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Pollen

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NEWS
April 6, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Pollen isn't just the stuff that coats our windshields with a fine powder and makes some of us sneeze uncontrollably in the warm weather months; it's also pure male sex. The birds and the wheeze, if you will. Pollen is "tiny little grains which represent the male half of the fertilization process," said Dr. Michael Phillips, a professor, clinician and researcher at the University of Pennsylvania's allergy and immunolgy department. "It's spread to the female half, where fertilization takes place.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
This mild winter evidently is something to sneeze at. Seduced by three months of gentle weather, trees throughout the Philadelphia area have begun emitting their pollen well ahead of schedule as they begin their annual reproductive frenzy. It is all happening so quickly that Donald Dvorin, an allergist who is the region's official pollen tracker, will start posting his daily counts next week, about 10 days earlier than usual. Dvorin said his decision was prompted by his patients - allergy-sufferers ambushed by the microscopic grains.
NEWS
April 19, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As if having record-breaking, August-style heat and humidity in April isn't uncomfortable enough, the weather is pushing tree pollen and mold counts to unprecedented levels. For people with both asthma and allergies, this heat spell has been not just unpleasant, but risky, pulmonary specialists say. In the worst scenario, a person with diagnosed allergies but undiagnosed asthma could suffer a life-threatening asthma attack triggered by pollen and outdoor exertion, said Gilbert D'Alonzo, a pulmonary specialist and asthma researcher at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Sufferers can track pollen counts on an iPhone app, iPollenCount, and at the website for the National Allergy Bureau: www.aaaai.org/global/nab-pollen-counts.aspx . Avoid peak times for pollen exposure (hot, dry, windy days, often between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.). If you must be outside, a dust mask may help. Wash your clothes more often. Shower and wash your hair before going to bed. Even wiping your hair, skin, and equipment before coming inside can help. Don't dry clothes outside on high-pollen days.
LIVING
June 29, 1986 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Hey, you're only human. When slick advertisements proclaim the amazing powers of products designed to improve life, love and the pursuit of excellence, you're entitled to exhibit a little curiosity. Ever since traveling salesmen roamed from town to town on horse and buggy and mesmerized the crowds with promises of wonder potions, consumers have been attracted to the new and improved. Today, athletes and those trying to maintain or improve their health are often susceptible to the lure of "super" products.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some seasons, pollen is up. In others, down. And then there are those - like this one - that are all over the place, with cold following warmth following cold following warmth, nipping the buds every time they start to, well, bud. Tuesday's tree-pollen counts locally were the highest so far this season, but still less than a sixth of last year's high, and a potentially suppressing rain was predicted for Friday. Counts are rising late this spring. "Last year was a mild but quite moist winter, and the season started earlier and lasted longer," said S. Michael Phillips, director of clinical allergies and immunology at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
El Nino is making us el sicko. The world's best-known climate confuser, responsible for our mild winter, is also putting allergy sufferers under the weather. "Due to the unusual effects of El Nino, with the warm and moist winter, plants have survived well, resulting in more pollen and an earlier and longer allergy season," said Dr. Michael Phillips, a professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania's allergy and immunology department. We're going to be hit with a higher than normal amount of pollen because some of the buds on trees and in grass and weeds are usually killed as a result of cold weather, especially ice storms, said Phillips, who divides his time at Penn teaching, performing research and treating patients with allergies.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe and Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Here is today's hay-fever quiz. There's so much pollen in the air that: a) The pollen measures 204 grains per cubic meter. b) The pollen measures 998 grains. c) The pollen measures 117 grains. d) Folks around the Philadelphia region are sneezing their heads off. Depending on whom you ask, or where you ask the question, the answer may be any or all of the above. But the only one that is undeniably true is "d. " "Welcome to the season," said Dr. Leonard Bielory, director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at New Jersey Medical School in Newark.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
Magee DeFelice, M.D., Chief of Allergy and Immunology at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, wrote this for the Healthy Kids blog at philly.com/healthykids. Tree pollen is at its height now, and many children are suffering from itchy, watery, red, and swollen eyes - but is it allergic conjunctivitis or an infection? With allergic conjunctivitis, the eyes will be very itchy, but should not feel painful; symptoms are present in both eyes; eye secretions are watery; the eyelids may be swollen; and there are often nasal symptoms, too. Children do not typically develop fever with allergies, and will likely experience more discomfort when they are outside.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Donald J. Dvorin did his daily tree-pollen counts this week, he found something astonishing. The amounts were perfectly normal - for the first week in April. He even found pollen from pines, which typically shows up in May. To allergy experts such as Dvorin, that means the sneeze season has already blown in and could peak by April Fool's Day, three to four weeks early. It is the price to be paid for the warmest winter Philadelphia has experienced since the 1931-32 season, the Dust Bowl era. The average temperature from Dec. 1 to yesterday - the meteorological winter, as defined by the National Weather Service - was 41.3 degrees, about 7 degrees above average.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2016
