CollectionsPolitics
IN THE NEWS

Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. recalls a curious child with a seat at the table as the grown-ups in West Philadelphia plotted campaigns for political office independent of the Democratic machine. Anthony H. Williams was there in the late 1960s and early 1970s because his father, Hardy Williams, was a chief plotter. "He always appeared more mature than his age," Goode said of the younger Williams. "Little Tony, as we called him, was always around and always interested in what we were doing.
NEWS
August 4, 2000
You do have to hand it to them. The chutzpah is breathtaking. Republican deliverers of The Message this week in Philadelphia have taken to weaving the phrase "the politics of personal destruction" into their patter. This, in their pitch, refers to the pugnacity of Al Gore, as typified by the Democrats' avid, immediate attacks on Dick Cheney's voting record. Rarely does hypocrisy reach such a distilled essence. Let's be clear about several things. Ad hominem venom is indeed a stubborn virus in our politics.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
BLACKS ARE voting for Obama. Women for Clinton. Republicans would vote for a moose if it were a Republican. Does anyone vote with their heads? How stupid the public is. Take McCain. He plays on being a POW. That doesn't make him a hero. I was in Vietnam. I don't sit and preach about it. He wants us to stay in Iraq. Anyone who is still with Bush has to be an idiot. The talk-show guys are the best - what robots! Rich Colaianni, Blackwood, N.J.
NEWS
January 26, 2000
Bowing to public outcry and the dictates of the state Constitution, Frank Serafini, convicted perjurer, will at long last resign from the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. You'd like to think that makes the score: The People 1, Politics, 0. But he did hang around long enough to meet the Republican Party's tactical goal of delaying a special election until after the April 4 primary. So maybe the real score, sadly, remains: Politics 1, the Constitution 0.
NEWS
October 3, 1987
Edgar C. Campbell, ward leader, clerk of Quarter Sessions Court and former city councilman who died Wednesday at 84, was known as the dean of black politics in Philadelphia. He was a soft-spoken man who lived and survived in the fickle world of politics in a career that spanned six decades by following a political philosophy that your word was your bond. He wore the mantle of dean easily and well. He was often sought out by party leaders and younger politicians of all races and ethnic origin who wanted his advice and support.
NEWS
October 12, 2006
BARBRA STREISAND sang at the Wachovia Center the other night to a sellout crowd. Barbra also politicked, using an actor portraying the president, about her dislike for our president. She has the right to do that, but what strikes me is the fact that many, if not most, of our Hollywood types seem to think that, because they have our attention while on stage, that makes them smarter than the rest of us and gives them the mission of preaching their holier-than-thou politics to us. People spent a lot of money to attend Barbra's concert because Barbra is one of the finest singers on this earth.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | BY ANDREW KIMBRELL, from the New York Times
In recent years many men have begun to realize that for them and their father's generation, the necessities of work and career and the rising divorce rate have eroded their relationship to family, community and the natural world. This frustration and alienation has led an increasing number of men to gather in a loosely organized men's movement. Most commentators don't seem to know how to react to this movement. The poet Robert Bly's best-selling book "Iron John" has encouraged thousands of men to venture into wilderness retreats to rediscover the mythic dimensions of masculinity.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
WE NEED election reform, and we need it fast! Not tomorrow, not the next day, but right now. We need laws that have teeth. We want to know what you are going to do for us, not what the other guy did or didn't do. Talk about yourself, and your plans, not what your opponent does (or what you'd have us believe he or she did). Let him or her tell us what their plans are, not what you think they are. Tell us what your agenda is, and don't tell us what your opponent is going to do or not do. Anyone who talks trash about his or her opponent should be immediately banned from further campaigning.
