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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Patrick Quinn, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - The Taliban and the United States said Tuesday they would hold talks within days on finding a political solution to ending nearly 12 years of war in Afghanistan, as the international coalition formally handed over control of the country's security to the Afghan army and police. The Taliban met a key U.S. demand by pledging not to use Afghanistan as a base to threaten other countries, although the Americans said it must also denounce al-Qaeda. President Obama cautioned that the process won't be quick or easy.
NEWS
June 4, 1986
I am writing concerning Andrew Maykuth's May 21 article relating to Camden County Freeholder Joseph Milano's vindictiveness while in political office. To use this office as a way of "getting even" with those who oppose him is despicable. In my opinion he is extremely undeserving of his $17,000 annual "supplemental" income paid at the expense of decent hardworking taxpayers. May the November election bring Mr. Milano his "just due. " Diane C. Lusk Lindenwold, N.J.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
With Donald Trump unopposed on the Republican side, New Jersey Democrats will cast some of the season's last votes on a contested presidential nomination on June 7. As the Editorial Board detailed before the Pennsylvania primary, despite the enthusiasm generated by Bernie Sanders, HILLARY CLINTON is better prepared for the office. South Jersey Democrats will also decide three congressional nominations. The most heated contest is in the Camden County-based First District, whose freshman congressman, Donald Norcross, likes to say he's just an electrician in a tie. But Norcross harnesses a lot more power than the average working man. The son of a labor leader and brother of South Jersey's top Democratic power broker, Norcross headed the regional AFL-CIO before his path to political office was cleared by the precisely timed midterm retirement of the state Assembly speaker himself.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAPPY FERNANDEZ once had some choice advice for women brave enough to run for political office: "Keep a clear head, a big, warm heart, but have real tough layers of alligator hide. " It was hard to picture Happy Fernandez with alligator hide, but as for a clear head and big, warm heart, she was the champ. She might have been feeling the sting a little when she gave that advice in 1999, having just lost her try for mayor of Philadelphia - the first and only high-profile woman to go for that office.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
FORMER city Bail Commissioner Tim O'Brien was arrested Sunday for allegedly roughing up his girlfriend. O'Brien, 50, allegedly grabbed his girlfriend by her hair and smacked her face into a wall on March 31, said Officer Jillian Russell, a police spokeswoman. The incident occurred about 11:30 p.m. on Pickwick Street near Almond, in Port Richmond. The 35-year-old woman, whom the Daily News is not identifying, was taken to Temple University Hospital for treatment, Russell said.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Amanda Hess In 2012, the number of women serving in the U.S. Senate reached a historic high: 20 out of 100. And so we continue to debate about the underrepresentation of women in politics, and the debate continues to hinge on the differences between men and women. Some argue that women are unsuited for political office because they're naturally less assertive and dominant; others claim women are better suited for modern leadership roles because they're more compassionate than their male peers.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rose Toll, 85, a former state legislator and Democratic ward leader and the widow of Congressman Herman Toll, died Monday of complications of Alzheimer's disease at a life-care community in Voorhees, N.J., where she lived the last five years. Mrs. Toll spent six years in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and was the principal sponsor of the state Generic Drug Law, which allows druggists to substitute generic drugs for name brands. Born Rose Ornstein, Mrs. Toll grew up in Kensington, where her father owned a drugstore.
