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NEWS
August 10, 2002 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Eager to win support from America's fastest-growing minority, both major political parties are fielding record numbers of Hispanic candidates in this fall's elections and seeking votes in key cities and states where the Hispanic population is surging. Hispanics could hold the key not only to this year's elections for control of Congress, but also to the 2004 contest for the White House. At this week's summer meeting of the Democratic National Committee in Las Vegas, party strategists said their hopes of winning control of the House hinged on victories by Hispanic candidates such as Dario Herrera in Las Vegas and on Hispanics' votes for non-Hispanic Democratic candidates in places such as Iowa and North Carolina.
NEWS
February 17, 2011
As the Egyptian people begin to create their own democracy ("Egypt military's vote timetable stirs debate," Tuesday), they will do well to consider how our Constitution establishes the three separate and independent branches of government. But when considering how to populate the legislative branch, they should look to more modern constitutions. Legislative seats in this country are generally assigned to districts that each elect a single representative. This creates a winner-take-all politics, and it produces a system dominated by two political parties.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's political parties yesterday struck back at a group of judicial candidates supported by Gov. Casey, announcing the formation of a committee to help their own slate win six Philadelphia Common Pleas Court seats. Officials of the newly formed Committee to Protect the People's Choice and of a competing committee supporting Casey's choices charged each other with having made their endorsement decisions undemocratically, while agreeing that the issue facing voters next Tuesday will be the way judges are selected in the city.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | By JOSEPH P. McLAUGHLIN JR
Conspicuously absent from the newspaper columns of free advice offered Mayor Rendell in recent weeks has been any reference to two institutions that are indispensible to any strategy for saving Philadelphia: the political parties. The idea that parties might be important today sounds antique. The more fashionable prescriptions for city problems are better management and more aid from other areas of governments. To see Philadelphia's problems as simply managerial is to reinforce the myth that "one good man" (or woman)
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | by Reginald K. Brack Jr., New York Times
Politics has always been a contact sport in America, but in the 1994 campaign, negative messages, groundless attacks on character, outright lying and distorted images dragged political advertising to a new low. The cutthroat ads followed a disturbing formula. In clipped, agitated tones, attack your opponent's character. Distort his record. Associate her with extremists. Work in a between-the-lines racist message. And by all means, steer clear of substance. Examples abound.
NEWS
July 15, 1989
When Pennsylvanians filed their income-tax returns this year, the form asked if they'd like their refunds to go into a conservation fund - which ended up with more than $350,000. All told, 38 states offer more than 100 such options, ranging from cancer research in Arkansas to a veterans' cemetery in New Mexico. Obviously, the commonwealth could go further in panhandling its taxpayers for favorite causes. So the state chairmen of the two major political parties have been planning to recommend a new cause, with a $1 donation to be solicited annually from all taxpayers when they file.
NEWS
October 11, 1994
The sour taste left by federal lawmakers who headed home last weekend is strong enough to suggest that Congress can't do anything right. Americans may say exactly that by massacring incumbents at the polls four weeks from today. In reality, Congress' two-year record under President Clinton is a mixture of major successes and failures, and both political parties share responsibility for not getting more done. With little help from the opposition party, Democrats in Congress passed a major deficit-cutting package last year and a comprehensive crime bill this year.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
In case you missed it in all the holiday rush, one of the most intriguing news items of recent weeks was the announcement that the national Democratic and Republican parties have agreed to form a bipartisan commission to work on a crucial problem that vitally affects them both: How to improve the television ratings of their national conventions. It's a real problem. Republican national chairman Frank J. Fahrenkopf Jr. noted at the press conference announcing the commisssion that in some markets convention coverage had been whipped in the ratings race by professional wrestling.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's rare that the monthly jobs report doesn't elicit some kind of response on Wall Street. But that happened Friday after the U.S. Labor Department reported that the nation's payrolls added 96,000 jobs in August, and that the unemployment rate fell to 8.1 percent - both statistics only barely positive. The markets hardly blinked, and major indexes stayed at their highest levels in more than four years after Thursday's surge. The 96,000 jobs continued the upward trend of growth, but at a rate that will do little to bring employment to pre-recession levels any time soon.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rotan Lee pulled a black-cased folding knife from the pocket of his pin-striped suit, opened the blade, and slashed open the box on his desk. "Oh, this is a goodie," he said, lifting a stuffed brown buffalo out of the box. Then he looked at the card, which read, "Imagine a convention where seldom is heard a discouraging word. " Lee mused, "Where the deer and the antelope play . . . here's the problem, there's no buffalo in that song. Oh, yes, yes there is. " The stuffed buffalo came from Denver, one of nine cities wooing the Democrats for their political convention in 2000.
