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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as election day unfolded, Councilman Wilson Goode Jr. said he knew how it would end. He was listed dead last on the ballot. Ahead of him was a field of qualified challengers. And - as has been the case before - the politician who says he doesn't care much for politics had run a minimal campaign. "I understood exactly what happened yesterday as it was happening and was prepared for it," Goode said Wednesday. "The goal for me was never winning elections. The goal for me was to serve.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On May 23, 2003, I attended the Baghdad news conference at which the U.S. viceroy, Paul Bremer, announced he was dissolving the Iraqi army. I thought of that day when I read of Wednesday's confrontation between 19-year-old student Ivy Dietrich and Jeb Bush, who had been blaming President Obama for the rise of the jihadis. She told the former Florida governor, "Your brother created ISIS. " Dietrich's claim was a bit too blunt but still right on the money. It should serve as a warning to 2016 presidential contenders: Using the Iraq war as a political club against the opposition can boomerang.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY PETER ORSZAG
YOUNG PEOPLE are disaffected with the political process and lack any interest in running for office, a new book by Jennifer Lawless, of American University, and Richard Fox, of Loyola Marymount University, demonstrates. Yet the book itself perhaps unintentionally underscores one of the key reasons why: We know too much about our politicians. There are 519,682 elected officials in the U.S., the authors note, the vast majority of whom hold local jobs; they are mayors, city councillors, school-board members, coroners or recorders of deeds.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. recalls a curious child with a seat at the table as the grown-ups in West Philadelphia plotted campaigns for political office independent of the Democratic machine. Anthony H. Williams was there in the late 1960s and early 1970s because his father, Hardy Williams, was a chief plotter. "He always appeared more mature than his age," Goode said of the younger Williams. "Little Tony, as we called him, was always around and always interested in what we were doing.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
THE POLLS and surveys tell you education is the issue that voters care about most in the mayor's race. But the streets tell a different story. Thousands of people have marched through Philadelphia recently - to protest the police killings of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Brandon Tate-Brown in Frankford and Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The outcry hasn't been just about the deaths - but for greater transparency in how police-involved shootings are investigated, and for bad cops to face meaningful discipline.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia prosecutor who is running for judge has agreed to pay a $300 ethics fine for raising money for her campaign while working for the city. Deborah Watson-Stokes, a lawyer in the District Attorney's Office from 1990 to February 2015, admitted she violated the City Charter by soliciting campaign funds and taking part in political activity on the job. On Thursday, she settled an Ethics Board complaint against her by agreeing to pay the fine. City rules prohibit most employees from fund-raising or taking part in political activity on the job. Watson-Stokes officially submitted her resignation Jan. 15 but continued to work in the District Attorney's Office until Feb. 6, the day when she had scheduled a joint retirement party and fund-raiser for her judicial campaign, the Ethics Board found.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Thursday named the dean of economics and finance at Claremont McKenna College in California as its next president. S. Brock Blomberg, 48, a political economist who studies terrorism, replaces Lucien "Terry" Winegar, who had been serving as interim president since Bobby Fong's death in September. Blomberg takes over July 1 as the 17th president of Ursinus, a 1,600-student liberal arts college in Collegeville. "Our objective was to discover someone who could embrace the Ursinus DNA, our values and what we are about, who is passionate about the liberal arts, and comes with highly regarded leadership experience," Michael Marcon, a college trustee and search committee chair, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
ALTHOUGH the first primaries of the 2016 election season are still months away, the IRS appears to be already gearing up to investigate churches that participate in politics. The Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative group based in Arizona, sued the IRS this week to learn more about the agency's election-year plans. The lawsuit alleges that the IRS is refusing to disclose details of an agreement it made with the Freedom From Religion Foundation, an atheist group, to enforce a law that would strip a church of its tax-exempt status if it were involved in obvious political activity.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | Christine M. Flowers, Daily News Columnist
IT'S POPULAR to say that age is just a number. I never understood that statement. Aside from being self-evident, the implication that age is irrelevant makes absolutely no sense. Age is a number that means a lot of things, including how much you have accomplished, experienced and, perhaps most importantly, the mistakes you've avoided making during a lifetime. But when we say "age is just a number," it's as if we're trying to minimize the negative perception of being "older. " I put that word in quotation marks because its connotation has evolved over recent decades.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY A YOUNGSTER with the sounds of newspaper presses thundering in their dreams had one great wish: They wanted to be a Sandy Grady when they grew up. Sandy could mold a sentence into a work of art, no matter the subject, from boxing to the Olympics to baseball to the political scene, all of which he graced with a fluid style that never seemed to bump. Some of his memorable words still ring like a punch in the funny bone. He once wrote of an unpopular Eagles coach: "He couldn't sell iced tea to a Tasmanian at a dried-up water hole.
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