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Political System

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NEWS
February 3, 1992 | BY DONALD KAUL
Our political system, in case you haven't noticed, is wildly out of whack. Yes, I know, it's the work of geniuses, what with its checks and balances and all, but it was assembled a long time ago and now seems badly in need of overhaul; a ring job, at least. For example, last week President Bush nominated Andrew H. Card Jr. to be Secretary of Transportation, an event little noted by the nation's press or anyone else. It was a bizarre, typically American appointment. Card, while no dummy, has no more expertise in the field of transportation than your Aunt Nell.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
President Reagan said yesterday that the peaceful transition of power in America is "cause for us to wonder at our freedom" and to be grateful to veterans of the nation's wars. In his weekly radio address, Reagan also took issue with some critics who say that President-elect George Bush does not have a strong mandate because issues were not spelled out clearly enough during the campaign. In the Democratic response, House Speaker Jim Wright of Texas said the Democratic Congress looked forward to working with the Bush administration on expanding educational opportunities, improving the environment, raising the minimum wage and increasing the availability of day care for children.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | BY DONALD KAUL
What passes for political wisdom in this election year floats on a sea of myth, as blatherous in its way as an Academy Awards acceptance speech. Perhaps it's time to examine some of these basic, underlying, false assumptions of our political system. For example: The presidency is a hard, dirty job and only a fool would want it. This lie is bandied about a lot. Even Ross Perot, who styles himself a truth- teller, has bought into it. The president's doctor recently gave it credence when he said the president was in good health but under incredible stress.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a mini-congress at warp speed. Two committee meetings in the morning. Two floor sessions in the afternoon. Two bills passed by 1:35 p.m. No filibusters were going to slow things down for the more than 80 area high school students who bargained, argued and pleaded for their causes Friday as part of a model Congress in a library auditorium at Bucks County Community College. This congress was sponsored by the office of U.S. Rep. James Greenwood (R., Pa.). The students tested their wits and learned about the real Congress during a discussion with Greenwood afterward.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | by John R. Leopold
It's theater with funny hats and big red, white and blue balloons. It's summer camp for political junkies. It's the culmination of the Great American Road Show, the arduous primary election campaign that ends with the coronation of the party's nominees for president and vice president of the United States. When you walk out on the floor of a national political convention, you know you are on a stage with an international audience. There is a palpable thrill walking into a convention hall and seeing so many people from all over the country who have the same love of country and the political system.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She is still tiny, her presence bolstered by three-inch pumps in which, at age 70, she still walks purposefully. Her hair, once black, is now rinsed bluish-gray and styled in a youthful bob. And the voice - the tone still fiery, the diction still crisp, the oratory still captivating - urged more than 200 women gathered yesterday at the Greater Bay Resort and Country Club to "make a dent in the political system," just as she did by fighting for...
NEWS
October 29, 1994 | By William Raspberry
"Throwing the rascals out" never worked all that well as a way of cleaning up politics and improving our civic life. But at least we knew what it meant: that the incumbents had fallen so deeply into corruption, or had grown so indifferent to the public interest, that it was time to give the other party a chance. But the growing clamor for term limits and the anti-incumbent fever that, for instance, has Washington state on the brink of throwing out the powerful (and uncorrupt) Speaker of the House of Representatives and sending in his place an impotent freshman is not about rascals.
NEWS
June 14, 1989
WATCH OUT, WE'RE LOSING IT I have a passion for this country. But I think this country is blowing it. I think we have an atrociously short-sighted political system that prevents us from dealing with our real, long-term problems. And we are going to end up as a second-class country within my lifetime because of it. I think it's pathetic. And if you talk to any really intelligent political leaders in the country privately, they'll agree with you. But the political system is such that they can't do anything about it. To me the base cause of it is that we have an under-educated population that is unwilling to look at longer-term issues.
NEWS
April 28, 2006
YOUR APRIL 27 article on City Council's consideration of public financing of campaigns stated that the concept was received with disdain by the Council members present. It was not disdain, but skepticism. The skepticism stems from the understanding that there is no one approach to election reform that will "level the playing field," including campaign-contribution limits. The political system in Philadelphia is in need of more comprehensive reform. I've lost to that system, beat it and used it to get re-elected - so I clearly know it well.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Many young people live in carefree ignorance of their status as citizens, while others seize on public service and revel in their civic identity. What prompts some to commit themselves to society, and others to video games, pop music and the latest fashion trends? With a grant of $259,466 from the William T. Grant Foundation, which supports research on young people and the forces that shape their lives, researchers Daniel Hart of Rutgers University-Camden and James Youniss of the Catholic University of America in Washington plan to spend the next two years seeking to answer such questions.
