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NEWS
August 4, 2000
You do have to hand it to them. The chutzpah is breathtaking. Republican deliverers of The Message this week in Philadelphia have taken to weaving the phrase "the politics of personal destruction" into their patter. This, in their pitch, refers to the pugnacity of Al Gore, as typified by the Democrats' avid, immediate attacks on Dick Cheney's voting record. Rarely does hypocrisy reach such a distilled essence. Let's be clear about several things. Ad hominem venom is indeed a stubborn virus in our politics.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
BLACKS ARE voting for Obama. Women for Clinton. Republicans would vote for a moose if it were a Republican. Does anyone vote with their heads? How stupid the public is. Take McCain. He plays on being a POW. That doesn't make him a hero. I was in Vietnam. I don't sit and preach about it. He wants us to stay in Iraq. Anyone who is still with Bush has to be an idiot. The talk-show guys are the best - what robots! Rich Colaianni, Blackwood, N.J.
NEWS
January 26, 2000
Bowing to public outcry and the dictates of the state Constitution, Frank Serafini, convicted perjurer, will at long last resign from the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. You'd like to think that makes the score: The People 1, Politics, 0. But he did hang around long enough to meet the Republican Party's tactical goal of delaying a special election until after the April 4 primary. So maybe the real score, sadly, remains: Politics 1, the Constitution 0.
NEWS
October 3, 1987
Edgar C. Campbell, ward leader, clerk of Quarter Sessions Court and former city councilman who died Wednesday at 84, was known as the dean of black politics in Philadelphia. He was a soft-spoken man who lived and survived in the fickle world of politics in a career that spanned six decades by following a political philosophy that your word was your bond. He wore the mantle of dean easily and well. He was often sought out by party leaders and younger politicians of all races and ethnic origin who wanted his advice and support.
NEWS
October 12, 2006
BARBRA STREISAND sang at the Wachovia Center the other night to a sellout crowd. Barbra also politicked, using an actor portraying the president, about her dislike for our president. She has the right to do that, but what strikes me is the fact that many, if not most, of our Hollywood types seem to think that, because they have our attention while on stage, that makes them smarter than the rest of us and gives them the mission of preaching their holier-than-thou politics to us. People spent a lot of money to attend Barbra's concert because Barbra is one of the finest singers on this earth.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | BY ANDREW KIMBRELL, from the New York Times
In recent years many men have begun to realize that for them and their father's generation, the necessities of work and career and the rising divorce rate have eroded their relationship to family, community and the natural world. This frustration and alienation has led an increasing number of men to gather in a loosely organized men's movement. Most commentators don't seem to know how to react to this movement. The poet Robert Bly's best-selling book "Iron John" has encouraged thousands of men to venture into wilderness retreats to rediscover the mythic dimensions of masculinity.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
WE NEED election reform, and we need it fast! Not tomorrow, not the next day, but right now. We need laws that have teeth. We want to know what you are going to do for us, not what the other guy did or didn't do. Talk about yourself, and your plans, not what your opponent does (or what you'd have us believe he or she did). Let him or her tell us what their plans are, not what you think they are. Tell us what your agenda is, and don't tell us what your opponent is going to do or not do. Anyone who talks trash about his or her opponent should be immediately banned from further campaigning.
NEWS
July 27, 1993
So you're wondering, how can anybody argue for appointing judges when the mayor's wife - among a dozen politically connected lawyers and judges - is nominated for a seat on the federal court in Philadelphia? Fact is, the appointment of federal judges - while it often yields high- quality candidates (like corporate lawyer and, now, U.S. District Judge- nominee Marjorie O. Rendell) - is really a political selection process. A U.S. senator - in this case, Sen. Harris Wofford - names a committee to come up with names.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WOMEN IN POWER: THE SECRETS OF LEADERSHIP Nonfiction. By Dorothy W. Cantor and Toni Bernay with Jean Stoess Houghton Mifflin. $21.95 Women in Power, a revealing psychological portrait of how women have struggled to share the political spotlight in this country, could not have been written at a better time. Already, with Carol Moseley Braun's upset victory in last month's Democratic Senate primary in Illinois, 1992 is being proclaimed the Year of the Woman in national politics.
