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Pollen

NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday, when Ian Riley started sneezing and could not stop, his parents called allergist Donald Dvorin for an appointment. Yesterday, Dvorin managed to squeeze him in at his Mount Laurel office. The physician gave the Cherry Hill teen a couple of squirts of Astelin, a nasal spray, and the sneezing stopped. "This is the worst allergy season in my life," said Riley, 14. If it feels like the worst allergy season to Riley, that is only because it very well might be one of the worst allergy seasons in decades, certainly in many allergists' memories.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Allergens trapped in the air, carpet and chair upholstery at Gateway Regional High School are the likely cause of a red rash that has alarmed parents and landed about 90 students in the nurse's office since May, officials said at a Board of Education meeting yesterday. The rash at Gateway was the first reported in New Jersey schools, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Health and Senior Services, Marilyn Riley, said yesterday. Yet it was just one of many types that have had students nationwide itching since October.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Pollen, the globe-hopping doctor who admitted using fake identities and phony passports to dodge IRS investigators, was such a master at hiding his income that it may take three days of testimony to determine just how much he cheated on his taxes. Pollen, 68, pleaded guilty in May to income tax evasion and could be sentenced to as much as 20 years in prison when a sentencing hearing, which began yesterday, ends in U.S. District Court in Camden. Pollen, a former orthopedic surgeon from North Jersey, was accused of either underreporting his income or failing to pay taxes for a total of 10 years, beginning in 1967.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cold and gloomy stairway with its grit-covered steps was forbidding, but the man in the suit making his way to the roof was undeterred. A public-health nemesis was on the loose, and Donald J. Dvorin was on the trail of the elusive evidence. Dvorin is a full-time allergist, but he's also a part-time, volunteer detective. Consulting a homely rooftop machine atop his Center City office building, he's the one who figures out the region's daily pollen counts. And in recent years, they have taken on a fresh importance.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Christine Donato, Special to The Inquirer
This summer's near-record rainfall may serve as an alert for hay fever victims, some allergy experts say. Paul Reber, retired horticulture agent at the Penn State Cooperative Extension Service in Montgomery County, said the plants that affected hay fever would certainly be much healthier this year, considering the abundance of rain. "We've had perfect growing conditions this summer, which are sure to multiply the number of pollen-producing flowers," he said. Agronomy Extension agent Timothy Fritz said, however, that more rain this summer might actually help those with allergies.
LIVING
August 25, 1997 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michelle Robertson assumed it was a nasty cold that kept showing up every year around this time. She had days when she would sneeze her head off. She had trouble driving. She missed time from her job as a medical assistant at a doctor's office, and when she did show up, the patients would look at her red, swollen eyes and give her friendly advice: See a doctor. She did. "I just couldn't take it anymore," said Robertson, 25, who lives in Yardley. She learned that, as with about 20 percent of the population, she was allergic to pollen.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Allan Koff doesn't mow his own lawn anymore. Like many of his patients, he's allergic to the pollen that bursts from the trees around Philly every spring. "First it's the oak, then sycamore," he says, "and then comes dogwood - and the rest are close behind. " "That's how I got out of mowing the lawn," adds Koff, an internist with the Albert Einstein Health Care Network in the Northeast. Right now the long-needled pine is dumping yellow pollen onto windshields and sidewalks across the city.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There's a Manhattan aging in a barrel on a bar by the beach, flanked by 29 taps of craft beer. There's another bar, a so-called speakeasy, tucked behind a tiny wine store where diners buy bottles at $15 over retail to go with some wacky small plates, or choose from more than 280 whiskies. And what is that sound I keep hearing at the Jersey Shore? It's the sizzle of prime steaks on the grill. The shell-crack of crabs dusted in Old Bay. The dull click of raw-bar oysters being unhinged, their briny liquor glistening in the salt air. This is the summer of moving on by the sea, with a fine drink in hand and some old-school indulgences on my plate.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
He said his name was Luigi Somma. He carried a Pennsylvania driver's license that indicated he lived in the 1000 block of Surrey Road in the Far Northeast. The license and the address were legitimate. Luigi Somma was not. The name, federal authorities say, was one of several aliases used by William Pollen, once a highly regarded orthopedic surgeon who became a million-dollar tax deadbeat and led investigators on an exotic four-year chase before his arrest in August in the parking lot of a convenience store a few miles from his North Jersey home.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bumblebees wallowing salaciously in the saffron powder of fertility may be drunk with the joy of springtime flora, but pollen is making a lot of humans feel like hell. Mud-filled sinuses. Poison-ivy eyes. Tissue abrasions of the nose. Squall- warning sneezes that alarm the neighbors. Experts say that this is a faint variation of the misery to come in late summer when ragweed blows through town, afflicting two-thirds of allergy sufferers. Information like this is as useless as a vial of expired antihistamines to anyone who is allergic to tree and grass pollen.
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