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Political Violence

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February 8, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1969, Bruno Barreto was a free-spirited, 14-year-old Rio de Janeiro youth who made a disturbing discovery when he went to school one morning. His best friend was absent, and for days, then weeks, no one offered an explanation for his disappearance. Barreto missed trading comic books and talking about girls and soccer with his pal and grew ever more worried. The next time he saw him was in a mug shot on the front page of the Rio newspapers. The youth and five other urban guerrillas had been killed in a bank robbery staged by a left-wing revolutionary group to fund its operations against Brazil's military dictatorship.
NEWS
October 8, 2013
WITH THE pathetic state of the American government, I am surprised there wasn't an army of citizens trying to take over the capital, so the people's lives can be addressed! All of these politicians have forgotten about the people. What good is health care when you have no jobs, no way to eat, no way to respect oneself, no way to live? Everyone, including the president, is out of touch with the people, who are suffering untold misery in this economic "depression" that they say we don't have.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | By GEORGE B.N. AYITTEY
To attribute the carnage in Rwanda and past massacres elsewhere in Africa to ancient tribal rivalries is unsatisfactory. Such rivalries exist throughout Africa. The real cause is the exploitation of ethnic differences by autocratic governments to maintain their grip on power. The colonialists did this but, in the post-colonial period, despotic African heads of state refined the stratagem. Although Somalia is ethnically homogenous, former military dictators played one clan against another in attempts to perpetuate their rule.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the last seven years, Liberian refugee Tommy O. Tarr has tried to shut the door on the nightmare that drove him out of his homeland: the bloody civil war that left 150,000 dead, created untold numbers of orphans and widows, and displaced half of the population. He mourned for his only child, a 14-year-old son killed during the war, and his wife, who disappeared amid the chaos. He watched in despair from afar as his country remained racked by political and ethnic violence and corruption, even after the war ended in 1997.
NEWS
January 14, 2011
POLITICAL violence comes from one direction - the right. Guns at political rallies, threats, vandalism - all right-wing. Conservatives believe that if you disagree with them, they have the right to kill you. That's not freedom, that's fascism. For all those who say it comes from both sides, tell me when is the last time a liberal shot somebody? James Morton Philadelphia
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | Daily News wire services
JOHANNESBURG 13 SLAIN IN S. AFRICA Thirteen blacks were shot or burned to death in townships around South Africa in political violence overnight, police said today. In the worst incident, gunmen in a minibus parked on a highway outside Johannesburg fired on a passing taxi, killing five people and seriously wounding five others, including a two-year-old girl. Meanwhile, the African National Congress and the government are making final preparations for a summit between ANC leader Nelson Mandela and President F.W. de Klerk to discuss the political violence, Mandela said today.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
Nelson Mandela said today that blacks could paralyze South Africa with a general strike, and warned of possible civil war if pro-apartheid whites won a referendum on reform next week. Mandela's warning came as 23 blacks were killed during the day, mostly in political violence involving rival groups, police said. If the right wing "comes to power and carries out its policies, civil war is unavoidable," the African National Congress leader told a news conference. Meanwhile, bombs blasted offices of President F.W. de Klerk's National Party, adding to the tension in advance of Tuesday's whites-only vote.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
South African President P.W. Botha will address the nation on television tonight and is widely expected to extend a year-old state of emergency. Informed sources at the state-run South African Broadcasting Corporation said Botha's speech, in English and Afrikaans, would almost certainly deal with the emergency. The emergency, which expires at midnight tomorrow, is widely expected to be renewed, and possibly reinforced, for at least another year. Botha declared emergency rule on June 12, 1986, amid a growing rebellion in townships where the black majority was violently agitating for racial equality.
NEWS
June 25, 2009 | By Emad Al-shara
A recent spate of attacks largely directed at Baghdad's Shia neighborhoods is fueling concerns that sectarian and political violence may be returning to the city. Residents are especially worried, given that American forces are to withdraw from Iraqi cities by next week. Shias haven't been the only victims. Car bombings have also occurred recently in the Dora district, which is predominantly Sunni. But some fear that the high number of incidents aimed at Shia targets indicates that sectarian and political violence is on the rise.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
South African President Pieter W. Botha attacked domestic and foreign news organizations yesterday, accusing them of distorting his policies. Speaking in Parliament, Botha also accused one unnamed South African newspaper of lying in its editorials. But he reserved most of his wrath for independently funded left-wing newspapers and free-lance agencies. "Most of these unashamedly support leftist and revolutionary groups," he said. "The entire matter concerning alternative media and alternative news agencies will have to be investigated and dealt with.