NEWS
August 6, 2002
Democratic colleagues of New Jersey Sen. Robert G. Torricelli were quick to minimize the significance of the Senate ethics committee's judgment of his misbehavior. "A relatively mild rebuke," pronounced fellow New Jersey Democrat Jon Corzine. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle announced that the "sensational" allegations against Mr. Torricelli had been "proven false and without foundation" - an imaginative reading that suggested itself to no one else. . . . Last week [Sen. Torricelli]
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NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin and Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writers
  On the epic finale of Empire , record mogul Lucious Lyon announced that performers - including Patti LaBelle, Rita Ora, and Snoop Dogg - would donate a percentage of their fees from a benefit concert to Black Lives Matter. It was another example of how - in the shadow of the deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of police officers, particularly in Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y. - current events have seeped into prime time. Television shows often exist in a world in which current events rarely have an effect on the plots.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Benjamin Netanyahu did a disservice to the U.S.-Israel alliance and the goal of preventing an Iranian bomb by his political grandstanding before Congress this week. If his real goal was to prevent Tehran from getting nukes (and not just to boost his reelection odds or trash President Obama), then he undercut it. Let me count the ways. First: By accepting a Republican invitation to address Congress issued behind Obama's back, the Israeli premier transformed a serious issue into a partisan slugfest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The name Margaret Cho instantly brings to mind hot-button political activism and outrageous first-person humor, things you'll find in equal measure during her shows at Helium Comedy Club on Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Whether as comedian, actress or author, Cho covers racism, feminism, abuse, LGBT empowerment, sexual liberation, corporate interference, bullying, and more. Her current stage show is titled "There's No 'I' in Team, but there is a 'Cho' in Psycho". She also has had a late-night talk show, All About Sex , which recently completed its first six-episode season on TLC, and documentaries such as Adventures in Comedy . Cho, 42, is still as passionate about stand-up comedy as she was when she first gained national attention in the early '90s for her frank takes on being young, bold, and Korean American.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Philadelphia fretted about the "brain drain" - college students leaving town as soon as their education ended. That trend has been reversed with millennials - those aged 20 to 34 - now representing the largest group of city residents. Millennials are everywhere - except at polling places on Election Day. The candidates for mayor know that and are trying to solve a political puzzle vexing campaigns across the country: How to get millennial voters, who previously have shown up in force only for historic events such as President Obama's 2008 election, to pay attention to local campaigns?
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Education may well be the issue that gets Philadelphia's next mayor elected. That fact is not lost on Stephanie Conaghan, a kindergarten teacher at Ziegler Elementary, a public school in Oxford Circle. So for the last several months, in addition to teaching 30 children, she's been learning about politics: volunteering at phone banks, signing her colleagues up to canvass neighborhoods for candidates she believes support education, and distributing voter-registration forms to parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The Germantown YWCA is nearing its 100th birthday, and the old gal isn't doing so well. The windows of the stately Georgian Revival residence hotel on Germantown Avenue are covered with plywood. Having suffered two fires, her brick walls are a bit wobbly, and there's a hole in the roof. Some would gladly put her out of her misery right now. But without the YWCA, Germantown wouldn't be Germantown. Though the YWCA is fondly remembered as a neighborhood hub, the place where everyone in Germantown learned to swim, it didn't get made a national landmark, or listed on the city and national historic registers, just for having a commodious pool.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Clearview Regional High School teacher Jenna Scott informed her students that U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R., N.J.) was coming to their Advanced Placement government and politics class, she told them to do their research and ask about something more than his life. They did, questioning the congressman on Monday on a variety of issues, including the plight of Atlantic City, the implications of the Patriot Act, and the future of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp for terror suspects.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | Solomon D. Leach, Daily News Staff Writer
BY DAY, RODNEY Oglesby represents the interests of the Philadelphia School District in Harrisburg and City Hall as government affairs director. By night, he's raising money as head of a political action committee with strong ties to the charter school movement. Oglesby's employer sees no conflict between the roles. "His activity with the PAC is in line with the [district] policy and what is allowed in the policy," district spokesman Fernando Gallard said yesterday, citing Section 315 of the district's employment policy which "recognizes and encourages the right of its employees as citizens to engage in political activity.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddie Campbell's four tours of duty as a Marine in Korea and Vietnam helped prepare him for the battles that confronted him in Willingboro nearly 30 years later. But there were still a few ambushes. Campbell became a councilman in the predominantly black suburb in 1998 and had to tackle the fallout from white flight, shrinking tax revenue, and spiraling foreclosures. He was first appointed to the governing body after his wife, Doreatha, died of cancer while serving as mayor of their adopted hometown.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a typical year, last week's announcement that Montgomery County Commissioner Leslie Richards would leave to become the state's next transportation secretary would qualify as a political bombshell. But 2015 is shaping up as anything but typical. Richards' departure brings the number of high-level elected vacancies in Montgomery to seven, unleashing a political feeding frenzy as dozens of prospective candidates swarm for the chance to run for commissioner, district attorney, judgeships, and row offices.
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