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Polling Places

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NEWS
July 1, 1987 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
City election officials have joined the Democratic Party in seeking to delay a plan that would change polling places for thousands of voters in the November mayoral election. The plan, ordered by Common Pleas Judge Armand Della Porta, redraws the boundaries of 1,075 of the city's 1,795 election divisions, eliminating 115 divisions in the process. It also calls for retaining most polling places in the affected divisions, which have about 650,000 voters. Neither the judge nor election officials could say how many voters would be required to use a new polling place.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A last-minute Republican effort to relocate 63 Philadelphia polling places has sparked outrage from Democrat John Kerry's presidential campaign, which says the choice of locations in heavily African American neighborhoods shows that the GOP wants to suppress black voter turnout. But the Republicans said the real outrage is the state of the polling places they want to change - many of them in bars, homes or vacant buildings. The challenges, filed late Friday, appear to have little chance of succeeding.
NEWS
May 25, 1999
After voting with outdated equipment in San Francisco and Honolulu, I was amazed by Philadelphia's polling places. Finding a candidate was impossible; they were not in any order. Alphabetical would have helped. When I asked how to locate Mr. Councilman or Ms. Judge, etc., people in the polls would shout out "It's next to Nesmith" or "to the right of Kenney. " Why are the numbers never mentioned? Names mentioned out loud tend to influence a voter - not to mention the 10 people outside the polling place pushing candidates, which adds to the indecision.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dressed in a rose-colored wool coat and a leopard-spotted beret, Mabel Detweiler was ready for her task on an Election Day that was cold, dreary and sometimes wet. "It's real easy today," Detweiler said, as she slipped a green leaflet into the hand of a gray-haired woman voting at a polling station at Hopkins Ford in Abington. "If you're voting for all our Republicans, you just pull one lever. " Detweiler, 72, has worked in presidential elections since 1956, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected to his second term.
NEWS
November 3, 2011
Voters in 97 different divisions will be sent to new polling places for next Tuesday's general election. Gary Ferris, who arranges polling locations for the city commissioners' office, said about two-thirds of the new polling places were spurred by issues involving access for the disabled. In other cases, polling places had to be moved because the owners no longer wanted to rent them to the city, or because buildings were closed or undergoing repairs. A list of the polling places that are changing is available on the city commissioners' website: http://phillyelection.com/2011Changes.pdf . - Bob Warner
NEWS
October 12, 2011
Five polling places are being relocated for the Nov. 8 municipal elections, based on a vote Tuesday by the Bucks County Board of Elections. Voting in Bristol Township's District 6-1 will move permanently from the First Presbyterian Church to the Greater Word to the World Ministries at 4117 Woerner Ave. The four temporary relocations are: Falls Township District 4-1, from St. Paul's Episcopal Church to Pinewood Pool at 1 Pinewood Dr.; New...
NEWS
October 24, 1998
With its decades-old voting technology, Philadelphia takes as long as a month to finish the official count after an election. That's when the hulking, 25- and 50-year-old voting machines are working at all. Election Day malfunctions are routine. The system works only because city election workers spend the months leading up to an election in a labor-intensive and sometimes desperate scramble to ready the city's machines. Those chores involve scrounging spare parts for machines built by companies no longer in business, testing the machines, and then lugging these 1,000-pound behemoths to hundreds of polling places.
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | Daily News Staff Report
Voters in Philadelphia and throughout the state trickled to the polls this morning to face a crowded ballot that contains only a modicum of romance. Early reports were that turnout was low, although those who stay home - expected to be about 75 percent of the city's 820,000 registered voters - won't have the weather as an excuse. An Accu-Weather meteorologist said this morning that there were clear or partly sunny skies in every part of the state, with temperatures here and elsewhere in the low 60s. Conditions were expected to remain that way for most of the day, except for brief, widely scattered showers.
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | By RON GOLDWYN, MICHAEL DAYS and CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writers
About 64,000 Philadelphians will be voting in new divisions in next Tuesday's mayoral election. But city officials say it's no problem - those voters already know who they are. A massive realignment of election divisions, designed to make the polling places roughly equal in size, will go into effect Nov. 3 for wards 1 through 33. In those wards, according to election officials, 61 divisions have been eliminated and 433 divisions have new...
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials of Philadelphia and a national disabilities group have agreed to settle a civil-rights lawsuit with a three-year plan to make the city's voting machines and polling places more accessible to voters who are blind or use wheelchairs. The proposed settlement of the two-year-old suit by the National Organization on Disability and nine local disabled citizens was filed last week in federal court in Philadelphia. The agreement was preliminarily approved by U.S. District Judge John R. Padova, who ordered the proposal published in three newspapers this month and set a hearing for Nov. 19. "I cried - that was my reaction," said Jessie Jane Lewis, 55, a Manayunk performance artist who was one of the suit's nine local plaintiffs.
