CollectionsPolitical Reform
IN THE NEWS

Political Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The discovery of an FBI listening device in the office of Mayor John F. Street 10 years ago this week had dramatic but unexpected consequences. The disclosure came just a month before a political rematch between Street and Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz, who had come within 9,500 votes of beating Street in 1999. Short term, the bug paradoxically was a political plus for Street. Without any evidence, Democratic Party leaders portrayed the federal investigation as an effort by the Bush administration to topple a Democratic mayor.
NEWS
June 25, 1996 | By E.J. DIONNE
Voters in search of reasons for their cynicism about politics need not look very far. They can point to that famous handshake between President Clinton and Speaker Newt Gingrich on a pleasant afternoon in New Hampshire. They clasped hands on an "agreement" to reform the political system. A year later, nothing has happened. Well, not quite nothing. Since the handshake, a powerful counteroffensive against the political reform has been launched. Gingrich is the most articulate critic of traditional approaches to reform.
NEWS
January 31, 2011
HEY, HOW YA enjoying your 2011 political leadership thus far? Tomorrow's the first day of February so, after a full month of brave-new-world reform and cooperation, I figure I'd check in and see how you like it. What's that? You haven't noticed much difference? Well, clearly you've been too busy shoveling snow to notice the wonderful, sweeping changes taking place all around us. Like what, you say? Like President Obama's bold action to "win the future," or, as Sarah Palin puts it, WTF. Like the president coming to Penn State on Wednesday to, according to the White House, stress "new investments in research and development . . . for energy-efficient buildings.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | Associated Press
SAO PAULO - Under pressure after more than a week of nationwide protests, Brazilian leader Dilma Rousseff said Monday her government will spend $23 billion more on public transportation, promised to push a plebiscite on political reform, and announced five core areas her government will focus on to improve government services. Rousseff made the announcement after meeting with leaders of a free-transit activist group that launched the first demonstrations more than a week ago. They said they would continue to protest, including lending their support to a Tuesday demonstration in Sao Paulo organized by other groups.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When an editor asked Li Shenzhi to write an article about his views on democracy, the 76-year-old scholar told his friend: "If you dare to publish it, I'll dare to speak. " The editor accepted the challenge. The January issue of China's Reform Magazine printed Li's article, which calls for rapid political reform and Western-style human rights and argues that "human rights are citizens' rights. " The long hush that fell over Chinese politics nine years ago, after government troops crushed the Tiananmen Square student protests, is finally showing signs of lifting.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The White House yesterday hailed the election of Boris N. Yeltsin as president of Russia and announced that Yeltsin would meet with President Bush here next Thursday. "We want to encourage reform and movement toward the democratic processes, movement towards (free) market processes, and we think these meetings are an important way to do that," said White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater. By inviting Yeltsin to visit Bush in the White House, the administration is not just trying to encourage democracy in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
TODAY, Pennsylvania enters the Tom Corbett era. The former state attorney general and Pittsburgh city councilman takes office during turbulent times, with a $4 billion hole in the state budget looming. Dealing with Pennsylvania's lingering fiscal problems is priority No. 1, but we're hopeful that Corbett can also make progress in an important area that has long stalled in Harrisburg: political reform. He made the most convincing argument for reform in decades . . . before even taking one action as governor.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
Organized in 1894, the Civic Club of Philadelphia joined together prominent Philadelphia women like Cornelia Frothingham, Mary Channing Wister, Alice Potter Lippincott, Caroline Brown Lea, and Sara Yorke Stevenson, who served as the first president. The group sought to promote "by education and active cooperation a higher public spirit and better public order. " Initially, the club was organized into four departments: municipal government, education, social service, and art. Each department operated somewhat autonomously and created its own committees.