Magee DeFelice, M.D., Chief of Allergy and Immunology at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, wrote this for the Healthy Kids blog at philly.com/healthykids. Tree pollen is at its height now, and many children are suffering from itchy, watery, red, and swollen eyes - but is it allergic conjunctivitis or an infection? With allergic conjunctivitis, the eyes will be very itchy, but should not feel painful; symptoms are present in both eyes; eye secretions are watery; the eyelids may be swollen; and there are often nasal symptoms, too. Children do not typically develop fever with allergies, and will likely experience more discomfort when they are outside.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Anthony R. Wood, Staff Writer
Pleasantly warm and dry, with a light breeze ideal for flying, Monday was a fabulous day to be a pollen grain. And a terrible one to be an allergy sufferer. The peak season for tree-pollen levels has arrived, and on Monday pollen counts registered in the "extreme" category, with an attendant outbreak of sneezing, congestion, watery eyes, coughing, and assorted complaints, according to Donald J. Dvorin, the region's official pollen counter. Despite the prospect of showers, the rest of the week could be as miserable for the allergic, warned Dvorin, an allergist with the Asthma Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It took a while, but goldenrod is finally in rehab. Yes, you'll still see the wild ones scrambling through roadside ditches, unruly plumes of vivid yellow that scream "I am so out of control!" And yes, people with hay fever still recoil from it, mistaking it for ragweed. But it's ragweed pollen, not goldenrod, that causes all those allergic sniffles in late summer and early fall. The rap is so unfair - and so yesterday. Goldenrod is moving from pariah to player in the garden world, its reputation redeemed by converging trends: Gardening for wildlife.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in a series of occasional articles about the regional effects of climate change and how we're coping.   Even though she'd been walking in the woods for only a few minutes, Jen McIntyre was in distress. Tears were running down her cheeks. She couldn't breathe through her nose. "I feel like this is our new reality," McIntyre said recently of the allergies that have begun to plague her. McIntyre, 43, of Mount Airy, never had allergies, aside from reactions to the odd dog or horse.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Sufferers can track pollen counts on an iPhone app, iPollenCount, and at the website for the National Allergy Bureau: www.aaaai.org/global/nab-pollen-counts.aspx . Avoid peak times for pollen exposure (hot, dry, windy days, often between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.). If you must be outside, a dust mask may help. Wash your clothes more often. Shower and wash your hair before going to bed. Even wiping your hair, skin, and equipment before coming inside can help. Don't dry clothes outside on high-pollen days.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
DURING my morning commute on SEPTA, I overheard several people discussing how their allergies have never been worse than they are this week. I can personally attest to that, as my own allergies flare daily. While this may seem like a normal spike in pollen we see this time of year, several studies have found that global warming is responsible for the increases in pollen and air pollution that are causing us all to suffer. The warmer temperatures and higher CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere allow plants to pollinate sooner and to pollinate for longer periods of time.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some seasons, pollen is up. In others, down. And then there are those - like this one - that are all over the place, with cold following warmth following cold following warmth, nipping the buds every time they start to, well, bud. Tuesday's tree-pollen counts locally were the highest so far this season, but still less than a sixth of last year's high, and a potentially suppressing rain was predicted for Friday. Counts are rising late this spring. "Last year was a mild but quite moist winter, and the season started earlier and lasted longer," said S. Michael Phillips, director of clinical allergies and immunology at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
This mild winter evidently is something to sneeze at. Seduced by three months of gentle weather, trees throughout the Philadelphia area have begun emitting their pollen well ahead of schedule as they begin their annual reproductive frenzy. It is all happening so quickly that Donald Dvorin, an allergist who is the region's official pollen tracker, will start posting his daily counts next week, about 10 days earlier than usual. Dvorin said his decision was prompted by his patients - allergy-sufferers ambushed by the microscopic grains.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This mild winter evidently is something to sneeze at. Seduced by three months of gentle weather, trees throughout the Philadelphia area have begun emitting their pollen well ahead of schedule as they begin their annual reproductive frenzy. It's all happening so quickly that Dr. Donald Dvorin, an allergist who is the region's official pollen tracker, will start posting his daily counts next week, about 10 days earlier than usual. Dvorin said his decision was prompted by his patients - allergy-sufferers ambushed by the microscopic grains.
SPORTS
April 12, 2010 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Turns out, there really was more than one story line out there among all the dogwoods and pollen this week. And ultimately, the one that will live on was pretty indelible as well. Probably just a little more heart tugging, too. For Phil Mickelson, it has always been about family. So this was mostly about emotion. Some 11 months ago, his wife, Amy, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Then, so was his mother, Mary. In June, Lefty played in the U.S. Open, his first tournament since they received the news.
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