NEWS
September 22, 2006
I'VE BEEN a Philadelphian for over 35 years and have never had the compulsion to respond to any newspaper political commentary. But I'm offended enough to respond to the Sept. 15 Jill Porter column ("Campbell's the wrong choice"). Philadelphia appears to be in a unique political position regarding the mayoral election in '07. The candidates whose names have been mentioned, State Rep. Dwight Evans, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, ex-Councilman Michael Nutter, former Controller Jonathan Seidel, State Sen. Anthony Williams and possibly Democratic Party chairman and Rep. Bob Brady all seem to be more than qualified to lead this great city.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
With no divisive issues facing its approximately 4,100 residents and little material available for use as election fodder by its candidates, the May 21 primary battle for the Second Ward commissioner's seat in Upper Moreland doesn't rank as history's most compelling political race. Incumbent Republican Bert Parrish, 59, was appointed to the seat in April 1989 after the death of former Commissioner James J. Gould and then ran unopposed in the November 1990 election. He now is being challenged by Greg Monaghan, 28, a novice whose political resume includes a stint as a member of the local Republican committee in the last election.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 30, 2016
With Donald Trump unopposed on the Republican side, New Jersey Democrats will cast some of the season's last votes on a contested presidential nomination on June 7. As the Editorial Board detailed before the Pennsylvania primary, despite the enthusiasm generated by Bernie Sanders, HILLARY CLINTON is better prepared for the office. South Jersey Democrats will also decide three congressional nominations. The most heated contest is in the Camden County-based First District, whose freshman congressman, Donald Norcross, likes to say he's just an electrician in a tie. But Norcross harnesses a lot more power than the average working man. The son of a labor leader and brother of South Jersey's top Democratic power broker, Norcross headed the regional AFL-CIO before his path to political office was cleared by the precisely timed midterm retirement of the state Assembly speaker himself.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
The First Congressional District Democratic primary in New Jersey easily could have been a sleeper: an incumbent with big name recognition facing a challenge from an upstart newcomer. But that has not been the case. The June 7 race pits long shot Alex Law, 25, of Voorhees, hoping to score a political upset over Rep. Donald Norcross in his first reelection bid. The winner will face Republican Bob Patterson in the November election. Patterson, of Haddonfield, is unchallenged in the GOP primary.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
OF ALL THE state politicians who got caught up in the investigation involving payoffs from a political lobbyist, Louise Bishop's case troubled me the most. I didn't want to believe that the venerable state rep would get caught up in shady financial dealings. I secretly hoped that prosecutors were mistaken and that somehow it would be revealed that the allegations that Bishop had accepted money on the sly from an undercover operative were false. Sadly, they weren't. Yesterday, Bishop pleaded no-contest to one count of failing to disclose that she received $1,500 from Tyron Ali on her annual financial-disclosure forms.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Public disgust with politics is widespread for good reason. Voters routinely see elected officials using power to suit their own interests rather than the public's. Pennsylvania politicians provided a blatant example when they sat down to draw new district lines for state and federal legislators in 2011. Required every 10 years as the population grows and shifts, redistricting is meant to ensure that each voting district has roughly the same number of people. Districts are also supposed to be as compact as possible, keeping neighboring communities together.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. recalls a curious child with a seat at the table as the grown-ups in West Philadelphia plotted campaigns for political office independent of the Democratic machine. Anthony H. Williams was there in the late 1960s and early 1970s because his father, Hardy Williams, was a chief plotter. "He always appeared more mature than his age," Goode said of the younger Williams. "Little Tony, as we called him, was always around and always interested in what we were doing.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
A LONGTIME FRIEND and mentor now in his late 70s emailed last week after another poll showed Tom Corbett badly - as in really badly - trailing Tom Wolf for governor. The email asked if Pennsylvania has a political mercy rule. For the unaware, a mercy rule ends a sporting event early if one team takes a lead considered to be insurmountable. Maybe we should think about it. Polls suggest that Corbett is headed toward historic rejection as the first Pennsylvania chief executive unable to win re-election.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
SAVVY political observers won't be shocked to learn that a greater percentage of women hold legislative office in Afghanistan than in Pennsylvania. Yes, Afghanistan. The Center for American Women in Politics, at Rutgers, ranks Pennsylvania 38th among states in the U.S., with women holding 17 percent of legislative seats in Harrisburg. Women make up 28 percent of parliament in Afghanistan. But change might be in the wind. Kathleen Kane was the first woman to win as attorney general in the state.
NEWS
October 26, 2013
Perhaps the challenger in this fall's race for Philadelphia controller would like it to be a referendum on the reform efforts of a man who isn't even in the running: Mayor Nutter. And two-term City Controller Alan Butkovitz's involvement with local Democratic politics doesn't make him a natural enemy of an entrenched machine that lets politics and patronage get in the way of efficient, cost-effective government. But as controller, Butkovitz has been a nemesis of City Hall more often than he has been its ally.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Karen J. DeYoung, Washington Post
DOHA, Qatar - U.S.-Taliban peace talks could start in this Persian Gulf city as early as Sunday. Or the political office that the Taliban opened here last week for that purpose, more than a year and a half after it was first proposed, could be shuttered before negotiations even begin. "We need to see if we can get back on track," visiting Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday. "I don't know if that's possible or not. If there is not a decision to move forward by the Taliban in short order, then we may have to consider whether or not the office has to be closed.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Amanda Hess In 2012, the number of women serving in the U.S. Senate reached a historic high: 20 out of 100. And so we continue to debate about the underrepresentation of women in politics, and the debate continues to hinge on the differences between men and women. Some argue that women are unsuited for political office because they're naturally less assertive and dominant; others claim women are better suited for modern leadership roles because they're more compassionate than their male peers.
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