NEWS
July 27, 1993
So you're wondering, how can anybody argue for appointing judges when the mayor's wife - among a dozen politically connected lawyers and judges - is nominated for a seat on the federal court in Philadelphia? Fact is, the appointment of federal judges - while it often yields high- quality candidates (like corporate lawyer and, now, U.S. District Judge- nominee Marjorie O. Rendell) - is really a political selection process. A U.S. senator - in this case, Sen. Harris Wofford - names a committee to come up with names.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WOMEN IN POWER: THE SECRETS OF LEADERSHIP Nonfiction. By Dorothy W. Cantor and Toni Bernay with Jean Stoess Houghton Mifflin. $21.95 Women in Power, a revealing psychological portrait of how women have struggled to share the political spotlight in this country, could not have been written at a better time. Already, with Carol Moseley Braun's upset victory in last month's Democratic Senate primary in Illinois, 1992 is being proclaimed the Year of the Woman in national politics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On May 23, 2003, I attended the Baghdad news conference at which the U.S. viceroy, Paul Bremer, announced he was dissolving the Iraqi army. I thought of that day when I read of Wednesday's confrontation between 19-year-old student Ivy Dietrich and Jeb Bush, who had been blaming President Obama for the rise of the jihadis. She told the former Florida governor, "Your brother created ISIS. " Dietrich's claim was a bit too blunt but still right on the money. It should serve as a warning to 2016 presidential contenders: Using the Iraq war as a political club against the opposition can boomerang.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY PETER ORSZAG
YOUNG PEOPLE are disaffected with the political process and lack any interest in running for office, a new book by Jennifer Lawless, of American University, and Richard Fox, of Loyola Marymount University, demonstrates. Yet the book itself perhaps unintentionally underscores one of the key reasons why: We know too much about our politicians. There are 519,682 elected officials in the U.S., the authors note, the vast majority of whom hold local jobs; they are mayors, city councillors, school-board members, coroners or recorders of deeds.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. recalls a curious child with a seat at the table as the grown-ups in West Philadelphia plotted campaigns for political office independent of the Democratic machine. Anthony H. Williams was there in the late 1960s and early 1970s because his father, Hardy Williams, was a chief plotter. "He always appeared more mature than his age," Goode said of the younger Williams. "Little Tony, as we called him, was always around and always interested in what we were doing.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
THE POLLS and surveys tell you education is the issue that voters care about most in the mayor's race. But the streets tell a different story. Thousands of people have marched through Philadelphia recently - to protest the police killings of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Brandon Tate-Brown in Frankford and Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The outcry hasn't been just about the deaths - but for greater transparency in how police-involved shootings are investigated, and for bad cops to face meaningful discipline.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia prosecutor who is running for judge has agreed to pay a $300 ethics fine for raising money for her campaign while working for the city. Deborah Watson-Stokes, a lawyer in the District Attorney's Office from 1990 to February 2015, admitted she violated the City Charter by soliciting campaign funds and taking part in political activity on the job. On Thursday, she settled an Ethics Board complaint against her by agreeing to pay the fine. City rules prohibit most employees from fund-raising or taking part in political activity on the job. Watson-Stokes officially submitted her resignation Jan. 15 but continued to work in the District Attorney's Office until Feb. 6, the day when she had scheduled a joint retirement party and fund-raiser for her judicial campaign, the Ethics Board found.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Thursday named the dean of economics and finance at Claremont McKenna College in California as its next president. S. Brock Blomberg, 48, a political economist who studies terrorism, replaces Lucien "Terry" Winegar, who had been serving as interim president since Bobby Fong's death in September. Blomberg takes over July 1 as the 17th president of Ursinus, a 1,600-student liberal arts college in Collegeville. "Our objective was to discover someone who could embrace the Ursinus DNA, our values and what we are about, who is passionate about the liberal arts, and comes with highly regarded leadership experience," Michael Marcon, a college trustee and search committee chair, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
ALTHOUGH the first primaries of the 2016 election season are still months away, the IRS appears to be already gearing up to investigate churches that participate in politics. The Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative group based in Arizona, sued the IRS this week to learn more about the agency's election-year plans. The lawsuit alleges that the IRS is refusing to disclose details of an agreement it made with the Freedom From Religion Foundation, an atheist group, to enforce a law that would strip a church of its tax-exempt status if it were involved in obvious political activity.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | Christine M. Flowers, Daily News Columnist
IT'S POPULAR to say that age is just a number. I never understood that statement. Aside from being self-evident, the implication that age is irrelevant makes absolutely no sense. Age is a number that means a lot of things, including how much you have accomplished, experienced and, perhaps most importantly, the mistakes you've avoided making during a lifetime. But when we say "age is just a number," it's as if we're trying to minimize the negative perception of being "older. " I put that word in quotation marks because its connotation has evolved over recent decades.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sandy Grady, 87, a respected Philadelphia journalist acclaimed for his sportswriting who also covered politics and seven presidents, died Tuesday, April 14, in Reston, Va., after a long battle with kidney cancer. A native of Charlotte, N.C., Mr. Grady arrived in Philadelphia in 1957 to weave tales at the Philadelphia Daily News and then the Bulletin. Frank Bilovsky, a former Bulletin sportswriter, said of Mr. Grady: "He destroyed my 1950s stereotypical view of Southern white men as backward, right-wing bigots.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY A YOUNGSTER with the sounds of newspaper presses thundering in their dreams had one great wish: They wanted to be a Sandy Grady when they grew up. Sandy could mold a sentence into a work of art, no matter the subject, from boxing to the Olympics to baseball to the political scene, all of which he graced with a fluid style that never seemed to bump. Some of his memorable words still ring like a punch in the funny bone. He once wrote of an unpopular Eagles coach: "He couldn't sell iced tea to a Tasmanian at a dried-up water hole.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|