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NEWS
July 27, 1991
You might have been startled by Mikhail S. Gorbachev's remarks at the opening of a meeting of the Communist Party's Central Committee. Gorbachev pretty much advocated abandonment of the party's central beliefs, especially the doctrines of Marx and Lenin. He sounded pretty much like a misplaced Swedish Social Democrat with a Russian accent. This has caused a great flap among people who think about such things. It is remarkable to see one of the world's major political movements announcing that it is abandoning what it believes in. In this country, of course, it is only the announcing that startles us. Our Democratic Party, grown plump on PAC contributions even though it can't win national elections, has given up on opposing anything the Republicans propose, no matter how crazy.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
Dorothy Storck professes to defend Nancy Reagan and her absence from the Icelandic summit by suggesting that not only can we not trust the Soviets, but their wives as well. "Cosmetics gap" indeed - more like Maybelline McCarthyism as Ms. Storck tries to come to grips with the reality that not all Soviet women are shuffling babushkas. While she's at it she colors Iceland as sort of climatic fellow-traveler with a deliberately inhospitable climate suited more to corn-fed Reds and so apologizes for the more temperately accustomed Nancy Reagan.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Bruce Cockburn's a word man. The 46-year-old Canadian singer plays a fine, bristling guitar, but music nearly always seems secondary to lyrics in the conception of his songs. When he has something to get his dander up, that's fine. Cockburn's world view is more thought-through than any politically minded pop songsmith this side of Billy Bragg, and nearly all of the gripping moments at the Keswick Theater Thursday night came when he was looking injustice in the eye, and seething.
NEWS
May 16, 2005 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Consider Christianity. It is a faith broad enough to encompass everything from a pope in Rome to a missionary in South America to a snake handler in Appalachia. Apparently, however, it is not broad enough to encompass a Democrat in North Carolina. That, at least, is the inference to be gleaned from the experience of nine people who say they were kicked out of their church last week because they voted for John Kerry in the 2004 election. The nine former members of East Waynesville Baptist say the Rev. Chan Chandler led the drive to oust them.
NEWS
May 5, 1987
Did Gary Hart spend much of last weekend in his Capitol Hill townhouse with a young blonde woman while his wife was in Denver? If he did, what (if anything) does that tell us about whether he should be president? Historically, Americans have been ambivalent about the sexual conduct of public figures. Grover Cleveland, for example, was elected to the presidency despite the disclosure that he had fathered an illegitimate child. The reputation of John F. Kennedy has been besmirched but hardly destroyed by revelations - after his death - regarding his extramarital amorous adventures.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
After an unsuccessful attempt to rock the party leadership, Stanley A. Casacio has decided to run for re-election as Ward 2 commissioner in Cheltenham Township after all. He will face Kenneth A. Kind, a lawyer who is national marketing director for Resource America, a Center City energy company. Kind won the Democrats' endorsement late last week. Casacio had set his sights on fellow Republican David Webb, who for 10 years has been the township finance director. But Casacio did not have the votes in the party leadership, and Webb won overwhelming endorsement for the May 16 primary.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | By Karen Akerlof, Special to The Inquirer
Six Rosemont College alumnae, speaking at a panel discussion on "Women in Politics," told an audience at the college Saturday that despite continuing sexism, politics is gradually opening up to women. "We have gotten over the hump of women's liberation. We can't say that (sexism) isn't there, but we can deal with it," said Tracey Massey, Tredyffrin Township supervisor. "I think that we sometimes have trouble being taken seriously," said Patricia Dohrenwend, town clerk in Eastchester, N.Y., arguing that woman face fewer problems with sexism as candidates than they do as office-holders.
NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Ever since he lost his reelection bid to Christie Whitman in 1993 in a wave of voter disaffection over the state income tax, former New Jersey Gov. Jim Florio has kept a low political profile. In the ensuing years, he founded a Morristown-based company called Xspand Inc., where he is chairman and CEO, that helps local governments manage and collect on tax liens. The company recently was sold to the investment banking firm of Bear Stearns & Co. Florio briefly ventured back into electoral politics in 2000, when he ran unsuccessfully against Jon S. Corzine for the New Jersey Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate.
NEWS
June 15, 2000
There was a time when broadcasters leaped at the chance to serve as unofficial hosts of the presidential campaign. It was a way to earn their spurs as newscasters; to make household names out of their anchors and reporters; to inform their viewers; to serve the public interest. Now they view politics as a burden, a bore, a "sad show. " At local stations, it's now the ad sales manager, not the news director, who operates the only political desk on the premises. The Feb. 28 issue of Broadcasting & Cable magazine nicely captured the Gilded Age mindset of broadcasters toward politics.
NEWS
December 27, 1993 | by Edmund White, From the New York Times
The new Performing Arts Centre in Toronto opened this fall with a revival of Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein's "Showboat. " The opening was stormy because of a picket line of protesters, who felt the musical denigrated blacks. In October the producers flew in the eminent black American historian Henry Louis Gates Jr., who attempted in a lecture to place the musical in historical context. Some critics responded with indignation at what they saw as a typical display of American imperialism.
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