CollectionsPolitics
IN THE NEWS

Politics

NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
After months of punishing headlines, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane has struck back hard. She took another swipe at a familiar target: the so-called old boys' network. In doing so, she proved the merit of a well-worn political adage: when in trouble, change the subject. On Oct. 1, the day she was charged with a fresh count of perjury, Kane accused a Supreme Court justice of exchanging emails that included "racial, misogynistic pornography. " On Thursday, the day the suspension of her law license took effect, she made public 48 crude emails of Justice J. Michael Eakin's.
NEWS
October 24, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former political operative Greg Naylor testified Thursday in federal court that U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah directed him to pay $22,600 of his son's college-tuition debt. Testifying for the prosecution in Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr.'s trial on multiple counts of tax and bank fraud, Naylor said he did not question the Philadelphia Democrat's request in 2007 that he pay Fattah Jr.'s debt to Drexel University. Naylor, 67, who is also expected to testify in the congressman's corruption trial next year, appeared relaxed as he told jurors he was repaid in full.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Two former foes did big favors Wednesday for Hillary Rodham Clinton. First, Vice President Biden got out of her way in the Democratic presidential contest, announcing from the White House that he would not run for the nomination. Then, writer David Brock, once a member of the "vast right-wing conspiracy" that hounded the Clintons and now head of a pro-Clinton super PAC, argued in a Philadelphia speech that the House Select Committee on Benghazi should be disbanded. "There's no reason to keep this farce going," Brock said to the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 13, 2015
PSYCHIATRISTS, psychologists, therapists, social workers and other mental health care practitioners, rejoice: It appears a lot of elected officials, including a remarkable number of conservatives, have your back. Since the shooting at Umpqua Community College that left 10 dead earlier this month, there has been a steady drumbeat of calls for better care for the mentally ill. For a moment, let's assume it's a genuine concern and not what doctors might describe as a defense mechanism - as in, "The National Rifle Association won't allow me to advocate for universal background checks on gun purchases, so what can I say to sound sympathetic after a mass shooting?"
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A campaign-fueled text-message thread among close Republican allies in a Gloucester County township, inadvertently sent to an unintended recipient, has set a bitter tone for an election that once again will decide which party runs the town. And it wasn't without a bit of inspiration from The Wizard of Oz . The messages, exchanged by a handful of West Deptford Republicans, centered on planning a former mayor's campaign and attacking the opposition. Photos swapped included depictions of Democratic Mayor Denice DiCarlo - dubbed by one participant "one ugly chic" - as the Wicked Witch of the West (West Deptford, an image noted)
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The government watchdog group Committee of Seventy has teamed up with three local political action committees in seeking accountability from the chairman of the City Commissioners. A right-to-know request was filed last week by Philadelphia 3.0, one of the PACs, on behalf of the four groups seeking information on City Commissioner Anthony Clark's attendance, communication with staff and voters, and his work activities. "We're very concerned that the taxpayers aren't getting their money's worth from Commissioner (Anthony)
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
They say you should never talk about politics or religion. But these days, politics is religion. And I think that's a wonderful thing. This way, instead of not talking about two things separately, you can not talk about two things together. This is much more efficient. It's like if you were going to have dinner of spaghetti and salad. In the old days, we ate them separately, but these days, we mix the spaghetti and the salad together and eat them that way. Doesn't that sound delicious?
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Phil Murphy, a likely Democratic candidate for New Jersey governor in 2017, launched a political organization Monday that he says will spend millions of dollars to promote a "middle-class-first" agenda. The organization, New Way for New Jersey, aired its first cable TV ad Monday night in parts of Bergen County, a key area of Democratic voters. The ad will expand starting Tuesday. "These guys have it wrong," Murphy says as the 30-second ad shows images of Republican presidential candidates, including Donald Trump and Gov. Christie.
NEWS
September 9, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Candidates came a-courtin' to Philadelphia's annual Labor Day parade and rally Monday, but only one of them - a man already elected - got to speak. The rest, including Democratic mayoral nominee Jim Kenney, worked the crowd, posing for pictures, shaking hands, and slapping backs. "Today is about jobs, jobs that pay, and jobs that fairly recognize the work that people do," Gov. Wolf said, addressing a cheerful crowd where people were as interested in catching up with one another as listening to his remarks from a podium set up in the parking lot of the Sheet Metal Workers union hall in South Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
One real pleasure of being a longtime viewer of Philadelphia's theater scene is watching talented young students grow from bit-part standouts to full-fledged leading men and women. Jennifer Kidwell and Scott Sheppard, co-artistic directors of Lightning Rod Special and graduates of the Pig Iron School for Advanced Performance Training's inaugural class, break out big time with Underground Railroad Game , a funny, poignant take on racial politics as embodied by a pair of middle school teachers.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|