CollectionsPolitics
IN THE NEWS

Politics

NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was furious. In May 2012, top officials at the bistate agency lashed out at a processor of imported vehicles that operated at Port Newark and owed $2.8 million in rent and fees. The agency warned Foreign Auto Preparation Service (FAPS) that if it did not take remedial action quickly, it would be in violation of its lease. "For years, FAPS has failed to meet its financial responsibilities as a tenant at our port, and this practice stops today," then-Deputy Executive Director Bill Baroni said.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
A court filing Tuesday suggested that political motives and concerns over a Supreme Court pornography scandal were behind efforts to alter the wording of a judicial retirement-age ballot question to extend the tenure of Pennsylvania judges to age 75. In a suit that seeks to have the GOP-backed rewrite of the ballot question deemed unlawful, plaintiffs argued that lawmakers sought to obscure what voters would read in the election booth just as scandal...
NEWS
August 9, 2016
ISSUE | N.J. PENSIONS State must pay up New Jersey's transportation funding is a priority to help fix our ailing infrastructure, but the teachers' pension funding is a greater priority and has long been a problem ("Sweeney: No transport fund fix, no pension vote," Friday). All state government employees deserve the pensions they paid into and were promised. We chose to participate in a plan with a promised payout because we believed in our elected officials. Those officials must come to the decision that they owe the state pension plans the required money.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Andrea Mitchell, the broadcast journalist, stood in front of Philadelphia's City Hall and described the candidate's news conferences this way: "They became really great shows. Not much news was created. But [he] was a very colorful character and the repartee was usually . . . good entertainment. " Larry Kane, another well-known face from local television, characterized the same candidate like this: "He's a very alive, vital, emotional kind of person. On television, he becomes a spokesman for thousands and thousands of people and their frustrations.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Ned Barnett is the editorial page editor of the Raleigh, N.C., News & Observer For all their talk of the future, political conventions are nostalgic. They summon history and draw upon ingrained loyalties. And they are in themselves throwbacks, a gathering of hats and signs in a telecommuting time. Democracy is wonderful theater, but I was struck this year by how both conventions were theater without connection to reality. For neither convention directly addressed what is now central to the American experience - the digital revolution.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Dylan Purcell, STAFF WRITERS
What does it take to lead a union for 4,652 electricians - one the state's most politically powerful? Start with $30 million in campaign contributions spent over the course of 16 years on state and local candidates by the city's electricians' union, Local 98 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Over the years, the union's money and manpower have helped elect mayors, City Council members, county commissioners, congressmen, state legislators, governors, and at least 58 judges, including the union leader's brother and five Pennsylvania Supreme Court justices.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
IN "LOST in Democrats' Fantasy Land," (July 29) Christine Flowers peddles a dark, stark view of politics that leaves little room for the complexities of real life. Women and people of color know better than most what it's like to have our rights trampled, our safety threatened, and even our lives endangered by politicians and policies that fail to recognize our humanity. We can't afford to live with rose-colored glasses, especially when the Hyde Amendment and other bans on insurance coverage for abortion are used to deny women the care they need and push families into poverty.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Andrew F. Read The doctor tried antibiotic after antibiotic, but the bacteria in the woman's body continued to proliferate. With only two drugs left, the doctor asked for my advice. An evolutionary biologist collaborating with the physician to study antibiotic resistance, I suggested he use both drugs simultaneously. I reasoned that since the two drugs had different modes of action, more mutations would be required for the bacteria to generate resistance to both drugs. In truth, we had no idea what to do, and there wasn't enough justification to go with my theory.
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
On June 7, in a funky upstairs office at the SoHa Arts Building in Haddon Township, Alex Law choked back tears - not entirely successfully - as he thanked a room full of volunteers for their efforts on his congressional campaign, an effort that he had just learned failed by 40 points. In the eight weeks since he lost a hard-fought primary to incumbent Rep. Donald Norcross, Law, 25, has moved into a new apartment in Collingswood, free-lanced as a consultant for small businesses in Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey, and made public appearances with likely 2017 gubernatorial candidate Steve Fulop.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Rashad Robinson
  'Look at my African American over here. " When Donald Trump pointed out a black man at a California rally, social media erupted: Here was a man running the most racist campaign in decades trying to use the language of diversity for electoral gain. But here's a dirty little secret: Trump's contradictions when it comes to black people are the norm in American politics. Politicians on both sides of the aisle have long used black communities as pawns in their political chess game, each capitalizing on the symbolism of "blackness" to serve their parties' electoral needs.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|