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NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fans and foes of Bill Spingler agree on at least one thing. "He was able to get things done," said Delaware County Democratic Chairman David Landau, an admirer of the longtime county Democratic political figure. "When he wanted to get something done, he got it done," said Sara Pilling, a recently acquired adversary. She fought Spingler, then president of the Radnor Township Board of Commissioners, on a plan approved last week for new dormitories for Villanova University, Spingler's alma mater.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The financial team backing Gov. Christie's presidential run includes Hewlett-Packard CEO Meg Whitman and billionaire hedge-fund manager Steven Cohen, according to a list released by Christie's campaign Wednesday. The campaign announced more than 80 names of individuals and couples serving on Christie's national finance leadership team. In addition to Whitman and Cohen - the chairman of Point 72 Asset Management, whose SAC Capital hedge-fund firm pleaded guilty to insider-trading charges in 2013 - the list of cochairs includes U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania and Tom Foley, a Republican from Connecticut whom Christie supported in an unsuccessful bid for governor of that state last year.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony "Tony" Fulwood, 72, a longtime police officer and bodyguard for Mayor Frank Rizzo and other politicians who was remembered as a "gentle giant," died Wednesday at his home in Wynnefield after a seven-year battle with multiple myeloma. About 6-foot-5 and close to 300 pounds, Mr. Fulwood cut a formidable figure. But his wife, Saundra Haines-Fulwood, 67, said he was a "gentle giant" who would "give you the shirt off his back. " Mr. Fulwood lived for his work, she said, which included being a bodyguard for former Philadelphia District Attorney Ron Castille - who performed their wedding in 2009 - and Castille's successor, Lynne Abraham.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY PETER ORSZAG
YOUNG PEOPLE are disaffected with the political process and lack any interest in running for office, a new book by Jennifer Lawless, of American University, and Richard Fox, of Loyola Marymount University, demonstrates. Yet the book itself perhaps unintentionally underscores one of the key reasons why: We know too much about our politicians. There are 519,682 elected officials in the U.S., the authors note, the vast majority of whom hold local jobs; they are mayors, city councillors, school-board members, coroners or recorders of deeds.
NEWS
April 22, 2015
IF YOU ARE still feeling poor, even though the recession is over, it is not your imagination. Most people are poorer today than before the economic downturn, when their incomes are adjusted for inflation. Although income has grown in Pennsylvania since the recession, most of it has gone to a tiny sliver of the population: the top 1 percent of earners. Their average income was nearly $1.1 million a year as of 2012, the latest year of data available used in a recent study by the Economic Analysis and Research Network.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
IN A SHOW of solidarity, interdenominational clergy and elected officials gathered yesterday at the Masjidullah Mosque in East Mount Airy to denounce the anti-Muslim advertisements that have stirred controversy since a federal judge last month ordered SEPTA to run them on buses. "Communities need to stand together . . . when these ads on the bus happen, we are all diminished," said Nancy Kreimer, with the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote. "Every one of us who is a citizen of this city is diminished by having hate ride on our buses.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter M. Phillips Jr., 76, a tireless prosecutor whose efforts to root out public corruption in the 1970s shook the foundations of Philadelphia's Democratic politics, died Saturday, Feb. 7, of complications from earlier open-heart surgery. His career as a city, state, and federal prosecutor pitted him against New York mobsters and politicians such as former Pennsylvania State Sen. Henry J. "Buddy" Cianfrani. His drive to pursue graft at all costs at times laid him low, such as when he turned his investigative zeal on officials close to the administration that appointed him - and later fired him - as a state special prosecutor charged with rooting out police and political corruption in the city.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
NOW VACCINATION is a political issue? It bubbled beneath the surface before New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie injected himself into it with an off-hand (and later walked-back) remark about inoculations. But after Big Boy mentioned it, the floodgates of cable TV, Twitter and Facebook swung open. As a public-health issue degenerates into a political issue, I'm here to sort a few things out. (Spoiler alert! I am pro-vaccination.) When I was in elementary school (and leeches were used by doctors)
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - When Gov.-elect Tom Wolf heads to New York City on Friday for the annual wining, dining, and networking extravaganza known as the Pennsylvania Society, he will be the man saying No-Thank-You in the land of Thank-You-Very-Much. With many high-profile staff and cabinet positions yet to fill, Wolf will be a main attraction as he joins scores of officials, lobbyists, and political strategists at cocktail receptions and parties hosted by the well-heeled and well-connected.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I WENT ON an informal meet-and-greet of young leaders in the city this summer. First stop was a dynamic group of young black men who were doing all kinds of grassroots work in their neighborhoods. Among them, Anton Moore, who founded a local nonprofit called Unity in the Community to help unify his South Philadelphia neighborhood, and Alex Peay, who heads another nonprofit called Rising Sons, an after-school program to help young black men succeed. Next were the irrepressible Doley sisters, Emaleigh and Aine.
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