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NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
VOTERS WILL decide in tomorrow's general election whether Gov. Corbett gets a second chance in office or whether Democrat Tom Wolf will be the first candidate to defeat an incumbent governor since the state's Constitution was amended in 1968 to allow a second term. Voters in Pennsylvania also will cast ballots for members of the U.S. House, state House of Representatives and half of the 50 state Senate members. The polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voters with questions about their registration status or polling place can call the Philadelphia City Commission at 215-686-1590 or visit PhiladelphiaVotes.com.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL Camden County election officials are moving polling places out of schools in Cherry Hill after a request from the school district, the township announced Friday. The move is expected to result in less traffic and fewer safety concerns at schools, county officials said. "We're making an effort to get out of as many schools as possible" in the county, said Robert J. Venuti, chairman of the Board of Elections. Venuti said that keeping voters separate from students is important, particularly at a time when school safety is an issue.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
    The Montgomery County Election Board hit a major snag Thursday when it learned it might be too late to move several polling places. Under state law, counties must post a public notice 20 days before the election if any polling place is to be moved. The May 21 election is now 19 days away. After recessing to consult with their solicitor, the board members voted unanimously to approve the relocation of eight sites. Election Board Chairwoman Leslie Richards called those "unavoidable changes" that qualify for an exception to the 20-day limit.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Kristen A. Graham, and Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even Democrats acknowledged that people should not be casting their vote for president in front of an oversize portrait of Barack Obama, but the Republican election official whose voting booths sat beneath the Obama mural thought it was no big deal. Images of Philadelphians voting under Obama's paternal gaze at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in Lawncrest became a source of indignation and scandal for Republicans across the city, state and country Tuesday. The mural drew a legal challenge and a court order, became the subject of considerable media attention - including links on the Drudge Report - and inspired some rather overheated rhetoric, the outrage subsiding only after a Common Pleas Court judge ordered the offending mural covered.
NEWS
November 4, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Storm-related election problems in Pennsylvania are limited to a shrinking list of polling places without electric power - about 250 statewide as of midday Friday, but dropping hour by hour. Ron Ruman, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of State, said Friday that electric utilities had checked the status of all 5,900 polling places in the state. "They have all pledged that, after hospitals and nursing homes and public-safety facilities . . . they'll make these polling places a priority," Ruman said, adding that the utilities expected to have all polling places online by Election Day. In Montgomery County, spokesman Frank Custer said 14 polling places had power problems as of Friday morning, four of them in Lower Merion Township and the rest spread around the county.
NEWS
April 29, 2012
Like his father before him, former City Councilman Frank Rizzo Jr. is taking to the airwaves in his political retirement, as a radio talk-show host. Rizzo says he'll be doing occasional gigs on WPHT 1210, and he promises to be "less politically correct" than when he took calls at WWDB in the 1990s, while a councilman. "My slogan will be 'Rizzo Unleashed,' " Rizzo told us last week. "I'll always be polite, but I'll tell it like it is, and I have the ability to do that. I'm going to tell people possibly about some of the work ethic in City Council, in some of the people who represent them in the suburbs, and not in a watered-down way. " Asked about times when he pulled his punches, Rizzo said: "Talking about some of my colleagues, I had to be a little bit sensitive.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer
P OLL WORKERS in Chester worry that the state's new voter-ID bill could suppress turnout. You know what else suppresses turnout? Gunshots. More than a dozen shots rang out Tuesday morning near a polling place on Johnson Street in Sun Village, a watch-your-back neighborhood in Chester's East Side. "We have a lot of people who walk here to vote. We want to protect them, but how can we?" asked Ashaki-Imani Prince, a judge of elections. "They'll be afraid they might be shot. " The voting booths are inside a garage that already has a couple of bullet holes in it - including one that went through the front door into the back wall - from a previous shooting.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defiantly, begrudgingly or compliantly, Pennsylvania voters took the test run of the state's new voter ID requirement in stride Tuesday, generally producing photo identification as requested but occasionally registering protests. Whether they offered identification or not, registered voters who showed up at their old polling places were ushered to voting machines and permitted to start punching buttons - an option they'll be denied in November's general election unless they can show election officials a Pennsylvania driver's license or other specified ID. Secretary of the Commonwealth Carol Aichele, part of the state Republican machinery which pushed voter ID into law in mid-March, made a surprise visit Tuesday morning to five polling places in Northeast Philadelphia and said the state's "soft rollout" appeared to be successful.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, Daily News Staff Writer
JUST IN case you've forgotten, today is primary Election Day. But even if you've been snoozing, we have you covered. Here's everything you need to know: There are competitive primary races for the state House of Representatives in many parts of the city, a Democratic battle for the state Attorney General nomination and a Republican face off to oppose Democratic Sen. Bob Casey in November. There's also a competitive GOP primary for auditor general. And, of course, the Republican presidential primary, which went from exciting to dull when Rick Santorum, closest rival to front-runner Mitt Romney, dropped out. For more details on all the candidates, check out our roundups at www.phillyclout.com . The state's new law requiring photo identification for all voters at the polls doesn't go into effect until the Nov. 6 general election.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Bob Warner and Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
Barely a trickle of voters dripped into polls today in Pennsylvania, despite the chance to finally weigh-in on the presidential primary, with Republicans facing a choice of Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul or Mitt Romney. But the real contest is possibly the outcome when potential voters are asked to produce a picture ID for the first time before pulling the lever. The ID could be an issue for thousands of residents without drivers licenses, particularly in the city where public transportation is a norm.
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