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NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
On June 7, in a funky upstairs office at the SoHa Arts Building in Haddon Township, Alex Law choked back tears - not entirely successfully - as he thanked a room full of volunteers for their efforts on his congressional campaign, an effort that he had just learned failed by 40 points. In the eight weeks since he lost a hard-fought primary to incumbent Rep. Donald Norcross, Law, 25, has moved into a new apartment in Collingswood, free-lanced as a consultant for small businesses in Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey, and made public appearances with likely 2017 gubernatorial candidate Steve Fulop.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Rashad Robinson
  'Look at my African American over here. " When Donald Trump pointed out a black man at a California rally, social media erupted: Here was a man running the most racist campaign in decades trying to use the language of diversity for electoral gain. But here's a dirty little secret: Trump's contradictions when it comes to black people are the norm in American politics. Politicians on both sides of the aisle have long used black communities as pawns in their political chess game, each capitalizing on the symbolism of "blackness" to serve their parties' electoral needs.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
By Cynthia Terrell and Susannah Wellford With the convening of the Democratic and Republican Parties, we see greater diversity in their national delegations and leadership than what we currently have in Congress. Women hold less than 20 percent of the seats in the Senate and House, making the United States 95th internationally in the number of women elected to national offices. Imagine if the Senate or House required gender parity for each state? Before completely dismissing this idea, consider this: Both parties already have statewide and national rules requiring gender equality.
NEWS
July 28, 2016
Chelsea Clinton, wearing a blue floral dress, addressed a crowd of more than 100 fashionable women at a joint Glamour and Facebook event Tuesday afternoon. "We have to come together and work together. As mom said, 'We are stronger together,' " Clinton said during a live Q&A at the Wells Fargo center that also featured actresses Lena Dunham and America Ferrera. The 30-minute discussion touched on various campaign issues such as immigration and women's rights, with all three women chiming in. Ferrera said she understood what Bernie Sanders' supporters are feeling.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
After a raucous Republican convention nominated the very conservative Barry Goldwater in 1964, President Lyndon Johnson's campaign ran an advertisement quoting William Scranton, Pennsylvania's moderate governor, describing "Goldwaterism" as a "crazy-quilt collection of absurd and dangerous positions. " Welcome to what will certainly be one of the central themes of the Democratic National Convention. Donald Trump's nomination at a dark and angry convention in Cleveland and his acceptance speech embracing a racially tinged authoritarian nationalism open up a wealth of opportunities for Hillary Clinton's campaign.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
By David Gans Our campaign-finance system is badly broken and is deforming our democracy. The problem is the Supreme Court, not the Constitution. In a series of 5-4 rulings, Chief Justice John Roberts and his conservative colleagues have rewritten the constitutional guarantee of freedom of speech, insisting that money is speech, that corporations are an essential part of "We the People," and that the government's only legitimate interest in limiting election spending and giving is to prevent bribery.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
What's hot in high-tech political tools, designed to get disaffected citizens off their duffs? A Kickstarter-like project for viable independent candidates. Crowd-sourced dossiers on politicians, detailing their true actions and agendas on important issues. Open-source software that crunches and charts public records, making governmental agencies accountable. Electronic alerts and pre-stamped mail-in ballots that jog would-be voters when election day approaches and explain all the issues, eliminating the "gee, that name sounds good" guesswork that often takes over in the polling booth.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Signe Wilkinson, Staff Writer
"We're voting for Hillary," Charles Lindsey says about himself and his friend Gregory McDowell as they sat on their Fairhill steps. They were among a dozen people I interviewed along four blocks of Cambria Street on both sides of Germantown Avenue. For those who think that's the way all of solidly Democratic North Philadelphia feels, walk a few steps farther. On Germantown Avenue and Cambria, Josh Rembert says, "I can't vote for Hillary. " He then veers wildly from the Democratic script to call out Donald Trump's immigration policy and business background as the reasons why he'd vote for the GOP ticket.
NEWS
July 25, 2016
As Philadelphians brace for the crush of humanity arriving for the Democratic National Convention, commiserate with your counterparts in 1948. That year, the city hosted three conventions - Republicans, Democrats, and Progressives - the only city ever to do so. That these three parties clamored to host their shindig in Philadelphia is perhaps not surprising. The city played host to the most famous convention of all, that which created the U.S. Constitution. There was a practical reason as well.
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