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April 24, 1994 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mary Virginia Weber was a retired teacher with no political aspirations when she and her husband, Al, moved to the Hidden Lakes section of the township in 1980 with plans to enjoy their golden years. Little did Weber know that she would be present at the birth of a new form of township government and go on to serve three consecutive council terms and one stint as a state assemblywoman. Now the stalwart Republican is stepping back. She has announced that she will not run again for the Township Council.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By ACEL MOORE
As a member of this newspaper's Editorial Board, I have had the opportunity - or should I say task? - of interviewing scores of political candidates. Over the last 12 years, both during spring primaries and in general elections, I have been privy to the off-the-record cases made by candidates seeking office and this newspaper's editorial endorsement. I have seen many bright, innovative political leaders. And I have seen potential leaders unusually eloquent in articulating their views on the myriad issues facing the city, state and nation.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Debra Nussbaum
Because January is the month when we resolve to do better, I am proposing some manners resolutions for 2013. However, because I am 58 years old, I realize that what I consider ill-mannered might be acceptable behavior among the always-wired generation. For example, I would not have broadcast the birth of my children on Facebook, as I think that detracts from the enjoyment of personal family moments. But for younger people, that is perfectly appropriate. Therefore, I am giving my 20-year-old son, Matt, a college sophomore, the chance to respond to my resolutions.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Patrick Kerkstra
One of the most bitter and longest-running civil wars in Philadelphia politics came to an end this month, and almost nobody noticed. That's the price of irrelevance, which is perhaps the most charitable adjective one can use to describe the state of Philadelphia's Republican City Committee, a barely functioning party apparatus that often struggles to field credible candidates for offices big and small. For four years, the city's GOP has been riven into two blocs: an old guard, largely content to hold on to its share of the city's dwindling patronage jobs, and a cast of relative newcomers disgusted by the party's stagnation and insignificance.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
OF ALL THE state politicians who got caught up in the investigation involving payoffs from a political lobbyist, Louise Bishop's case troubled me the most. I didn't want to believe that the venerable state rep would get caught up in shady financial dealings. I secretly hoped that prosecutors were mistaken and that somehow it would be revealed that the allegations that Bishop had accepted money on the sly from an undercover operative were false. Sadly, they weren't. Yesterday, Bishop pleaded no-contest to one count of failing to disclose that she received $1,500 from Tyron Ali on her annual financial-disclosure forms.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | by Shaun D. Mullen , Daily News Staff Writer Staff Writer Gloria Campisi and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
He was the last Kennedy. Uncle Edward Kennedy remains an outspoken, if aging, presence in the U.S. Senate. Cousins Patrick and Kathleen Kennedy have their own political careers. Sister Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg is an author, sometime lawyer and mother of three children. But only 38-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr., it seems, had what it took to carry the mythic Kennedy torch into the next century. We knew much about his father, the 35th president of the United States.
NEWS
October 29, 1998
Voters, candidates, issues and the election process Much has been said of the deplorable condition of politics in this country. Much has also been said of voters' apathy and the poor turnout at the polls. Could the two be related? In a democracy, we get the government we deserve. Let us pull together to make our country the best that it can be by pulling the lever Tuesday. Norma D'Alessandro Havertown The televised debates of the gubernatorial candidates (Inquirer, Oct. 22)
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A five-minute car ride one recent autumn morning was all it took to transform second-grade teacher Kathleen Simon into candidate Kathleen Simon. When she hit the suburban sidewalks wearing her bright red "Vote for Simon" sweat shirt, Simon seemed at ease promoting her candidacy for a spot on the Monroe Township Council. She quickly ran down some tricks of the canvassing trade: Do all you can to avoid waking people up. Approach houses where lawn mowers and jiggling window shades indicate activity.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. recalls a curious child with a seat at the table as the grown-ups in West Philadelphia plotted campaigns for political office independent of the Democratic machine. Anthony H. Williams was there in the late 1960s and early 1970s because his father, Hardy Williams, was a chief plotter. "He always appeared more mature than his age," Goode said of the younger Williams. "Little Tony, as we called him, was always around and always interested in what we were doing.
NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By George Anastasia and Maureen Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When it came to local politics, South Jersey Democratic Party kingpin George E. Norcross III offered two ways of dealing with his political adversaries - he wanted one appointed a judge, and he wanted "to crush" the other. "I am doing everything humanly possible . . . things that are distasteful to get John Harrington on the bench," Norcross said in a secretly recorded conversation made public yesterday, "because I know that is the only way I can get rid of him. " At another point in the same 2001 conversation, Norcross said another adversary, Ted Rosenberg, "is history, and he is done . . . and anything I can do to crush his ass . . . " Harrington, who has since been appointed a state judge, and Rosenberg were Burlington County lawyers active in the Democratic Party and at odds with Norcross.
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