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NEWS
August 4, 2000
You do have to hand it to them. The chutzpah is breathtaking. Republican deliverers of The Message this week in Philadelphia have taken to weaving the phrase "the politics of personal destruction" into their patter. This, in their pitch, refers to the pugnacity of Al Gore, as typified by the Democrats' avid, immediate attacks on Dick Cheney's voting record. Rarely does hypocrisy reach such a distilled essence. Let's be clear about several things. Ad hominem venom is indeed a stubborn virus in our politics.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
BLACKS ARE voting for Obama. Women for Clinton. Republicans would vote for a moose if it were a Republican. Does anyone vote with their heads? How stupid the public is. Take McCain. He plays on being a POW. That doesn't make him a hero. I was in Vietnam. I don't sit and preach about it. He wants us to stay in Iraq. Anyone who is still with Bush has to be an idiot. The talk-show guys are the best - what robots! Rich Colaianni, Blackwood, N.J.
NEWS
January 26, 2000
Bowing to public outcry and the dictates of the state Constitution, Frank Serafini, convicted perjurer, will at long last resign from the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. You'd like to think that makes the score: The People 1, Politics, 0. But he did hang around long enough to meet the Republican Party's tactical goal of delaying a special election until after the April 4 primary. So maybe the real score, sadly, remains: Politics 1, the Constitution 0.
NEWS
October 3, 1987
Edgar C. Campbell, ward leader, clerk of Quarter Sessions Court and former city councilman who died Wednesday at 84, was known as the dean of black politics in Philadelphia. He was a soft-spoken man who lived and survived in the fickle world of politics in a career that spanned six decades by following a political philosophy that your word was your bond. He wore the mantle of dean easily and well. He was often sought out by party leaders and younger politicians of all races and ethnic origin who wanted his advice and support.
NEWS
October 12, 2006
BARBRA STREISAND sang at the Wachovia Center the other night to a sellout crowd. Barbra also politicked, using an actor portraying the president, about her dislike for our president. She has the right to do that, but what strikes me is the fact that many, if not most, of our Hollywood types seem to think that, because they have our attention while on stage, that makes them smarter than the rest of us and gives them the mission of preaching their holier-than-thou politics to us. People spent a lot of money to attend Barbra's concert because Barbra is one of the finest singers on this earth.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | BY ANDREW KIMBRELL, from the New York Times
In recent years many men have begun to realize that for them and their father's generation, the necessities of work and career and the rising divorce rate have eroded their relationship to family, community and the natural world. This frustration and alienation has led an increasing number of men to gather in a loosely organized men's movement. Most commentators don't seem to know how to react to this movement. The poet Robert Bly's best-selling book "Iron John" has encouraged thousands of men to venture into wilderness retreats to rediscover the mythic dimensions of masculinity.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
WE NEED election reform, and we need it fast! Not tomorrow, not the next day, but right now. We need laws that have teeth. We want to know what you are going to do for us, not what the other guy did or didn't do. Talk about yourself, and your plans, not what your opponent does (or what you'd have us believe he or she did). Let him or her tell us what their plans are, not what you think they are. Tell us what your agenda is, and don't tell us what your opponent is going to do or not do. Anyone who talks trash about his or her opponent should be immediately banned from further campaigning.
NEWS
July 27, 1993
So you're wondering, how can anybody argue for appointing judges when the mayor's wife - among a dozen politically connected lawyers and judges - is nominated for a seat on the federal court in Philadelphia? Fact is, the appointment of federal judges - while it often yields high- quality candidates (like corporate lawyer and, now, U.S. District Judge- nominee Marjorie O. Rendell) - is really a political selection process. A U.S. senator - in this case, Sen. Harris Wofford - names a committee to come up with names.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WOMEN IN POWER: THE SECRETS OF LEADERSHIP Nonfiction. By Dorothy W. Cantor and Toni Bernay with Jean Stoess Houghton Mifflin. $21.95 Women in Power, a revealing psychological portrait of how women have struggled to share the political spotlight in this country, could not have been written at a better time. Already, with Carol Moseley Braun's upset victory in last month's Democratic Senate primary in Illinois, 1992 is being proclaimed the Year of the Woman in national politics.
