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Pollen

NEWS
March 31, 2006 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andrew Frankenfield, an agriculture specialist, was planting sweet corn at a farm in northern Montgomery County when he noticed something missing: mud. For the first March in memory, the region's farms, ball fields and backyards are virtually mud-free. That's because nature has withheld an essential ingredient: water. Barring a downpour before midnight right atop the rain gauge at Philadelphia International Airport, this will officially be the driest March since 1966. The 0.91 inches measured since the beginning of the month is less than one-quarter of March's normal rainfall of 3.81 inches.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It took a while, but goldenrod is finally in rehab. Yes, you'll still see the wild ones scrambling through roadside ditches, unruly plumes of vivid yellow that scream "I am so out of control!" And yes, people with hay fever still recoil from it, mistaking it for ragweed. But it's ragweed pollen, not goldenrod, that causes all those allergic sniffles in late summer and early fall. The rap is so unfair - and so yesterday. Goldenrod is moving from pariah to player in the garden world, its reputation redeemed by converging trends: Gardening for wildlife.
FOOD
October 4, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
One morning last week, a new product was being touted on the chalkboard on the sidewalk in front of Le Petit Mitron, the anomalous patisserie francaise across from the R-5 SEPTA station in the borough of Narberth. Henceforth, in addition to its celebrated croissants, its quiches and fresh-baked French pastries, it would be carrying the local honey of one Scott T. Bartow - "exclusivly. " The word had been slightly truncated, perhaps to fit as the chalk-writer ran out of room.
NEWS
December 29, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
I'VE NEVER been one to make New Year's resolutions. I prefer my failures in small increments, so I make my resolutions weekly, and they usually come at the urging of my wife. How does it work, you ask? Well, sometimes she corners me at dinner, mere moments after the children have welcomed me home like a conquering hero. "Solomon, when are you gonna vacuum the inside of that car?" she'll ask, knowing that I must commit to doing it, or risk shattering the little ones' view of their father.
SPORTS
April 12, 2010 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Turns out, there really was more than one story line out there among all the dogwoods and pollen this week. And ultimately, the one that will live on was pretty indelible as well. Probably just a little more heart tugging, too. For Phil Mickelson, it has always been about family. So this was mostly about emotion. Some 11 months ago, his wife, Amy, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Then, so was his mother, Mary. In June, Lefty played in the U.S. Open, his first tournament since they received the news.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The trees are swollen with delicate leaves, the grasses are a deep green, the afternoons are soft and warm. And for people like Karen Gallagher, it doesn't get much worse. Gallagher and legions of others with pollen allergies have suffered through the most brutal week of the season, and next week doesn't look much better. "This is one of the worst weeks we've had in a long time," Donald J. Dvorin of the Asthma Center said yesterday from his office in Forked River, N.J. "Everybody is complaining.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in a series of occasional articles about the regional effects of climate change and how we're coping.   Even though she'd been walking in the woods for only a few minutes, Jen McIntyre was in distress. Tears were running down her cheeks. She couldn't breathe through her nose. "I feel like this is our new reality," McIntyre said recently of the allergies that have begun to plague her. McIntyre, 43, of Mount Airy, never had allergies, aside from reactions to the odd dog or horse.
FOOD
December 14, 1986 | The Inquirer staff
The official snack food for the 1987 Pan American Games in Indianapolis is really something to sneeze at, particularly if you have allergies. Officials of the Indianapolis office of the Food and Drug Administration say the Buzzin bar could create special problems for people allergic to ragweed because the 1.3-ounce bar contains 300 milligrams of pure bee pollen. "Bee pollen does have ragweed in it, and if you are allergic to ragweed, you could have a severe reaction," said Lilyan M. Goossens, consumer affairs officer for the FDA at Indianapolis.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a roof seven stories above Broad Street, Donald Dvorin plucks a tiny tube out of a whirring contraption and tries to figure out whether it's going to be a sneezy, eye-watering day. The views of City Hall and One Liberty Place are spectacular on this warm, sunny morning, but Dvorin's attention is focused on hundreds of tiny specks inside the plastic tube. He carries the tube down to the third floor of his Hahnemann University laboratory and spends the next 45 minutes examining its contents with a high- powered microscope.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Everywhere you look, people are sneezing. Rubbing their eyes. Rubbing their noses So many people have allergies - an estimated 35 million Americans with pollen allergies - that it makes you wonder. Maybe we're falling apart. As a group, that is. "No, I don't think we're evolving into a weak species," said Dr. Marc Goldstein, Hahnemann University allergist and clinical immunologist. "Our environment is becoming more hostile. We're living in air-polluted environments, outdoors and indoors.
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