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NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton waits to hear what they have to say about health care before he proposes action. House Speaker Newt Gingrich wants to hear their opinions about the budget. They are not lawmakers or lobbyists or scholars. They do not meet in the U.S. Capitol. Or the White House. They sit in plain rooms behind nondescript storefronts in suburban strip shopping malls across the country. The only observers are people watching from behind two-way mirrors, and clients who pay to read a written summary or watch a videotape.
NEWS
September 8, 2004 | By Frank Diamond
Hats off to politicians. You're probably now bracing for an angry or sarcastic follow-up. Labor Day has come and gone, and this is, after all, a presidential election year, what is sometimes referred to as "the silly season. " So you can be excused for asking, "Where's the punch line?" But I mean it. One of my visceral reactions to reading biographies of modern politicians is: "Who would put themselves through that?" Who would suffer the calumny and libel? Who would allow themselves to become the focus of millions who just need a scapegoat for whatever is not going right in their lives?
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | By MICHAEL KINSLEY
Everyone can agree that congressional check-kiting and related scandals, though small matters in themselves, are symbolic. We just might disagree symbolic about what. The general diagnosis is that members of Congress dwell in an inside-the-beltway cocoon of special privileges, isolated from the concerns of the real world. The fact that they can't keep their accounts in order is taken as a metaphor for the mess they've made of the government budget. It's a metaphor, all right. My favorite aspect of the story is the hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid bills at the House restaurant.
NEWS
February 22, 1999
What does it cost to run an effective political campaign nowadays? Judging by just the mayor's race, millions of dollars. Running for municipal court is a six-figure proposition. Council races won't be cheap. And those are just the local elections. Who owns the politicians we elect, given that they have to rely so heavily on donations to run for office? Wouldn't you want to know? In the proposed state budget being hammered out in Harrisburg is a small provision that would make it easier for the public to find out what a lobbyist gave a politician.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Outback, a buffalo herder snarls. Politicians? "I don't like any of them," he says. In Surfers Paradise on Australia's Gold Coast, a real estate man shakes his head. "People just don't trust them any longer," he says. In Humpty Doo outside of Darwin, a buffalo catcher is not coy about his opinion of politicians. "I've never got a straight answer from any I've met," he says. In Brisbane, a politician named Michael Macklin says such critics are too kind.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | BY MOLLY IVINS
My favorite new trend in political analysis is the one that holds there's nothing wrong with the political system, it's the voters who are a mess! Amazing news, huh? Here we've been laboring along in the boonies thinking something is screwy in Washington - just because Congress couldn't pass a health-care bill, barely passed a crime bill and killed off legislation to clean up its own hockdom to the lobbyists - when, lo, comes word that all is well in this great nation, it's just the stupid, cranky voters who don't realize it. But now that I'm accustomed to the idea, sure, I see that it's the people who are to blame, not the politicians.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By DAVID S. BRODER
A few years ago, Doris Kearns Goodwin, the biographer of Lyndon Johnson and the Kennedys, told a group of reporters at the American Press Institute a story that should be drilled into the consciousness of every journalist and politician in this country. When she was working with Johnson on his memoirs, Goodwin said, she summoned the courage one day to ask him why he had so often told people that his grandfather had died at the Alamo, when he knew it was not true. Johnson, she said, confessed to the fraud, but had a ready explanation.
NEWS
July 11, 2003 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whether it's for small-time shakedowns or big-time graft, New Jersey is running up a reputation these days for having more jail-bound politicians than exits on the New Jersey Turnpike. Christopher J. Christie is part of the reason. As the state's top federal law enforcement official, he has declared war on crooked politicians. In the 18 months since he became U.S. attorney, about two dozen Republican and Democratic political figures have been indicted or convicted. Now Christie is overseeing a grand jury investigation into the private billboard dealings of two former top officials in the McGreevey administration.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eulogies for William H. Gray III, the minister and former congressman who died last Monday, will pay tribute to his fight against apartheid, his rise to majority whip in the U.S. House of Representatives, his service as head of the United Negro College Fund. But in the Philadelphia political world, Gray may be best memorialized as the pillar of a group of independent black activists who emerged from outside the Democratic Party structure to gain unprecedented power and spawned a generation of political and civic leaders.
NEWS
October 29, 2001 | By Kevin Walker
I realize the events of Sept. 11 have turned the world on its head. Still, there is something terribly wrong when a resident of our region can send a peace missive to Saddam Hussein and receive a prompt and "genuine" response from the Iraqi president ("E-mail of peace gets reply from Iraq," Oct. 22), and I can't even get my elected representatives to acknowledge my letters with a perfunctory postcard. Jon S. Corzine spent $65 million on a U.S. Senate seat, but he won't blow a 34-cent stamp on me. And he isn't alone.
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