NEWS
July 30, 1993
Japan, the country where nothing changes very rapidly, has turned out to be full of political surprises. First, the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), which ruled for 38 years, split apart over corruption scandals. Then, the LDP lost its majority in recent elections. But most observers still predicted that the same old faces would form the next government. Instead, something startling happened, which is bound to affect U.S.-Japanese relations. As Inquirer columnist Trudy Rubin predicted on our Commentary Page nine days ago, the key to Japan's future wound up in the hands of a new populist party - the Japan New Party - and its leader Morihiro Hosokawa.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
H. Norman Weiss - builder of Center City office towers, developer of movie houses and backstage supporter of political reform - died Jan. 8 at age 89 at Leader Nursing Center in Cherry Hill. He was a resident of Moorestown. Born in 1901 in Johnsonburg, Pa., Mr. Weiss came to Philadelphia as a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, from which he graduated in 1923. He went to work for Heymann & Bros., at the time one of the city's largest real estate firms. Beginning as a rent collector, he became a partner in the firm in 1932, going on to develop some city landmarks, including 1616 Walnut St., 1700 Walnut St. and the Medical Arts Tower at 16th and Sansom Streets.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The discovery of an FBI listening device in the office of Mayor John F. Street 10 years ago this week had dramatic but unexpected consequences. The disclosure came just a month before a political rematch between Street and Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz, who had come within 9,500 votes of beating Street in 1999. Short term, the bug paradoxically was a political plus for Street. Without any evidence, Democratic Party leaders portrayed the federal investigation as an effort by the Bush administration to topple a Democratic mayor.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | Associated Press
SAO PAULO - Under pressure after more than a week of nationwide protests, Brazilian leader Dilma Rousseff said Monday her government will spend $23 billion more on public transportation, promised to push a plebiscite on political reform, and announced five core areas her government will focus on to improve government services. Rousseff made the announcement after meeting with leaders of a free-transit activist group that launched the first demonstrations more than a week ago. They said they would continue to protest, including lending their support to a Tuesday demonstration in Sao Paulo organized by other groups.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
Organized in 1894, the Civic Club of Philadelphia joined together prominent Philadelphia women like Cornelia Frothingham, Mary Channing Wister, Alice Potter Lippincott, Caroline Brown Lea, and Sara Yorke Stevenson, who served as the first president. The group sought to promote "by education and active cooperation a higher public spirit and better public order. " Initially, the club was organized into four departments: municipal government, education, social service, and art. Each department operated somewhat autonomously and created its own committees.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
JUST WHEN Superintendent Arlene Ackerman's career in Philadelphia jumped the shark - that television term describing the moment a show starts its irreversible end - depends on whom you ask. Some maintain her handling of the racial violence at South Philadelphia High. Others point to her intervention in a contract, and others to the whopping budget deficit. We've reserved judgment, because we believe success or failure in that job is too complicated to be summed up in one action. Another reason we've hesitated is that it's too easy to claim Ackerman failed without acknowledging exactly why, and what happens next.
NEWS
April 9, 2011 | Associated Press
BEIRUT - A mass protest calling for sweeping changes in Syria's authoritarian regime turned bloody yesterday, with the government and protesters both claiming to have suffered heavy casualties as the country's three-week uprising entered a dangerous new phase. Human-rights activists and witnesses said Syrian security forces opened fire on tens of thousands of protesters in the volatile southern city of Daraa, killing at least 25 people and wounding hundreds. But state-run TV said 19 policemen and members of the security forces had been killed when gunmen opened fire on them.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
It was too good to be true. The dream of peaceful Egyptian political reform ended Wednesday in Tahrir Square when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak sent rent-a-thugs to attack peaceful demonstrators with machetes, clubs, and Molotov cocktails. Journalists were also targets. I still have hope that the idealistic young social networkers who organized the Egyptian revolt can propel their country into an unprecedented era of representative government. But that hope hangs by a thread.
NEWS
January 31, 2011
HEY, HOW YA enjoying your 2011 political leadership thus far? Tomorrow's the first day of February so, after a full month of brave-new-world reform and cooperation, I figure I'd check in and see how you like it. What's that? You haven't noticed much difference? Well, clearly you've been too busy shoveling snow to notice the wonderful, sweeping changes taking place all around us. Like what, you say? Like President Obama's bold action to "win the future," or, as Sarah Palin puts it, WTF. Like the president coming to Penn State on Wednesday to, according to the White House, stress "new investments in research and development . . . for energy-efficient buildings.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
TODAY, Pennsylvania enters the Tom Corbett era. The former state attorney general and Pittsburgh city councilman takes office during turbulent times, with a $4 billion hole in the state budget looming. Dealing with Pennsylvania's lingering fiscal problems is priority No. 1, but we're hopeful that Corbett can also make progress in an important area that has long stalled in Harrisburg: political reform. He made the most convincing argument for reform in decades . . . before even taking one action as governor.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By Claudia Rosett
You won't see it on the evening news because TV cameras are not allowed into the dungeons of Libya. But somewhere in the prison system of Moammar Gadhafi, held in solitary confinement for almost four solid years now, Libya's leading democratic dissident is reportedly dying - 66 years old, too weak to speak, his skin discolored, his legs swollen. His name is Fathi Eljahmi. His offense has been to speak up for the cause of political pluralism in Libya, and to do something that we in free societies do daily - criticize his country's leadership.
NEWS
March 4, 2007 | By Amy Worden and Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For a decade, a driver shuttled Rep. Bill DeWeese back and forth from his legislative district in the southwestern corner of Pennsylvania to his parking spot by the Capitol. The taxpayers paid for the chauffeur. Last month, DeWeese got behind the wheel of his Chevy Silverado pickup and began driving himself. Some say the Greene County Democrat was reacting to the locomotive of change barreling through the General Assembly. DeWeese, who recently became House majority leader, said he was just a little late jumping on board.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|