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NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
By international and historical standards, political violence is exceedingly rare in the United States. The last serious outburst was in 1968, with its bloody Democratic convention riots. By that standard, 2016 is, as yet, tame. It may not remain so. The political thuggery that shut down a Donald Trump rally in Chicago recently may just be a harbinger. It would be nice, therefore, if we could think straight about cause and effect. The immediate conventional wisdom was to blame the disturbance on the "toxic climate" created by Trump.
NEWS
October 8, 2013
WITH THE pathetic state of the American government, I am surprised there wasn't an army of citizens trying to take over the capital, so the people's lives can be addressed! All of these politicians have forgotten about the people. What good is health care when you have no jobs, no way to eat, no way to respect oneself, no way to live? Everyone, including the president, is out of touch with the people, who are suffering untold misery in this economic "depression" that they say we don't have.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - Tunisia's ruling Islamist party rejected Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali's offer to dissolve the government Thursday, a day after the assassination of an opposition leader sent waves of anger rippling through the North African country and left the government scrambling to contain the fallout. The challenge put forward by the moderate Islamist Ennahda party has amplified the potential for a political crisis in Tunisia. Chokri Belaid, a leader of the leftist Popular Front alliance and an outspoken critic of Tunisia's government, was shot dead outside his home Wednesday, a day after he received the latest in a string of death threats and called for a national conference on political violence.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lehigh University professor Chaim Kaufmann wants his students to think like terrorists. Even more, he wants them to plan like terrorists, try to understand their motives, and reason through their challenges. It's part of an unusual and engaging assignment in which freshmen in his class on political violence and terrorism are asked to weigh risk and feasibility by spending one class period mapping out a fictional attack - on their own university. "We use Lehigh as the target because that's what students know," said Kaufmann, 52, an associate professor in international relations at Lehigh, in Bethlehem, Pa. To learn best about why terrorism occurs, Kaufmann said, "you've got to do the thing that is uncomfortable for most of us to do most of the time . . . put aside our interests and socializations as Americans . . . and get inside the heads of the attackers and try to figure out what they are thinking.
NEWS
January 14, 2011
POLITICAL violence comes from one direction - the right. Guns at political rallies, threats, vandalism - all right-wing. Conservatives believe that if you disagree with them, they have the right to kill you. That's not freedom, that's fascism. For all those who say it comes from both sides, tell me when is the last time a liberal shot somebody? James Morton Philadelphia
NEWS
January 7, 2011
AS A ONCE-loyal Tastykake fan, I want to thank you for shining light on some of the problems of the Tasty Baking Co. My brother recently retired from Tasty after working there for 35 years. At the time he left, seven months ago, Tasty did not have a union, so nobody can say that this is another example of high union wages ruining a company. Should Tasty suffer a downfall, only company mismanagement can be blamed. Pictures show that quality control is no longer a priority of the company.
NEWS
June 25, 2009 | By Emad Al-shara
A recent spate of attacks largely directed at Baghdad's Shia neighborhoods is fueling concerns that sectarian and political violence may be returning to the city. Residents are especially worried, given that American forces are to withdraw from Iraqi cities by next week. Shias haven't been the only victims. Car bombings have also occurred recently in the Dora district, which is predominantly Sunni. But some fear that the high number of incidents aimed at Shia targets indicates that sectarian and political violence is on the rise.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Paul Greengrass was at work in London, putting together Bloody Sunday - his dramatization of the 1972 Northern Ireland protest that led to a civilian massacre by British troops - when he got a call telling him to switch on the television. "I was in the cutting room, and a reporter friend of mine phoned up," the director says. "He said, 'A plane just hit the World Trade Center.' Like everybody else, I thought I was looking at a major civil aviation disaster. And then, of course, the second plane hit. " Then a commercial airliner struck the Pentagon, and another crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pa., killing all on board.
NEWS
August 4, 2005 | By Leila Fadel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Scores of assassinations have marred the relative peace and prosperity of Iraq's southern port of Basra, a city near the Iranian border that is dominated by Shiite Muslims and has been spared the extreme violence of Baghdad. The assassins have targeted mostly men who are thought to have been connected to Saddam Hussein's Baath Party, which was dominated by Sunni Muslims. About 950 people have been killed since Hussein's regime was toppled in April 2003, according to Majid al-Sari, the Defense Ministry adviser for the southern region.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the last seven years, Liberian refugee Tommy O. Tarr has tried to shut the door on the nightmare that drove him out of his homeland: the bloody civil war that left 150,000 dead, created untold numbers of orphans and widows, and displaced half of the population. He mourned for his only child, a 14-year-old son killed during the war, and his wife, who disappeared amid the chaos. He watched in despair from afar as his country remained racked by political and ethnic violence and corruption, even after the war ended in 1997.
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