Eighth District is a true swing district. Covering Bucks County and part of Montgomery, its voters stick to the middle of the road. They tend to be conservative fiscally, but skew slightly left on social issues, according to pollsters. They sent a Republican to Congress in 2004, voted Democratic in the next two House elections, and turned back to the GOP in 2010. National observers have listed this year's contest as one of the top House races in the country, and it is widely expected to be one of the few close fights in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Aaron David Miller
In one of his more reflective songs, "Man in the Mirror," the late Michael Jackson enshrined a bit of wisdom for the ages: "If you wanna make the world a better place, take a look at yourself and then make a change. "   MJ was on to something. He may not have known much about politics. But the capacity to see the world as it is — and oneself as well — is a critically important component of success in politics and in life. With that in mind, here are a few honest looks in the mirror I'd like to hear about but assuredly never will.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Troy Graham and Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
After listening to arguments Monday, a federal judge promised to rule "with dispatch," on whether to block Pennsylvania from using 2001 political boundaries for the forthcoming primary election. The state Supreme Court ruled 4-3 last month to toss out a plan to reapportion the state's House and Senate seats, saying the map was too badly gerrymandered to be legal. The Supreme Court suggested the state revert to using the maps from 2001 for the April 24 election. Republican House and Senate leaders - as well as Hispanic voter advocates - then turned to the federal court, seeking a restraining order to prevent the state from doing so. They argued that the populations of the districts have shifted so much in the past decade that using the previous boundaries would be unconstitutional, violating the "one person, one vote" principle of districts of roughly equal size.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Troy Graham and Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
Despite a precedence of acrimony and blown deadlines, City Council members say they believe they can complete the once-a-decade task of redrawing Philadelphia's political map in less than a month. At the start of Council's first public hearing on the matter Tuesday, President Anna C. Verna predicted an ordinance to reset the districts and account for population shifts would be introduced Sept. 8. After a hearing, redistricting could be passed Sept. 22 "if all goes well," she said.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
The drawing of legislative district maps that takes place every 10 years should be nonpartisan, transparent, and free from any financial influence. But that doesn't appear to be the case in New Jersey, where the commission redrawing the state's political map will hit a deadline Thursday amid secretive fund-raising that violates principles of open government. The five Democrats and five Republicans on the Apportionment Commission are likely to declare Thursday that they cannot agree on a new map establishing boundaries for the state's 40 legislative districts.
NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Cynthia Burton, Inquirer Staff Writer
As political leaders redraw New Jersey's political map following the 2010 census, one of the biggest players - and biggest mysteries - is the Center for a Better New Jersey. The center, formed in 2009 to guide Republican Party officials through the redistricting process, has received a total of $75,000 in donations from a pair of congressmen and four legislators. Beyond that figure, it is unclear who has given money to the group - and how much it has received. Democrats argue that donors can flood it with money to get around the state's pay-to-play laws.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By Emily Tartanella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Throughout Europe and the Middle East, Mira Awad is a celebrated entertainer. But when she's in the home of fellow singer Achinoam Nini, who goes by the stage name Noa, she's a musical partner and a friend. And Mira, 34, who is an Israeli Arab, and Noa, 40, who is an Israeli Jew, make a statement about unity every time they appear together onstage. Though they're highly acclaimed in their home country, representing Israel at the 2009 Eurovision song contest in Moscow, they are only now about to embark on their first American tour.
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