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NEWS
March 6, 2012 | BY HALEY KMETZ, Daily News Staff Writer
STUDENTS at two Philadelphia universities say front-runner Mitt Romney doesn't turn them on. "He doesn't bring enough enthusiasm to the base," said Michael Wade, a Drexel University sophomore who's majoring in marketing and heads the school's College Republicans. Ann Marie Hager, a Drexel freshman majoring in political science, said many fellow students are turned off by the system in general. "It concerns me," said Hager. "I definitely see the apathy. " Across town, the College Republicans leader at Temple University is ambivalent about the GOP candidates.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | BY HALEY KMETZ, Daily News Staff Writer
Students at two Philadelphia universities say current frontrunner Mitt Romney doesn't turn them on. "He doesn't bring enough enthusiasm to the base," said Michael Wade, a Drexel University sophomore marketing major who heads the school's College Republicans. Ann Marie Hager, a Drexel freshman majoring in political science, said many students are turned off by the system in general. "It concerns me," said Hager. "I definitely see the apathy. " Across town, the College Republicans leader at Temple University is ambivalent about the GOP candidates.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Kathleen Iannello is associate professor of political science at Gettysburg College I have been teaching courses in American government for more than 25 years. I enjoy getting students interested in and excited about politics. I especially love engaging with them during a presidential election. Their interest is at a high point - most of them voting for the first time. My goal is to pull them into the process and get them hooked on real politics, making them eager to study political science.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | By John Allen Paulos
During this presidential primary season, the candidates have been questioned in numerous forums by countless talking heads with backgrounds in journalism, economics and law, but seldom by anyone knowledgeable in mathematics or science. This is odd, given the importance the candidates themselves ascribe to education, particularly in science and math. Nobody expects Messrs. Bradley, Bush, Gore and McCain to solve Maxwell's equations or spout out pi to 50 digits, but reasonable answers to a few elementary questions on mathematics and science would nevertheless be reassuring.
NEWS
January 28, 1999
Washington can be a subtle place, current evidence to the contrary. Take FIPSE, which is bureaucratese for the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education. It has $9.5 million to finance programs that claim to improve education at colleges and universities. Since 1972, the Department of Education has pretty much distributed the money as it saw fit. Colleges would submit applications, 1,700 most recently, and the FIPSE bureaucrats would use a peer-review system to decide which ideas might work best.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jamie Lynn Montgomery, former queen of the Burlington County Farm Fair, moved a step up in the world this month when she became the new Miss Burlington County. But the 1996 Cherokee High School graduate has not drifted far from her roots. During the pageant, Montgomery took top prize after performing a clogging routine, a skill she learned at age 7 with the Burlington County 4-H Cloggers - and the one that helped to propel her three years ago into the role of Farm Fair queen.
NEWS
February 1, 2010 | By MICHAEL P. TREMOGLIE
"NOT ALL populism is bad," writes Kimberly A. Strassel in the Jan. 29 Wall Street Journal. Presumably, the hoi polloi should be grateful for Ms. Strassel's qualified approval. Apparently, graduating from Princeton in 1994 with a B.A. in public policy and international affairs, as Ms. Strassel did, gives you the intellectual authority to decide which political beliefs of the man on the street are legitimate. The pronouncement by Lady Strassel is risible. Why an Ivy League education imbues you with a greater degree of righteousness than those who lack such education is not immediately apparent to anyone who doesn't have one. The four classic Roman virtues of pietas, fides, collegio and gravitas didn't include any mention of an Ivy League degree or being a Rhodes scholar.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Back when he was just a Princeton political science professor and not the guy who shook up New Jersey's political map, Larry Bartels wrote an essay titled "Uninformed Votes. " "The political ignorance of the American voter is one of the best-documented features of contemporary politics, but the political significance of this political ignorance is far from clear," Bartels wrote in the 1996 essay. His critics now say he could be describing himself. Since moving to New Jersey from Rochester, N.Y., in 1991, he has not voted in any election, has not registered to vote, could not care less who's in or out in Trenton, and has never worked on a political campaign.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the world waited for China to release the crew of a U.S. spy plane yesterday, students in John Kennedy's political science class at West Chester University were gaining some real-life lessons in the art of diplomacy and global power. There was relief that crew members would be coming home, but also some frustration that it took so long to get them out. And the students were not perturbed by the issue of an apology. "If we're the lone superpower, why does it matter if we apologize?"
