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NEWS
May 4, 2016
'When you become famous," the famous political consultant James Carville once said, "being famous becomes your profession. " It's a sign of the stunning success of Donald Trump's crossover act that we no longer even think about this campaign's most revolutionary effect on our politics: the demolition of the line between celebrity and political achievement. Of course, success in politics can itself breed celebrity. Carville earned his by combining his eccentric sense of humor with actual skill in helping Bill Clinton become president in 1992.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
WILLIAM R. MILLER IV, 68, founder of a public relations firm and longtime player in city politics who helped shape political campaigns, died Saturday of complications from a stroke. Mr. Miller, who lived in East Mount Airy, died at Abington Memorial Hospital, said his daughter, Darisha. "I am definitely going to miss him. I'm a daddy's girl. " For several decades, Mr. Miller helped guide the political aspirations of some of the biggest names in city politics and helped elect W. Wilson Goode Jr. as the first black mayor.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TV Critic
What if a tree fell during a televised presidential debate and Twitter and Facebook weren't there to record it/share it/mock it for its inability to remain upright? Would viewers have a better sense of the forest? Those aren't exactly the questions researchers set out to answer in a recently published study by the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center, but they might as well have been. In an article published online in the journal Political Communication, the Penn researchers concluded that people who used social media knew more about the 2012 election than nonusers, but that those who multitasked while watching the debates between President Obama and Mitt Romney didn't learn as much.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Mark Fazlollah, and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
John H. Estey, a former top aide to Gov. Ed Rendell and a prominent player in city and state politics, will plead guilty to wire fraud, his lawyer and federal prosecutors said Friday, the latest turn in a pay-to-play corruption probe that already snared Pennsylvania's former treasurer. According to people familiar with the case, Estey has been secretly cooperating with investigators, possibly for years. He was caught in 2011 in an FBI sting by agents posing as businessmen seeking his influence with state legislators, according to court filings in Harrisburg.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Which political connection is worse - Gov. Christie, whose job performance rating in New Jersey is at an all-time low in a new poll, or Tom Morello, former guitarist for Rage Against the Machine, who organized a concert nearly two decades ago to raise legal defense funds for convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal? Those are among the issues voters are being asked to ponder in the race for a congressional seat in South Jersey's Third District heats up ahead of the June 7 primary. Republican U.S. Rep. Tom MacArthur and potential Democratic challenger Jim Keady - who first must win a contested primary for his party's nod - are exchanging barbs over their political associations.
NEWS
April 30, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Clinton playing politics with city taxpayers Hillary Clinton's support of Mayor Kenney's regressive 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax is misguided ("Clinton, Cruz bring campaigns to Pa.," April 21). We sincerely doubt that she was made aware of the significant loss of family-sustaining jobs that will result if this outrageous tax is passed. Similarly, Clinton likely has no idea that the projected revenues from the tax will never come to fruition due to the precipitous decline in sales of sugar-sweetened drinks that will occur and the underground markets that will arise if the tax proposal becomes law. Keep in mind that Kenney endorsed Clinton for president.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Philadelphia Traffic Court died Tuesday after a decades-long illness. The cause of death: corruption. It was 48. Shepherded to its grave by a statewide ballot measure, the court was preceded in death by other antiquated city patronage mills like the Clerk of Quarter Sessions (2010) and the Board of Revision of Taxes (also 2010, although after only four months in the grave, that one rose again). It is survived by a string of its former judges who have either spent time in or are still confined to prison for crimes tied to fixing tickets in exchange for porn, concert tickets, or the simple opportunity to extend a favor to a friend.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Francesca Serritella, Columnist
To care about politics in the age of social media is to be a little angry all the time. If the 24-hour cable news cycle isn't enough, Twitter and Facebook will help you find something new and enraging to click on 86,400 seconds a day. This primary election has been brutal. Even if you have a candidate you're passionate about, especially if you do, the Internet can be toxic. Toxic yet alluring. Why is it so much more tempting to click on an article with a headline you abhor than one you agree with?
NEWS
April 18, 2016
1992 June 13: In a speech to the Rev. Jesse Jackson's Rainbow Coalition, Bill Clinton says: "You had a rap singer here last night named Sister Souljah. . . . She told the Washington Post about a month ago, and I quote, 'If black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people?' . . . If you took the words 'white' and 'black' and reversed them, you might think [former KKK leader] David Duke was giving that speech. " Nov. 3: Bill Clinton defeats Republican incumbent George H.W. Bush in the general election for president while receiving 83 percent of the African American vote, according to exit polls.
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