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NEWS
July 13, 2016
By George Kohl The vision of our founders was of a government of, by, and for the people. And history tells the story of how our democracy has grown, from the days when only white, male property owners had rights to embracing African Americans and women as full voting participants. Today there's an extreme attack on our democracy, one that threatens to transform the government into one of, by, and for corporations and the 1 percent. Too many Americans believe the system is rigged, that politicians don't listen to the people.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
OSKALOOSA, Iowa - Donald Trump brought his quixotic, populist campaign for the presidency here Saturday, airing a litany of grievances with different politicians and institutions and pledging to "take back this country. " Speaking to an audience of about 1,500 people, including hundreds in an overflow room at a high school here 60 miles southeast of Des Moines, Trump declared the political system was broken, controlled by lobbyists and other influence-peddlers who wouldn't buy him - because he's so rich.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why did none of the Wall Street fat cats whose unchecked greed led to the banking collapse of 2008 ever go to prison? Why hasn't a single official from the last two White House administrations been prosecuted for assassinating, rather than arresting, American citizens as Islamist combatants? Why did the news media cheerfully adopt the euphemism "enhanced interrogation" when describing torture perpetrated by intelligence personnel? These are some of the questions Chris Hedges has asked over the last dozen years in his columns for Truthdig.com and in such books as Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle and Death of the Liberal Class . In his most vociferous attack yet on the political and civic culture of America, Wages of Rebellion: The Moral Imperative of Revolt , the author contends they are the sorts of issues that continue to anger Americans of all political leanings.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
Signs of growth The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society agrees that there is an urgent need to inspire young people to study horticulture as a profession and to raise awareness of the vital role of plants and gardens in our environment ("Is horticulture a withering profession?" Jan 6). But the society sees cause for optimism as well. Our membership has grown by 38 percent in the last three years, to 25,000 households. Among the fastest-growing groups of new members are those ages 18 to 35. We also see signs of increasing appreciation for horticulture and its value throughout our neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I just got a call from Matt Damon's agent," social critic and political activist Robert Jensen says in deadpan about his new book, Arguing for Our Lives: A User's Guide to Constructive Dialog . "Matt wants to turn my book into a major Hollywood film. " How could you go wrong with a sexy title like that? That's not to mention the content. A potent attack on the rabid, irrational saber-rattling that passes for political and social discourse today, Arguing for Our Lives is a cogent, closely argued, sober, yet passionate call for ordinary men and women to help save our democracy by reclaiming our intellect, by honing our powers of rational argumentation.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
KAHLIL BYRD is all about change, and I don't mean for a dollar or a fiver. No, sir. The change he wants is "disruptive politics" as a path to a better democracy. Byrd is former chief executive of Americans Elect, a 2012 effort that sought an alternative to the two-party presidential nominating process; he's current president of Students First, an education-reform group founded and headed by onetime Washington, D.C., schools chancellor Michelle Rhee. Byrd's keynoting an education conference at Penn on Saturday, "The Debate for America's Future: Assessing the Viability of Public Education Solutions.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Washington seems like a football team that calls three halfhearted running plays into the line and then punts as time runs out - in game after game. On Tuesday, it happened again at another crucial moment: Congress passed a temporary fix to the fiscal cliff that kept tax rates from rising on 99 percent of U.S. taxpayers, but postponed tough decisions on spending cuts for two months. "The problem is, we set up three more fiscal cliffs," Virginia Democratic Rep. Jim Moran said during late-night floor debate on the agreement.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Anyone hoping for more specifics on Mitt Romney's foreign policy views didn't glean them from the Republican convention. Romney barely mentioned foreign policy in his acceptance speech, other than dispensing a few crowd-pleasing zingers (like the false claim that "Obama has thrown . . . Israel under the bus"). Clearly, this avoidance was deliberate. Foreign policy is not a voter priority. And Romney wanted to argue that he could restore U.S. leadership "of the free world" by putting our economic house in order.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
TO EVERYTHING, there is a season, the Bible's book of Ecclesiastes first told us and songwriter Pete Seeger and rock band the Byrds later sang to us. And if a Republican nominee for president is looking to cast the vice-presidential pick in an all-American light, then we must be talking about hunting season. Deer & Deer Hunting magazine has a scoop for its October issue, available on newsstands Tuesday: U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan , of Wisconsin, tells the story of learning to hunt as an 11-year-old and now sharing the sport with his kids.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
MEXICO CITY - Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado, 77, who led Mexico from 1982 to 1988 during economic crisis and a devastating earthquake, died Sunday, the government said. President Felipe Calderon called Mr. De la Madrid "a Mexican with a profound commitment to the country" in a statement confirming his death. The cause of death was not revealed, but the former president had been hospitalized in Mexico City with respiratory problems since Dec. 17. His term was a grim time for most Mexicans, a six-year hangover after a spending binge by a previous government that was convinced soaring oil prices would never fall.
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