NEWS
August 6, 2002
Democratic colleagues of New Jersey Sen. Robert G. Torricelli were quick to minimize the significance of the Senate ethics committee's judgment of his misbehavior. "A relatively mild rebuke," pronounced fellow New Jersey Democrat Jon Corzine. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle announced that the "sensational" allegations against Mr. Torricelli had been "proven false and without foundation" - an imaginative reading that suggested itself to no one else. . . . Last week [Sen. Torricelli]
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A state legislative committee's investigation into last year's lane closures at the George Washington Bridge was a cover to "take down" Gov. Christie and boost the political career of its cochairman, GOP lawmakers charged in a new report Monday. Democrats on the New Jersey Legislative Select Committee on Investigation, led by Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski (D., Middlesex), "repeatedly misled the public; manipulated media coverage via false leads, seemingly unlawful leaks, and baseless claims; charged taxpayers millions of dollars to promote political fiction; and accomplished nothing meaningful for the public good," the 119-page report says.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
From the pork barrel to Pigasus - a hog nominated for president by the Yippies in 1968 - swine have served as an enduring American political metaphor. That's fitting given the outsize power of big agriculture, which extends even to this age of urbanization and our most urban state. Consider New Jersey's latest messy encounter with pork policy. Gov. Christie recently vetoed a bill banning the use of so-called gestation crates, which large hog farms use to cruelly confine pregnant sows so closely that they can't turn around.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It's a neat trick. Fulfill retrograde girlish fantasies (tall, handsome, rich prince whisks you away from your dreary chores and your lousy dresses), while also pandering to the demands of contemporary gender politics: offer empowerment, self-actualization, and any other politically correct goal on the current curriculum. And this touring production of the Broadway show Cinderella , at the Academy of Music for the Thanksgiving holiday week, adds to the PC effect with a veritable rainbow of actors in the ensemble.
NEWS
November 25, 2014
T RY TO THINK of a rise and fall in Pennsylvania politics as stunning or rapid as Kathleen Kane's. Got one? Yeah, me neither. A year ago, just 10 months in office, the state's first woman and first Democrat elected attorney general was being touted for governor or U.S. senator. These days she faces possible criminal charges amid rumors of resignation. Quite a fall. In 2013, she rocketed to national notice, elating her Democratic base. She closed a loophole to stop residents denied gun permits here from getting them from Florida.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
A PAIR OF LONGTIME political players, state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams and former District Attorney Lynne Abraham, entered the 2015 Democratic primary election for mayor yesterday to little surprise but great fanfare. Abraham, 73, went first, laying out a campaign platform of economic development, business-tax reform, public safety and improvements to education. "If you want a leader who . . . has the experience to get things done, the grit, the desire and the courage to break some china along the way and turn Philadelphia into a great American city, I am your candidate," Abraham told about 300 people at the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
November 17, 2014
WE LEARNED many new things at City Council's hearings on Philadelphia's energy future last week. Here's one: components of natural gas include propane, butane, methane . . . and here, in Philadelphia, civic pain. We're referring to the pain of listening to experts on Philadelphia's future as an energy hub and wondering why the city wasn't having these discussions years ago. And the pain of realizing that PGW's private ownership could be a key to the city's future as an energy hub, but Council killed that prospect just last week primarily because of "process" instead of the potential outcome for the city as a whole.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the hours after his arrest, Eric Frein allegedly told detectives that he ambushed a state police barracks in the Poconos because he wanted to "wake people up" about his concerns over the government. He also described his killing of a state police corporal as an "assassination," according to an updated list of charges filed in court late Thursday afternoon. He shot the corporal because "he wanted to make a change" in government and believed "that voting was insufficient to do so, because there was no one worth voting for," investigators wrote in the newly filed court records.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
So-called dark-money groups spent 27 percent more on this year's elections than they did in 2010, thanks to reckless Supreme Court decisions and regulatory failures allowing unlimited, undisclosed political contributions. The groups hide donors behind the tax code, disguising themselves as "social welfare" organizations. In fact, they are an increasingly powerful and poisonous political force. Analysts say they are just beginning to flex their muscles in preparation for the main event: the 2016 presidential election.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
TOM WOLF, a millionaire from York who distributes kitchen cabinets, did not win the race for governor of Pennsylvania yesterday. Gov. Corbett lost it. In 77 days, Wolf will be sworn in as the state's 47th governor, mostly because of political and policy decisions that Corbett made. Corbett last night conceded the race in Pittsburgh, saying that he stood by all those decisions even though they proved unpopular. "I said I may be a one-term governor. And I am," Corbett said.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He defended his Ebola quarantine policy on national television, lambasted President Obama's leadership as limited to "seven-minute lectures from the South Lawn," and supplied morning-show fodder by ordering a Hurricane Sandy protester to "sit down and shut up. " Gov. Christie spent last week in the national limelight, shrinking from neither criticism of his Ebola pronouncements by public health officials - "We're right and they were wrong," he...
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