CollectionsPoliticians
IN THE NEWS

Politicians

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 22, 1986
Lewis H. Lapham's Dec. 13 Op-ed Page column, "Surviving the White House follies," was the best yet. It was also good for a few laughs - especially the closing line "On watching Reagan's bungling geopoliticians wander in and out of press conferences . . . at least it's reassuring that they didn't choose to become airline pilots or water engineers or surgeons. " Marilyn Fusfield Doylestown.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | By Rachel Simon
I have been wondering whom to invite to my Halloween party. Of course, I'll ask the usual passel of friends. But I want this year to be different. Special. Full of VIPs. So since I think and write about them all the time, I am writing up an invitation to the stars of our system, our wise and worldly politicians in that great pulsing hub of Washington. My only problem is, I can't see them doing Halloween. Sure, it's possible that they're not so different from the rest of us. Maybe those who have kids stock up on chocolates and jawbreakers, escort their kids around a familiar neighborhood, or take them to parties where everyone eats too much candy corn and the adults muse over the good old days of knocking on doors and saying, "Trick or treat!"
NEWS
September 8, 1992 | by Glenn Garvin, From the New York Times
As Hurricane Andrew gave its final shriek and retreated into the Everglades last week I knew we were really in trouble. Within minutes my worst fears were realized. The tiny screen of my battery- powered TV overflowed with the unctuous faces of politicians taking credit and assigning blame, promising and demanding comfort. The particulars varied but there were a few constant themes: Someone else should have predicted the hurricane earlier, prepared for it better, provided more aid for its victims.
NEWS
December 25, 2011
Václav Havel was past president of the Czech Republic, and the author of 21 plays and the essays "The Power of the Powerless," "Living in Truth," and "The Art of the Impossible. " He wrote this essay in 1998. He died Monday/ Does an intellectual - by virtue of his efforts to get beneath the surface of things, to grasp relations, causes, and effects, to recognize individual items as part of larger entities, and thus to derive a deeper awareness of and responsibility for the world - belong in politics?
NEWS
December 20, 1993 | by Thomas E. Patterson, From the New York Times
In his interview with Rolling Stone, Bill Clinton exploded at the claim that he had not honored his commitments. "I have fought more damn battles here for more things than any president in 20 years with the possible exception of Reagan's first budget and not gotten one damn bit of credit from the knee-jerk liberal press. I am damn sick and tired of it. " To the press, the outburst was the self-indulgent grousing of a thin- skinned politician. But Clinton was right that the press has been overly negative.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writer Roger Cohn contributed to this article.)
Former state Sen. James R. Lloyd Jr., named this week as Gov. Casey's adviser on eastern Pennsylvania matters, said that one of his tasks was to smooth relations with local politicians. So far, the appointment has had just the opposite effect. "This thing with Jim Lloyd upset the whole city," one Philadelphia Democratic leader said yesterday, asking not to be named. "Some of our guys don't even know him or like him, and nobody was consulted. Not even the mayor was called in on it. " Mayor Goode could not be reached for comment yesterday.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Northwest Summit convenes this weekend at Chestnut Hill College, it will bring together community leaders from neighborhoods poor and affluent, black and white and mixed in a search for creative solutions to problems that recognize no boundaries. The problems include crime, drugs and cutbacks in city services - issues that summit organizers say demand prompt and coordinated attention. "We call it a summit because at a summit you take care of business," said Horace Small, Northwest director of the Philadelphia Anti-Drug/Anti-Violence Network, one of the organizers of the event.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The winds have yet to blow. The rain has yet to pour. But this fall, the threat of a powerful wallop from El Nino hangs like a rare storm cloud over the perpetually sunny skies of Southern California. Constant publicity about the unpredictable worldwide weather phenomenon has brought big business to West Coast insurance agents, who are writing out flood insurance policies by the thousands every day. It's also been a boon for politicians, who have been quick to position themselves as defenders against the deluge.