NEWS
June 5, 2016
How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper By Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson Simon & Schuster. 455 pp. $28 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler In his first inaugural address, Ronald Reagan declared, "Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " In the ensuing decades, this view has become the mantra of the Republican Party - and of a sizable segment of the American electorate. In American Amnesia , Jacob Hacker, a professor of political science at Yale University, and Paul Pierson, a professor of political science at the University of California at Berkeley, provide an Everest of evidence that Reagan was wrong.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Kathleen Iannello is associate professor of political science at Gettysburg College I have been teaching courses in American government for more than 25 years. I enjoy getting students interested in and excited about politics. I especially love engaging with them during a presidential election. Their interest is at a high point - most of them voting for the first time. My goal is to pull them into the process and get them hooked on real politics, making them eager to study political science.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper By Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson Simon & Schuster. 455 pp. $28 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler In his first inaugural address, Ronald Reagan declared, "Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " In the ensuing decades, this view has become the mantra of the Republican Party - and of a sizable segment of the American electorate. In American Amnesia , Jacob Hacker, a professor of political science at Yale University, and Paul Pierson, a professor of political science at the University of California at Berkeley, provide an Everest of evidence that Reagan was wrong.
NEWS
May 24, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Benjamin P. Fiddler, 21, of Lafayette Hill, a college student, died Tuesday, May 17, after collapsing during a workout at his home. A Philadelphia emergency crew responded. Jeff Moran, spokesman for the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office, confirmed that Mr. Fiddler's death is a coroner's case. The cause of death was pending. Known as Ben, Mr. Fiddler was a political science major at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass., where he had just completed his junior year.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
When Donald Trump retweeted a quotation attributed to him but actually uttered by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini - "It is better to live one day as a lion than 100 years as a sheep" - it was a victory for Gawker, which had set up the automated Twitter account to poke fun at the Republican front-runner. It was also perfect fodder for a new digital politics program at Rutgers-Camden, which melds political science with digital studies. "The digital is not incidental to the conversation; it is core to the conversation," said Jim Brown, the English professor who heads the Digital Studies Center at Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - Talk about juice. Bruce Rastetter, a multimillionaire agribusiness baron and the largest GOP donor in Iowa, got almost all of the potential 2016 Republican presidential candidates - at least 11 of them - to agree to come to the Iowa State Fairgrounds on Saturday for a forum on agriculture issues. They were to sit down on stage for one-on-one, 20-minute interviews with Rastetter, discussing their positions on labeling for genetically modified food, proposed federal regulation of groundwater, foreign trade agreements - and, perhaps above all, the future of Iowa's important corn-based ethanol industry.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Tom Wolf stabbed the broom at an area rug, a dustpan in his other hand. The grit didn't budge. "Mr. Wolf," Aretha Spady said, "there's no cute way to do the rug. " She yanked the broom away from the Democratic candidate for governor of Pennsylvania and whisked it. "See, this is professional," Spady said. "Quick and to the point. " On a recent afternoon, Wolf was shadowing Spady, a home health aide, as she cared for her patient in a Northwest Philadelphia rowhouse. Maybe the visit would not directly win votes, but Wolf considered it important to his continuing education.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Pennsylvanians, we are going to have a primary May 20 whether we are ready or, more likely, not. As of this moment, there are seven Democratic gubernatorial candidates, who happen to agree on almost every subject. A few days ago, there were eight. Soon there may be six, possibly five. The number fluctuates, like The Bachelor but without, you know, the romance. Currently, Tom Wolf is the guy with the rose. Who? Exactly. The soft-spoken York County Democrat, not to be confused with the zeitgeisty, italicizing writer in the ice-cream suit, is the undisputed leader with 36 percent approval in the latest Franklin & Marshall poll, the favorite with virtually every demographic.
NEWS
October 26, 2013
Perhaps the challenger in this fall's race for Philadelphia controller would like it to be a referendum on the reform efforts of a man who isn't even in the running: Mayor Nutter. And two-term City Controller Alan Butkovitz's involvement with local Democratic politics doesn't make him a natural enemy of an entrenched machine that lets politics and patronage get in the way of efficient, cost-effective government. But as controller, Butkovitz has been a nemesis of City Hall more often than he has been its ally.
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