CollectionsPolitics
IN THE NEWS

Politics

NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It's a neat trick. Fulfill retrograde girlish fantasies (tall, handsome, rich prince whisks you away from your dreary chores and your lousy dresses), while also pandering to the demands of contemporary gender politics: offer empowerment, self-actualization, and any other politically correct goal on the current curriculum. And this touring production of the Broadway show Cinderella , at the Academy of Music for the Thanksgiving holiday week, adds to the PC effect with a veritable rainbow of actors in the ensemble.
NEWS
November 25, 2014
T RY TO THINK of a rise and fall in Pennsylvania politics as stunning or rapid as Kathleen Kane's. Got one? Yeah, me neither. A year ago, just 10 months in office, the state's first woman and first Democrat elected attorney general was being touted for governor or U.S. senator. These days she faces possible criminal charges amid rumors of resignation. Quite a fall. In 2013, she rocketed to national notice, elating her Democratic base. She closed a loophole to stop residents denied gun permits here from getting them from Florida.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
A PAIR OF LONGTIME political players, state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams and former District Attorney Lynne Abraham, entered the 2015 Democratic primary election for mayor yesterday to little surprise but great fanfare. Abraham, 73, went first, laying out a campaign platform of economic development, business-tax reform, public safety and improvements to education. "If you want a leader who . . . has the experience to get things done, the grit, the desire and the courage to break some china along the way and turn Philadelphia into a great American city, I am your candidate," Abraham told about 300 people at the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
November 17, 2014
WE LEARNED many new things at City Council's hearings on Philadelphia's energy future last week. Here's one: components of natural gas include propane, butane, methane . . . and here, in Philadelphia, civic pain. We're referring to the pain of listening to experts on Philadelphia's future as an energy hub and wondering why the city wasn't having these discussions years ago. And the pain of realizing that PGW's private ownership could be a key to the city's future as an energy hub, but Council killed that prospect just last week primarily because of "process" instead of the potential outcome for the city as a whole.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the hours after his arrest, Eric Frein allegedly told detectives that he ambushed a state police barracks in the Poconos because he wanted to "wake people up" about his concerns over the government. He also described his killing of a state police corporal as an "assassination," according to an updated list of charges filed in court late Thursday afternoon. He shot the corporal because "he wanted to make a change" in government and believed "that voting was insufficient to do so, because there was no one worth voting for," investigators wrote in the newly filed court records.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
TOM WOLF, a millionaire from York who distributes kitchen cabinets, did not win the race for governor of Pennsylvania yesterday. Gov. Corbett lost it. In 77 days, Wolf will be sworn in as the state's 47th governor, mostly because of political and policy decisions that Corbett made. Corbett last night conceded the race in Pittsburgh, saying that he stood by all those decisions even though they proved unpopular. "I said I may be a one-term governor. And I am," Corbett said.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
So-called dark-money groups spent 27 percent more on this year's elections than they did in 2010, thanks to reckless Supreme Court decisions and regulatory failures allowing unlimited, undisclosed political contributions. The groups hide donors behind the tax code, disguising themselves as "social welfare" organizations. In fact, they are an increasingly powerful and poisonous political force. Analysts say they are just beginning to flex their muscles in preparation for the main event: the 2016 presidential election.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He defended his Ebola quarantine policy on national television, lambasted President Obama's leadership as limited to "seven-minute lectures from the South Lawn," and supplied morning-show fodder by ordering a Hurricane Sandy protester to "sit down and shut up. " Gov. Christie spent last week in the national limelight, shrinking from neither criticism of his Ebola pronouncements by public health officials - "We're right and they were wrong," he...
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 2010 federal law bars private money managers who invest state and local pension funds from making political contributions to state and local officials who hire private money managers. But wealthy hedge, buyout, and real estate investment magnates still can and do finance Congress members and national political committees closely tied to state and local politicians while also collecting fat fees from state and local pension funds. Last week, New Jersey and Philadelphia both acted on legislation that attempts to curb these conflicts of interest.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|