CollectionsPolitics
IN THE NEWS

Politics

NEWS
May 30, 2016
Joseph M. Knippenberg is professor of politics at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta Earlier this month, when she announced that the Obama administration was filing a lawsuit against North Carolina over its "bathroom bill," Attorney General Loretta Lynch traversed a significant portion of the history of political philosophy within a few short paragraphs. I'm quite confident that she didn't mean to do so, but she raised a number of issues that offer us the opportunity to get beyond the controversies of the moment and examine some of the deeper reasons for our current predicament.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Playing politics with teachers' seniority The campaign by Republican legislators in Pennsylvania to have teacher effectiveness replace seniority in determining layoffs is eerily similar to their campaign to require voter identification ("GOP ties teacher bill to budget," Wednesday). Both efforts seemed aimed at groups that tend to vote Democratic. It is also ironic that Republicans, who decry the size and reach of government, are, through this legislation, inserting themselves into the affairs and collective-bargaining relationships of hundreds of local school districts.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Lucy Horton says she could scarcely believe her ears. Hours after she had called Delran's mayor Ken Paris "unprofessional and unethical" on her Facebook page, a township police sergeant was on the phone, "informing me that if I didn't take the Facebook post down, the mayor would be pressing harassment charges. " Paris, a two-term mayor seeking reelection this year, denies that he ordered the call. But it was the talk of the town this week. The incident went small-town viral because Horton not only refused to take down the post, she posted a new message describing the alleged police call, and denouncing Paris again.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Defense lawyers lit into U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's hired political gun Thursday in a dogged cross-examination of the man who has emerged as a key witness in the government's racketeering conspiracy case. It remains to be seen whether their attacks on Thomas Lindenfeld, the chief strategist behind Fattah's failed 2007 mayoral bid, were enough to sway the federal jury weighing the fates of the congressman and his four codefendants. In six hours of testimony, Lindenfeld parsed words with the smoothness of a man who had spent the last three decades working in Washington politics.
NEWS
May 20, 2016
It's beyond frustrating to watch Pennsylvania politicians satisfy their penchant for partisan mud fights while failing to resolve the funding and accountability issues keeping public schools in distress. Both Democrats and Republicans propose ideas that they know will get nowhere just so they can accuse the other side of being intransigent. Take legislation to allow school districts to lay off teachers based on budget constraints and without considering seniority, which Gov. Wolf vetoed Wednesday.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
By Susan McCarthy-Miller Long before Donald Trump arrived on the political scene, a two-pronged tempest of gargantuan proportion was gathering power in the form of "tolerable racism. " As President Obama assumed the highest political office in the world, the innermost feelings of our citizenry were slowly being roused by the election of a biracial Hawaiian. These heretofore broad-minded voters were now accessing their deepest racially prejudiced feelings, long tamped down in the name of political correctness, social harmony, and high-minded tolerance.
NEWS
May 15, 2016
John Quincy Adams Militant Spirit By James Traub Basic Books. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow To read this biography of our sixth president is to see both how little and how much has changed in American politics in the last two centuries. John Quincy Adams, son of our second president, John Adams, spent a miserable and largely unsuccessful four years in the White House from 1825 to 1829. Like Jimmy Carter, he is generally acknowledged to have made his greatest contributions after leaving office.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Nabbing a ticket to the Democratic National Convention could be tough. Getting one to PoliticalFest is much easier. Tickets went on sale Wednesday for the nonpartisan presidential-history celebration, which was held at the Convention Center during the 2000 Republican National Convention here. This year, instead of one location, seven museums will feature dozens of exhibits from July 22 to 27. "We're calling it PoliticalFest 2.0," said former Gov. Ed Rendell, chair of the DNC host committee organizing the fest.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Chris Brennan and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
The man in the middle of the bribery case against Democratic State Sen. Larry Farnese of Center City is identified only as "Person A" in the federal indictment released Tuesday. But two sources, one familiar with the investigation and the other with the people involved, say he is Ted Mucellin, who briefly worked in Mayor Michael Nutter's administration and who has been Farnese's political consultant for eight years. Mucellin's name came to light the day Farnese told constituents he had done nothing wrong and a Republican leader said the GOP would look for someone to run against Farnese this fall.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By Craig Snyder A movement arises within and surrounding a major American political party, a movement that rejects and condemns the official and unofficial establishment of that party's leadership. The party "establishment" is vilified as corrupt and corrupting. National leaders in the party, at both the presidential and congressional level, have to fear first, maybe even mostly, their primary elections. They can afford less and less to position themselves for the broad American political center because they must survive ideological purity contests in primaries within their party.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|