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NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Debra Nussbaum
Because January is the month when we resolve to do better, I am proposing some manners resolutions for 2013. However, because I am 58 years old, I realize that what I consider ill-mannered might be acceptable behavior among the always-wired generation. For example, I would not have broadcast the birth of my children on Facebook, as I think that detracts from the enjoyment of personal family moments. But for younger people, that is perfectly appropriate. Therefore, I am giving my 20-year-old son, Matt, a college sophomore, the chance to respond to my resolutions.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | by Shaun D. Mullen , Daily News Staff Writer Staff Writer Gloria Campisi and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
He was the last Kennedy. Uncle Edward Kennedy remains an outspoken, if aging, presence in the U.S. Senate. Cousins Patrick and Kathleen Kennedy have their own political careers. Sister Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg is an author, sometime lawyer and mother of three children. But only 38-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr., it seems, had what it took to carry the mythic Kennedy torch into the next century. We knew much about his father, the 35th president of the United States.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAPPY FERNANDEZ once had some choice advice for women brave enough to run for political office: "Keep a clear head, a big, warm heart, but have real tough layers of alligator hide. " It was hard to picture Happy Fernandez with alligator hide, but as for a clear head and big, warm heart, she was the champ. She might have been feeling the sting a little when she gave that advice in 1999, having just lost her try for mayor of Philadelphia - the first and only high-profile woman to go for that office.
NEWS
October 29, 1998
Voters, candidates, issues and the election process Much has been said of the deplorable condition of politics in this country. Much has also been said of voters' apathy and the poor turnout at the polls. Could the two be related? In a democracy, we get the government we deserve. Let us pull together to make our country the best that it can be by pulling the lever Tuesday. Norma D'Alessandro Havertown The televised debates of the gubernatorial candidates (Inquirer, Oct. 22)
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A five-minute car ride one recent autumn morning was all it took to transform second-grade teacher Kathleen Simon into candidate Kathleen Simon. When she hit the suburban sidewalks wearing her bright red "Vote for Simon" sweat shirt, Simon seemed at ease promoting her candidacy for a spot on the Monroe Township Council. She quickly ran down some tricks of the canvassing trade: Do all you can to avoid waking people up. Approach houses where lawn mowers and jiggling window shades indicate activity.
NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By George Anastasia and Maureen Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When it came to local politics, South Jersey Democratic Party kingpin George E. Norcross III offered two ways of dealing with his political adversaries - he wanted one appointed a judge, and he wanted "to crush" the other. "I am doing everything humanly possible . . . things that are distasteful to get John Harrington on the bench," Norcross said in a secretly recorded conversation made public yesterday, "because I know that is the only way I can get rid of him. " At another point in the same 2001 conversation, Norcross said another adversary, Ted Rosenberg, "is history, and he is done . . . and anything I can do to crush his ass . . . " Harrington, who has since been appointed a state judge, and Rosenberg were Burlington County lawyers active in the Democratic Party and at odds with Norcross.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Saying it's time for "real people" to hold public office, a former national chief of the American Legion has announced his candidacy for lieutenant governor. Dominic DiFrancesco, a Republican from Middletown, says he's running for the state's second-highest office to help change the focus of government. "I am not a politician and I have never run for office," DiFrancesco said at a well-attended Capitol rally yesterday, "(But) it's time for real people with real solutions to step up to the plate.
NEWS
October 11, 2005 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raj Bhakta, the dapper but ultimately hapless Philadelphian fired by Donald Trump in last year's The Apprentice, may be setting himself up for another form of public whupping. Bhakta, who now lives in Fort Washington, says he is very close to deciding to run a longshot campaign for the 13th District congressional seat held by U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz (D., Pa.). "Why do I want to get my brains beaten in?" he asks. "Because I've always had a deep love of this country. I have a special appreciation as a first-generation American.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying the Supreme Court "has been lost to us," the president of the National Organization for Women yesterday urged an audience of college students to work to elect women to legislative office and to consider running for office themselves. "We can kiss the Supreme Court goodbye," Patricia Ireland told the audience of about 300 students, who gave her a standing ovation at the conclusion of her speech at Temple University's Sullivan Hall. "We are being stymied by being excluded," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | By W. Russell G. Byers
About three years ago, City Controller Joseph C. Vignola made an astonishing confession to City Councilman Thacher Longstreth. As Vignola put it at the time, the city controller's "role of city watchdog had, unfortunately, been reduced to that of a creature with a bark much larger than its bite. " Mayor Wilson Goode's moves last week to destroy the independence of the city controller's office have probably taken even the bark out of the job. What the mayor has done makes it clear that politics is more important than independence when it comes to watching over the city's finances.
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