NEWS
October 1, 2010
IFOR ONE AM a proud senior citizen. I've seen many come and many go. I say we need term limits to any elected office. Some of these geezers are like fixtures on the wall. Two terms and hit the road. We need some young blood in office to represent the taxpayers. Vote the bums out, the people must push for this resolution. Pat Panichelli, Philadelphia
NEWS
January 26, 2004 | By Walter Cronkite
We're in for nine solid months of politics. There will be moments in those months when our attention will be drawn to events that seem to be divorced from politics. Don't let them fool you! Almost every important pronouncement defending old policies or projecting new programs that comes out of the White House will have been studied, restudied, vetted and revetted to assess its effect on the November election. So will statements from the Democratic side. If we, the voters, react as we have in most of our past elections, there will be a not inconsiderable amount of grousing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2016
ISSUE | ETHICS Gifts come with a cost The late Gov. Bob Casey had a rule: No gifts could be taken by staff. Period. This bright line seemed rigid, but it made life simpler and avoided any appearance of impropriety. Once you allow officials to accept even modest gifts, it can be a slippery slope to more serious gifts and conflicts ("How D.A. nabbed Eagles passes," Sunday). It is easy for public officials, most working hard and foregoing private-sector income, to feel entitled to perks.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
She was just one happy face among the 1,400 upbeat people packed into West Philadelphia High School's gym last Tuesday to hear Hillary Clinton campaign for president. But State Rep. Vanessa Lowery Brown looked as if she were having an especially great day in the front row of that rally. Later, Brown posted on Facebook a photo of her and Clinton flashing broad smiles together. I saw it and I wondered, why is Brown smiling? Context, I decided, was the source of her joy. Brown, a Democrat who has represented a district covering parts of West Philadelphia and Fairmount Park since 2009, is awaiting trial on charges of bribery, conspiracy, and other corruption counts.
NEWS
August 16, 2016
THE FRATERNAL Order of Police cannot condone politicians that violate the law. The FOP has backed Gov. Wolf, Attorney General Kathleen Kane and Mayor Jim Kenney. All of them support Sanctuary Cites for illegals, felons and terrorists. The FOP has to take on these politicians who support a policy that puts police officers in harm's way. The City of Brotherly Love for felons and the home of the Sanctuary City policy must stop. The Democratic Party cannot condone a policy that puts police officers in danger and law-abiding citizens in harm's way. The FOP cannot keep endorsing politicians who do not obey the law. FOP President John McNesby, you need to stand up against Kenney's felon policy.
NEWS
August 11, 2016
An FBI raid of the home and offices of electricians Local 98 boss John J. "Johnny Doc" Dougherty doesn't mean he is guilty of anything. But the fact that the Justice Department keeps finding reason to investigate a union leader with strong ties to powerful elected officials is more than a bit unsettling in a city that only weeks ago saw a congressman convicted of corruption. Federal agents similarly searched Dougherty's home 10 years ago in trying to determine the source of mysterious bank deposits that they said suggested "an effort to conceal financial dealings.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
Republican politicians face a choice. They can accept Hillary Clinton's invitation to abandon Donald Trump and prevent a redefinition of their party as a haven for bigotry. Or they can prop Trump up, try to maximize his vote - and thereby tarnish themselves for a generation. If there were any doubts about Trump's disqualifying lack of simple decency and empathy, he resolved them in an interview on ABC News over the weekend with a characteristically cruel and self-centered attack on Khizr and Ghazala Khan, the American Muslim couple whose son, Army Capt.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
WHEN REP. Chaka Fattah was indicted last year, he expressed confidence that he would re-elected to the Second District seat he has held since 1995. "We'll have to live with the judgment they make," Fattah said, referring to voters in his district, but he reminded everyone that the voters had returned him to Congress again and again since 1995. The voters in the Second did make their judgment in the April 26 Democratic primary. It went against Fattah. He lost, by a wide margin, to state Rep. Dwight Evans.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, and Katie McGinty, candidate in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate, joined local union and political leaders Wednesday in opposing a turnaround plan for an elementary school in North Philadelphia. "If you didn't know the school was slated for essentially a destabilizing turnaround, you would never have known that by walking through the school," Weingarten said after an hour-long tour of E.W. Rhodes Elementary School.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
A CITY COUNCIL committee slammed shut a door that had been closed five years earlier. At first glance, a bill to ban the sale of dogs raised in puppy mills seems to duplicate a law enacted in 2011, but bill sponsor Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, a self-described "animal lover," said it was designed to "close a loophole. " Vincent Medley, executive director of the Animal Care and Control Team, the city's animal shelter, told Council's Committee on Licenses and Inspections that as far as he knew, no Philadelphia pet stores were selling puppy-mill dogs.
NEWS
March 15, 2016
AS A PHILADELPHIA resident who has made a deliberate decision to bypass Mayor Nutter's $2 cigarette tax. I will do the same for Mayor Kennry's soda tax. I do not drink coffee, so I get my daily caffeine via Moutain Dew. I was happy that tax-them-to-death Nutter was gone for good, only to have his clone follow him with the same madness. If I'm willing to go to the outlying counties to purchase my cigarettes, I'll do the same for my caffeine, as will other residents. What will the next step be - fine us if we don't give in to the madness?
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
In the second meeting in as many days on Philadelphia's ever-present problem of gun violence, a group of clerical and civic leaders concluded that stopping young men from arming themselves and shooting themselves and others has no easy solutions. "We are in a war, a real war, where casualties are every day in our community," Kenny Gamble, the Grammy-winning record producer and developer, who has focused his attention on the South Philadelphia neighborhood of his birth, said Tuesday during a faith-based roundtable discussion at City Hall.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|