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NEWS
March 12, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
CITY COMMISSIONER Stephanie Singer, part of a three-member panel that oversees elections in Philadelphia, has a problem with the way her political party will select a candidate today for a vacant City Council at-large seat. Singer, in an email Sunday to about 4,000 people on her campaign list, questioned the "accountability" and "transparency" in the Democratic process. Singer said in other Pennsylvania counties, candidates for a special election are voted on by a political party's committee members, who are elected by voters.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
Flag down on coed gridiron play Sometimes the old ways had meaning that, sadly, is being lost in our increasingly genderless world ("On further review, girl can play," March 15). We used to teach boys to honor the strengths and protect the inherent differences in girls. We raised men who shielded their wives and daughters from the particular harm that can come to a woman because of her physical and emotional differences - not because she was weak, but because she was differently made and wired.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
By Joe Ferraro Montgomery County officials say they are coming up $750,000 short in last year's budget, and they are looking for cuts. I have a suggestion that could save about $300,000, maybe more. Pennsylvania has a closed primary system, meaning that only Democrats and Republicans may participate in the primary election. The turnouts are abysmal. Many times, less than 25 percent of the population shows up at the polls. Hence the savings: Plan No. 1: Only open 25 percent of the polling places for the primaries.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb and Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - Egypt's largest opposition bloc said Tuesday that it would boycott the country's forthcoming parliamentary elections, heightening the prospect of future instability after months of political crisis and damaging the credibility of the country's fledgling democracy. The National Salvation Front, a loose coalition of liberal and leftist political parties, said that it would boycott the late April vote because the Islamist government of President Mohamed Morsi did not consult it in passing a new electoral law and disregarded pressure from the group for, among other things, a new cabinet and a redrafting of the country's constitution.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Nobody ever said criminals were smart," Chester County District Attorney Thomas P. Hogan said Friday, summing up an unusual case his office had won the day before. A West Chester couple were convicted by a Chester County Court jury on misdemeanor charges of forging a letter opposing a district judge during a 2011 primary that the judge then won. The jury found Donald Skomsky, 59, and his wife, Valerie Palfy, 48, guilty of writing a letter smearing Judge Rita A. Arnold. Investigators found that an employee of a stationery firm not only remembered copying the letters for the couple, but also recognized Arnold's name on them because a relative worked for the judge.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - The leader of Egypt's largest Islamist ultraconservative party announced Tuesday that he is forming a new political party, splitting from the Salafi Al-Nour, which has emerged as the country's second-strongest political group. The new party is part of a proliferation of religion-based political parties. Another prominent ultraconservative TV preacher, who was a presidential candidate, has also announced plans to form a new party. The plans come just two months before President Mohammed Morsi is expected to call for new parliamentary elections.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | BY ROBERT E. HALL
THE UNTOLD story of 2012 is how "not" became the new relationship normal - not married, not a parent, not a close friend, not a loyal customer, not a committed employee, not a Democrat nor a Republican, not affiliated with organized religion. This flight from relationship flies in the face of a society that says individual relationships matter most and where many organizations attempt to brand themselves as relationship-focused. We speak in the poetry of relationships - home, family, friends, community, colleagues, customers, fellow citizens and even brothers and sisters in faith, but we increasingly live in the prose of divorce, single-parent families, transient communities, alienated employees and customers, partisan political discourse and religious divisiveness.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
By David M. Kennedy Barack Obama made history in 2008. It may now be his fate merely to mark time. Obama's election as the first black president closed a chapter - though surely not the book - in America's long, vexed racial history, just as John F. Kennedy's election amounted to a major cadence in the nation's turbulent religious history. Kennedy proved to be both the first and last Catholic president, in the sense that Catholicism has never since defined political identity as it did for most of the republic's first two centuries.
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